S-Video versus Composite

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

I just tried using my 27-inch TV (CRT) set as a monitor by plugging in a
composite (yellow plug) from it to my computer video card composite
connector (yellow). It works, but the resolution is pretty bad. I can't even
read the text. Will S-video be much better? Thanks.
8 answers Last reply
More about video versus composite
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Papa wrote:
    > I just tried using my 27-inch TV (CRT) set as a monitor by plugging in a
    > composite (yellow plug) from it to my computer video card composite
    > connector (yellow). It works, but the resolution is pretty bad. I can't even
    > read the text. Will S-video be much better? Thanks.

    Yes, S-Video is better quality than Composite.

    But a standard definition television is inherently low resolution and
    you will never get a picture that looks anything like what you'd get on
    a monitor.

    --
    -WD
  2. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Thanks, Will.

    "Will Dormann" <wdormann@yahoo.com.invalid> wrote in message
    news:3uKdnT80v9mq5y7cRVn-uQ@comcast.com...
    > Papa wrote:
    >> I just tried using my 27-inch TV (CRT) set as a monitor by plugging in a
    >> composite (yellow plug) from it to my computer video card composite
    >> connector (yellow). It works, but the resolution is pretty bad. I can't
    >> even read the text. Will S-video be much better? Thanks.
    >
    > Yes, S-Video is better quality than Composite.
    >
    > But a standard definition television is inherently low resolution and you
    > will never get a picture that looks anything like what you'd get on a
    > monitor.
    >
    > --
    > -WD
  3. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "Papa" <bikingis@my.fun> wrote in message
    news:HyKsd.2219$yr1.473@newsread3.news.pas.earthlink.net...
    > I just tried using my 27-inch TV (CRT) set as a monitor by plugging in a
    > composite (yellow plug) from it to my computer video card composite
    > connector (yellow). It works, but the resolution is pretty bad. I can't
    even
    > read the text. Will S-video be much better? Thanks.
    >
    S-video would not make that much difference. A TV is fine for watching
    video, but not much good to read text / browse websites etc. If you lower
    the resolution of your desktop though, a TV is useable. The most a standard
    TV can handle is 800x600, 640x480 would be easier to read.
    If you are using Nvidia drivers, their support for TV out has improved
    massively over the years - you can independantly set colour, brightness etc
    for the TV, and have yet more independant settings for video playback. The
    drivers do allow you to output a higher resolution desktop, say 1280x720,
    onto a TV, but any text would be almost unreadable...
    Graham
  4. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    No.

    --
    DaveW


    "Papa" <bikingis@my.fun> wrote in message
    news:HyKsd.2219$yr1.473@newsread3.news.pas.earthlink.net...
    >I just tried using my 27-inch TV (CRT) set as a monitor by plugging in a
    >composite (yellow plug) from it to my computer video card composite
    >connector (yellow). It works, but the resolution is pretty bad. I can't
    >even read the text. Will S-video be much better? Thanks.
    >
  5. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "GTS" <gts123NOSPAM@ntlworld.com> wrote in message
    news:TeMsd.682$tw5.175@newsfe4-gui.ntli.net...
    >
    > "Papa" <bikingis@my.fun> wrote in message
    > news:HyKsd.2219$yr1.473@newsread3.news.pas.earthlink.net...
    > > I just tried using my 27-inch TV (CRT) set as a monitor by plugging in a
    > > composite (yellow plug) from it to my computer video card composite
    > > connector (yellow). It works, but the resolution is pretty bad. I can't
    > even
    > > read the text. Will S-video be much better? Thanks.
    > >
    > S-video would not make that much difference. A TV is fine for watching
    > video, but not much good to read text / browse websites etc. If you lower
    > the resolution of your desktop though, a TV is useable. The most a
    standard
    > TV can handle is 800x600, 640x480 would be easier to read.
    > If you are using Nvidia drivers, their support for TV out has improved
    > massively over the years - you can independantly set colour, brightness
    etc
    > for the TV, and have yet more independant settings for video playback. The
    > drivers do allow you to output a higher resolution desktop, say 1280x720,
    > onto a TV, but any text would be almost unreadable...
    > Graham
    >
    >
    I agree with others about Composite and S-Video. Just thought I'd mention
    that the Windows Magnifier makes reading things like file names and check
    boxes possible. If your just doing simple things like watching /capturing
    video it can make a lot of difference.
    HTH
  6. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Thanks everyone. As usual in this NG, great responses, and helpful.

    "Papa" <bikingis@my.fun> wrote in message
    news:HyKsd.2219$yr1.473@newsread3.news.pas.earthlink.net...
    >I just tried using my 27-inch TV (CRT) set as a monitor by plugging in a
    >composite (yellow plug) from it to my computer video card composite
    >connector (yellow). It works, but the resolution is pretty bad. I can't
    >even read the text. Will S-video be much better? Thanks.
    >
  7. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Papa wrote:

    > Thanks everyone. As usual in this NG, great responses, and helpful.

    A few extra tips. I have a small homebuilt HTPC S-Video'd into a 27 incher too.
    I run that 800x600 and large fonts. The large fonts help a lot but can be a
    problem for certain 'large' dialogue boxes so I also have a small 14 inch, 'not
    good for much else', monitor for those purposes (dual head video). Note that
    simply setting the individual fonts to a larger size under the 'appearance' tab
    does not increase the fonts on dialogue boxes whereas the 'large fonts' option
    in display, settings, advanced does (and is why those large dialogue boxes
    sometimes don't 'fit' the 800x600).

    Excessive brightness/contrast (those who wear sunglasses while viewing TV) will
    cause blooming. Not all that big a deal on a 'TV' picture but it severely hurts
    text, especially since you're pushing it with relatively small, by TV standards,
    computer text. High color saturation (those who like screaming neon glow) will
    too as that causes color smearing.

    Theme colors can make a big difference because TV chroma signals don't all have
    the same bandwidth, so some have better resolution than others. Plus, a 'kinda
    difficult to read' color combo on a normal monitor is just so much worse when
    the text is already marginal. The luminance signal has the lion's share of the
    bandwidth so light/dark changes are crisper than color shifts. I.E. black text
    on a white background is a heck of a lot sharper than a uniformly bright red on
    blue.

    See about adjusting your sharpness control. A little 'noise' in the picture
    might be better than 'smoothed' (by low sharpness setting) text and the noise
    will tend to vanish at normal viewing distances anyway. Too much sharpness and
    it'll ghost the edges though. Look for a compromise.

    And, of course, if you have a focus control, optimize that for the
    brightness/contrast setting you decide on (it does vary depending on those).
    Many, if not most, TVs of that size these days don't have a user accessible one
    though.


    > "Papa" <bikingis@my.fun> wrote in message
    > news:HyKsd.2219$yr1.473@newsread3.news.pas.earthlink.net...
    >
    >>I just tried using my 27-inch TV (CRT) set as a monitor by plugging in a
    >>composite (yellow plug) from it to my computer video card composite
    >>connector (yellow). It works, but the resolution is pretty bad. I can't
    >>even read the text. Will S-video be much better? Thanks.
    >>
    >
    >
    >
  8. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Great advice. Thanks, David.
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