Please suggest power supply

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

I need two power supplies. (Go figure ... two machines lost them
simultaneously!)

Specs:
- 2 hard disks
- AMD Athlon XP 2800+ Processor
- ASUS Mainboard / Gigabyte Mainboard (different boxes)
- ATI 9600XT / GeForce 4MX (different boxes)
- One box has a SCSI board and SCSI tape drive.


What RELIABLE power supply do I need that I won't have to replace in 18
months?

Any help would be appreciated. Thanks!
23 answers Last reply
More about please suggest power supply
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Take a look at some from Fortron.

    "SinghaLvr" <singhalvr@charter.net> wrote in message
    news:0001HW.BDED1BC90017962EF04075B0@news-50.giganews.com...
    > I need two power supplies. (Go figure ... two machines lost them
    > simultaneously!)
    >
    > Specs:
    > - 2 hard disks
    > - AMD Athlon XP 2800+ Processor
    > - ASUS Mainboard / Gigabyte Mainboard (different boxes)
    > - ATI 9600XT / GeForce 4MX (different boxes)
    > - One box has a SCSI board and SCSI tape drive.
    >
    >
    > What RELIABLE power supply do I need that I won't have to replace in 18
    > months?
    >
    > Any help would be appreciated. Thanks!
    >
  2. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    If the recommendation is for 'more watts', then ignore that
    response immediately. Any acceptable power supply of 350
    watts is more than sufficient. Too many power supplies are
    sold missing essential functions. They make themselves
    obvious by providing no long list of numerical specs AND sell
    for less than $65 retail. An example of what a minimally
    acceptable power supply will provide as specs:
    Specification compliance: ATX 2.03 & ATX12V v1.1
    Short circuit protection on all outputs
    Over voltage protection
    Over power protection
    100% hi-pot test
    100% burn in, high temperature cycled on/off
    PFC harmonics compliance: EN61000-3-2 + A1 + A2
    EMI/RFI compliance: CE, CISPR22 & FCC part 15 class B
    Safety compliance: VDE, TUV, D, N, S, Fi, UL, C-UL & CB
    Hold up time, full load: 16ms. typical
    Efficiency; 100-120VAC and full range: >65%
    Dielectric withstand, input to frame/ground: 1800VAC, 1sec.
    Dielectric withstand, input to output: 1800VAC, 1sec.
    Ripple/noise: 1%
    MTBF, full load @ 25°C amb.: >100k hrs

    Notice this very abridge list has specs with numbers. That
    is where you begin your search. Many of the important
    features in this above list are routinely missing is $25 and
    $40 power supplies. Instead they sell to naive hyping 400 and
    550 watt power - which many do not even provide.

    No numerical specs? How to dump inferior power supplies
    into North America where too many computer assemblers don't
    even know what the avoid numbers mean.

    SinghaLvr wrote:
    > I need two power supplies. (Go figure ... two machines lost them
    > simultaneously!)
    >
    > Specs:
    > - 2 hard disks
    > - AMD Athlon XP 2800+ Processor
    > - ASUS Mainboard / Gigabyte Mainboard (different boxes)
    > - ATI 9600XT / GeForce 4MX (different boxes)
    > - One box has a SCSI board and SCSI tape drive.
    >
    > What RELIABLE power supply do I need that I won't have to replace in 18
    > months?
    >
    > Any help would be appreciated. Thanks!
  3. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Correction:
    > even know what the *above* numbers mean.

    w_tom wrote:
    > ...
    > No numerical specs? How to dump inferior power supplies
    > into North America where too many computer assemblers don't
    > even know what the avoid numbers mean.
  4. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    SinghaLvr wrote:

    > I need two power supplies. (Go figure ... two machines lost them
    > simultaneously!)
    >
    > Specs:
    > - 2 hard disks
    > - AMD Athlon XP 2800+ Processor
    > - ASUS Mainboard / Gigabyte Mainboard (different boxes)
    > - ATI 9600XT / GeForce 4MX (different boxes)
    > - One box has a SCSI board and SCSI tape drive.
    >
    >
    > What RELIABLE power supply do I need that I won't have to replace in
    18
    > months?

    http://takaman.jp has probably the best power estimator available, and
    it gives not only the watts but also the amps at each voltage, but its
    +3.3V amp estimates seem to be way too low and should be tripled. A
    good 350W or a really good 300W PSU should be able to run everything
    you have. Few PSU reviews are good, with some of the few exceptions
    being at www.tomshardware.com , www.silentpcreview.com , and
    www.xbitlabs.com.

    Are you near a Fry's Electronics? They often feature an Antec at a
    really cheap price, after rebate, like the case SKL1600 case w/ 300W
    for $5 a few weeks ago (was $15 last week) or the 350W PSU for $15 back
    in Sept. I expect them to have another such special on Dec. 26. Antec
    increased the +12V amp capacity of these, to 19A for the 300W and to
    21A for the 350W, but they haven't updated their website for this. The
    newer 300W has bigger high voltage MOSFETs than my old one, 9.0A verses
    6.5A. In comparison, my 350W Enermax has just a single 9A MOSFET.

    Fortron-Source makes PSUs that are at least as good as Antecs but
    usually cheaper, like $25 for a 300W from www.newegg.com. They produce
    several brands, including Sparkle, Hi-Q, PowerQ, Powerman, PowerTech,
    Trend, Aopen, and sometimes CasEdge.

    Brands used by big computer makers are really good, except those in
    some E-machines. They include Lite-on, Delta, HEC/Heroichi/CompuCase,
    Zippy-Emacs, NMB/Mineba, and Win-tact. Another one of these companies,
    Channel Well Technology, the producer of most Antecs, is all over the
    place on quality, but their good ones are labelled CWT-xxxAyy or
    CWT-xxxByy, where xxx = watts and yy = AS, BS, AD, BD, ADP, or BDP.
    Avoid their products labelled CWT-xxxATX, CWT-xxxISO, or CWT-xxx.

    PC Power & Cooling is supposedly the best but also the most expensive.
    The basic cores of their PSUs are by Zippy-Emacs, Fortron-Source, and
    Win-tact.

    It's OK to use Enermax (Casemart, Wavesonic, Cooler Giant) or Sirtec
    (Thermaltake, High Power, several other brands).

    Avoid Leadman (makes Robanton, Raidmax, and Powmax), Q-tec (not to be
    confused with Q-technology, which are beefed-up Fortron-Source),
    EZ-Media, Transworld, King Case, and anything by Deer (Austin, Allied,
    Codegen, L&C, Logic, PowerUp, PowerStar, Duro, US-Can, Eagle, Foxlink,
    Foxconn, Hyena, Qmax, Mercury).
  5. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    w_tom wrote:

    > Any acceptable power supply of 350 watts is more than sufficient.
    > Too many power supplies are sold missing essential functions.
    > They make themselves obvious by providing no long list of
    > numerical specs AND sell for less than $65 retail. An example
    > of what a minimally acceptable power supply will provide as specs:
    > Specification compliance: ATX 2.03 & ATX12V v1.1
    > Short circuit protection on all outputs
    > Over voltage protection
    > Over power protection
    > 100% hi-pot test
    > 100% burn in, high temperature cycled on/off
    > PFC harmonics compliance: EN61000-3-2 + A1 + A2
    > EMI/RFI compliance: CE, CISPR22 & FCC part 15 class B
    > Safety compliance: VDE, TUV, D, N, S, Fi, UL, C-UL & CB
    > Hold up time, full load: 16ms. typical
    > Efficiency; 100-120VAC and full range: >65%
    > Dielectric withstand, input to frame/ground: 1800VAC, 1sec.
    > Dielectric withstand, input to output: 1800VAC, 1sec.
    > Ripple/noise: 1%
    > MTBF, full load @ 25°C amb.: >100k hrs
    >
    > Notice this very abridge list has specs with numbers. That
    > is where you begin your search. Many of the important
    > features in this above list are routinely missing is $25 and
    > $40 power supplies. Instead they sell to naive hyping 400 and
    > 550 watt power - which many do not even provide.
    >
    > No numerical specs? How to dump inferior power supplies
    > into North America where too many computer assemblers don't
    > even know what the avoid numbers mean.

    How can a regular consumer know if those claims are true? It's hard to
    get answers from most manufacturers, even the best.

    I had a 250W PSU with all those specs and features, but its +5V standby
    supply circuit board was held on with only one screw and could swivel
    to short high voltage against a heatsink, and its short protection
    didn't protect the +3.3V output transistor. This brand was so bad that
    PC Power & Cooling used the 300W version as an example of what a bad
    PSU was like:
    www.pcpowercooling.com/products/power_supplies/insidestory/

    I haven't paid more than $25 for a PSU in the past two years ($25 price
    included the case), but I've never bought junk, except for a free case
    & PSU. All the others were quality brands -- Antec, Forton/Sparkle,
    and Enermax.
  6. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    SinghaLvr:

    > What RELIABLE power supply do I need that I won't have to replace in 18
    > months?

    Many people like Antec.

    Here is all you need:
    http://www.hardforum.com/forumdisplay.php?f=93

    --
    Mac Cool
  7. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    seasonic super silencer if noise is at all a concern.
    fortron if you want something less expensive but still very good.

    "SinghaLvr" <singhalvr@charter.net> wrote in message
    news:0001HW.BDED1BC90017962EF04075B0@news-50.giganews.com...
    > I need two power supplies. (Go figure ... two machines lost them
    > simultaneously!)
    >
    > Specs:
    > - 2 hard disks
    > - AMD Athlon XP 2800+ Processor
    > - ASUS Mainboard / Gigabyte Mainboard (different boxes)
    > - ATI 9600XT / GeForce 4MX (different boxes)
    > - One box has a SCSI board and SCSI tape drive.
    >
    >
    > What RELIABLE power supply do I need that I won't have to replace in 18
    > months?
    >
    > Any help would be appreciated. Thanks!
    >
  8. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    willard.myron@myron.NOSPAM.co.uk wrote:

    > > PC Power & Cooling is supposedly the best but also the most
    expensive.
    > > The basic cores of their PSUs are by Zippy-Emacs, Fortron-Source,
    and
    > > Win-tact.
    > >
    >
    > I'd be interested to know how you came by this information....

    Several people have mentioned that the lower powered ones are based on
    Fortron-Source (they look like it, except for the heatsinks) and the
    higher powered ones on Zippy-Emacs designs I read the Win-tact - PCP&C
    connection while trying to find out who made CompUSA PSUs (varies by
    the week), but I can't confirm it. I even saw a picture of a PCP&C
    where the transformer had either the Seasonic or Nazi SS logo on it,
    but I don't know if that means they made the whole PC board or just the
    transformer.
  9. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    willard.myron@myron.NOSPAM.co.uk wrote:
    > On 21-Dec-2004, "larry moe 'n curly" <larrymoencurly@my-deja.com>
    wrote:

    > > I had a 250W PSU with all those specs and features, but its +5V
    standby
    > > supply circuit board was held on with only one screw and could
    swivel
    > > to short high voltage against a heatsink, and its short protection
    > > didn't protect the +3.3V output transistor. This brand was so bad
    that
    > > PC Power & Cooling used the 300W version as an example of what a
    bad
    > > PSU was like:
    > > www.pcpowercooling.com/products/power_supplies/insidestory/
    > >
    > > I haven't paid more than $25 for a PSU in the past two years ($25
    price
    > > included the case), but I've never bought junk,

    > On the subject of "PC Power & Cooling", I'm currently using an
    Enermax,
    > 550W, EG651P-VE:
    > http://www.maxpoint.com/products/pow_supp/spec_pg/65124p/index.htm
    >
    > The Enermax, 550W, EG651P-VE is the "so called 550" power unit that
    "PC
    > Power & Cooling" is referring to here:
    > http://www.pcpowercooling.com/pdf/Turbo-Cool_510_vs.pdf
    >
    > I'm currently using my "550" to power a 3Ghz Pentium Prescott LGA775
    > processor. However, before I upgraded my system to a Pentium 4, I
    used it to
    > power a 500Mhz Pentium 3. Now I've had this PSU for over 2 years. For
    the
    > last year it has been left on continually powering the P3!. So the
    question
    > is: Is this PSU as bad as "PC Power & Cooling" make it out to be?. It
    worked
    > OK when I was using a P3. It still works OK with my new P4 system,
    and it's
    > now over 2 years old!.
    >
    > Oh, and as for it's supposed lack of PFC (Power Factor Correction). I
    really
    > do wonder how necessary Active PFC really is?, and is including it in
    a PSU
    > design just an excuse to inflate the price of the manufactures
    PSU's?.
    >
    > Enermax were obviously so stung by this criticism that they now
    produce
    > their own range of Active PFC PSU's:

    I'm no expert and have never seen any other test results, but I think
    that PCP&C is right but that it doesn't matter for most people because
    very few computers ever need more than 250W. For example, one person
    with a 64-bit CPU, Radeon 9800 graphics, a couple of optical drives,
    and four HDs (two of them 10,000 RPM) measured the power consumpting
    from the AC outlet and found it was usually 300W and never exceeded
    400W, meaning the PSU probably put out only about 225-300W.

    >From what I've read, PFC is helpful to the consumer for only two
    reasons:

    1) Active PFC circuitry prevents the user from accidentally blowing up
    the PSU by flipping the 115V/230V voltage selector switch the wrong way
    in a country where wall outlets put out 220V or more;

    2) An UPS with a lower VA rating can be used because with active PFC,
    watts and VA are almost the same.
  10. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    willard.myron@myron.NOSPAM.co.uk wrote:

    > > PC Power & Cooling is supposedly the best but also the most
    expensive.
    > > The basic cores of their PSUs are by Zippy-Emacs, Fortron-Source,
    and
    > > Win-tact.
    > >
    >
    > I'd be interested to know how you came by this information....

    Several people have mentioned that the lower powered ones are based on
    Fortron-Source (they look like it, except for the heatsinks) and the
    higher powered ones on Zippy-Emacs designs I read the Win-tact - PCP&C
    connection while trying to find out who made CompUSA PSUs (varies by
    the week), but I can't confirm it. I even saw a picture of a PCP&C
    where the transformer had either the Seasonic or Nazi SS logo on it,
    but I don't know if that means they made the whole PC board or just the
    transformer.
  11. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    On 21-Dec-2004, "larry moe 'n curly" <larrymoencurly@my-deja.com> wrote:

    > w_tom wrote:
    >
    > > Any acceptable power supply of 350 watts is more than sufficient.
    > > Too many power supplies are sold missing essential functions.
    > > They make themselves obvious by providing no long list of
    > > numerical specs AND sell for less than $65 retail. An example
    > > of what a minimally acceptable power supply will provide as specs:
    > > Specification compliance: ATX 2.03 & ATX12V v1.1
    > > Short circuit protection on all outputs
    > > Over voltage protection
    > > Over power protection
    > > 100% hi-pot test
    > > 100% burn in, high temperature cycled on/off
    > > PFC harmonics compliance: EN61000-3-2 + A1 + A2
    > > EMI/RFI compliance: CE, CISPR22 & FCC part 15 class B
    > > Safety compliance: VDE, TUV, D, N, S, Fi, UL, C-UL & CB
    > > Hold up time, full load: 16ms. typical
    > > Efficiency; 100-120VAC and full range: >65%
    > > Dielectric withstand, input to frame/ground: 1800VAC, 1sec.
    > > Dielectric withstand, input to output: 1800VAC, 1sec.
    > > Ripple/noise: 1%
    > > MTBF, full load @ 25°C amb.: >100k hrs
    > >
    > > Notice this very abridge list has specs with numbers. That
    > > is where you begin your search. Many of the important
    > > features in this above list are routinely missing is $25 and
    > > $40 power supplies. Instead they sell to naive hyping 400 and
    > > 550 watt power - which many do not even provide.
    > >
    > > No numerical specs? How to dump inferior power supplies
    > > into North America where too many computer assemblers don't
    > > even know what the avoid numbers mean.
    >
    > How can a regular consumer know if those claims are true? It's hard to
    > get answers from most manufacturers, even the best.
    >
    > I had a 250W PSU with all those specs and features, but its +5V standby
    > supply circuit board was held on with only one screw and could swivel
    > to short high voltage against a heatsink, and its short protection
    > didn't protect the +3.3V output transistor. This brand was so bad that
    > PC Power & Cooling used the 300W version as an example of what a bad
    > PSU was like:
    > www.pcpowercooling.com/products/power_supplies/insidestory/
    >
    > I haven't paid more than $25 for a PSU in the past two years ($25 price
    > included the case), but I've never bought junk, except for a free case
    > & PSU. All the others were quality brands -- Antec, Forton/Sparkle,
    > and Enermax.

    On the subject of "PC Power & Cooling", I'm currently using an Enermax,
    550W, EG651P-VE:
    http://www.maxpoint.com/products/pow_supp/spec_pg/65124p/index.htm

    The Enermax, 550W, EG651P-VE is the "so called 550" power unit that "PC
    Power & Cooling" is referring to here:
    http://www.pcpowercooling.com/pdf/Turbo-Cool_510_vs.pdf

    I'm currently using my "550" to power a 3Ghz Pentium Prescott LGA775
    processor. However, before I upgraded my system to a Pentium 4, I used it to
    power a 500Mhz Pentium 3. Now I've had this PSU for over 2 years. For the
    last year it has been left on continually powering the P3!. So the question
    is: Is this PSU as bad as "PC Power & Cooling" make it out to be?. It worked
    OK when I was using a P3. It still works OK with my new P4 system, and it's
    now over 2 years old!.

    Oh, and as for it's supposed lack of PFC (Power Factor Correction). I really
    do wonder how necessary Active PFC really is?, and is including it in a PSU
    design just an excuse to inflate the price of the manufactures PSU's?.

    Enermax were obviously so stung by this criticism that they now produce
    their own range of Active PFC PSU's:
    http://www.maxpoint.com/products/pow_supp/spec_pg/noisetakerAX/index.htm

    At the end of the day it all boils down to this. How many watts do you need,
    and how much are you willing to pay. Because as the old saying goes, "you
    get what you pay for".
  12. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    > PC Power & Cooling is supposedly the best but also the most expensive.
    > The basic cores of their PSUs are by Zippy-Emacs, Fortron-Source, and
    > Win-tact.
    >

    I'd be interested to know how you came by this information....
  13. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    willard.myron@myron.NOSPAM.co.uk wrote:

    > > PC Power & Cooling is supposedly the best but also the most expensive.
    > > The basic cores of their PSUs are by Zippy-Emacs, Fortron-Source, and
    > > Win-tact.
    > >
    >
    > I'd be interested to know how you came by this information....

    Urban myth. According to an email I got from the GM at PCP&C, it's not
    true. But, the myth lives on. He *did* say that they used one of those
    brands (don't remember which one) as the core in their old, low cost
    235w model.
  14. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Antec. The most conservatively rated, most durable power supplies on the
    market for the money.

    --
    DaveW


    "SinghaLvr" <singhalvr@charter.net> wrote in message
    news:0001HW.BDED1BC90017962EF04075B0@news-50.giganews.com...
    >I need two power supplies. (Go figure ... two machines lost them
    > simultaneously!)
    >
    > Specs:
    > - 2 hard disks
    > - AMD Athlon XP 2800+ Processor
    > - ASUS Mainboard / Gigabyte Mainboard (different boxes)
    > - ATI 9600XT / GeForce 4MX (different boxes)
    > - One box has a SCSI board and SCSI tape drive.
    >
    >
    > What RELIABLE power supply do I need that I won't have to replace in 18
    > months?
    >
    > Any help would be appreciated. Thanks!
    >
  15. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    On Tue, 21 Dec 2004 01:44:02 -0500, Mac Cool wrote
    (in article <Xns95C611AD9120AMacCool@24.25.9.41>):

    > Subject: Re: Please suggest power supply
    > From: Mac Cool <Mac@2cool.com>
    > Date: Yesterday 1:44 AM
    > Newsgroups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
    >
    > SinghaLvr:
    >
    >> What RELIABLE power supply do I need that I won't have to replace in 18
    >> months?
    >
    > Many people like Antec.
    >
    > Here is all you need:
    > http://www.hardforum.com/forumdisplay.php?f=93
    >
    >

    Awesome!

    Thanks!


    (Thanks to everyone who responded to this thread!)
  16. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    On Tue, 21 Dec 2004 05:37:55 -0500, larry moe 'n curly wrote
    (in article <1103625475.945374.76070@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com>):

    > Are you near a Fry's Electronics? They often feature an Antec at a
    > really cheap price, after rebate, like the case SKL1600 case w/ 300W
    > for $5 a few weeks ago (was $15 last week) or the 350W PSU for $15 back
    > in Sept. I expect them to have another such special on Dec. 26. Antec
    > increased the +12V amp capacity of these, to 19A for the 300W and to
    > 21A for the 350W, but they haven't updated their website for this. The
    > newer 300W has bigger high voltage MOSFETs than my old one, 9.0A verses
    > 6.5A. In comparison, my 350W Enermax has just a single 9A MOSFET.

    Actually I do .... they just opened one a few weeks ago.

    I stopped there before posting this thread but the selection was so great
    with such a wide price range that I didn't even know where to begin. Like
    most retail stores it was nearly impossible to find someone to help. (And
    I'm not sure how helpful they would be anyway).

    I need two power supplies, one immediately so if I can find something at
    Fry's that will get my one box back up and running ... the second one can
    wait for mail order. (It still works, but is very loud at the moment ... the
    fan bearings are going bad in the PS ... the primary one that I need now only
    boots when it feels like it ... 2 or 3 power cycles seems to get it up but
    that can't be a good thing.)
  17. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    ric wrote:

    > > PC Power & Cooling is supposedly the best but also the
    > > most expensive. The basic cores of their PSUs are by
    > > Zippy-Emacs, Fortron-Source, and Win-tact.

    > Urban myth. According to an email I got from the GM at PCP&C, it's
    not
    > true. But, the myth lives on. He *did* say that they used one of
    those
    > brands (don't remember which one) as the core in their old, low cost
    > 235w model.

    Did he say whether they designed their current models from the ground
    up or used another company's basic designs?
  18. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    SinghaLvr wrote:
    > On Tue, 21 Dec 2004 05:37:55 -0500, larry moe 'n curly wrote
    > (in article <1103625475.945374.76070@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com>):
    >
    > > Are you near a Fry's Electronics? They often feature an Antec at a
    > > really cheap price, after rebate, like the case SKL1600 case w/
    300W
    > > for $5 a few weeks ago (was $15 last week) or the 350W PSU for $15
    back
    > > in Sept. I expect them to have another such special on Dec. 26.

    > Actually I do .... they just opened one a few weeks ago.
    >
    > I stopped there before posting this thread but the selection was so
    great
    > with such a wide price range that I didn't even know where to begin.
    Like
    > most retail stores it was nearly impossible to find someone to help.
    (And
    > I'm not sure how helpful they would be anyway).
    >
    > I need two power supplies, one immediately so if I can find something
    at
    > Fry's that will get my one box back up and running ... the second one
    can
    > wait for mail order. (It still works, but is very loud at the moment
    .... the
    > fan bearings are going bad in the PS ... the primary one that I need
    now only
    > boots when it feels like it ... 2 or 3 power cycles seems to get it
    up but
    > that can't be a good thing.)

    Generally Fry's isn't very cheap for PSUs, except when they feature a
    rebate deal on an Antec or Enermax, so at other times it's better to
    get a $19-45 Fortron-Source, AKA Sparkle, Hi-Q, PowerQ, from
    www.newegg.com. When I need help at Fry's, I usually ask one of the
    knowledgeable customers there. BTW, red tags indicate close-out items
    that may be very cheap, and a long line doesn't necessarily mean a long
    wait because their line tends to move fast.
  19. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    On Wed, 22 Dec 2004 19:07:35 -0500, larry moe 'n curly wrote
    (in article <1103760455.754381.230800@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com>):

    > Generally Fry's isn't very cheap for PSUs, except when they feature a
    > rebate deal on an Antec or Enermax, so at other times it's better to
    > get a $19-45 Fortron-Source, AKA Sparkle, Hi-Q, PowerQ, from
    > www.newegg.com. When I need help at Fry's, I usually ask one of the
    > knowledgeable customers there. BTW, red tags indicate close-out items
    > that may be very cheap, and a long line doesn't necessarily mean a long
    > wait because their line tends to move fast.

    Some good advice .... thank you.
  20. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    larry moe 'n curly wrote:

    > > > PC Power & Cooling is supposedly the best but also the
    > > > most expensive. The basic cores of their PSUs are by
    > > > Zippy-Emacs, Fortron-Source, and Win-tact.
    >
    > > Urban myth. According to an email I got from the GM at PCP&C, it's
    > not
    > > true. But, the myth lives on. He *did* say that they used one of
    > those
    > > brands (don't remember which one) as the core in their old, low cost
    > > 235w model.
    >
    > Did he say whether they designed their current models from the ground
    > up or used another company's basic designs?

    As before, core units (or PCBs) are outsourced to be built to
    PCP&C's specifications. All final assembly, inspection and tests
    are conducted at PCP&C. I have toured their plant and have seen
    this procedure.
  21. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    On 21-Dec-2004, "larry moe 'n curly" <larrymoencurly@my-deja.com> wrote:

    > I'm no expert and have never seen any other test results, but I think
    > that PCP&C is right but that it doesn't matter for most people because
    > very few computers ever need more than 250W. For example, one person
    > with a 64-bit CPU, Radeon 9800 graphics, a couple of optical drives,
    > and four HDs (two of them 10,000 RPM) measured the power consumpting
    > from the AC outlet and found it was usually 300W and never exceeded
    > 400W, meaning the PSU probably put out only about 225-300W.

    300W to 400W?, are you sure they didn't mean 300 to 400VA?.

    200 to 300W sounds reasonable if you include say the monitor. Assuming that
    the monitor is being powered via a power out socket on the PSU.

    I measured my PSU's mains power consumption this afternoon, and found that
    it was around 306VA. That works out at around 193W. Add the monitor and it
    went up to around 418VA, which works out at around 263W.

    >
    > >From what I've read, PFC is helpful to the consumer for only two
    > reasons:
    >
    > 1) Active PFC circuitry prevents the user from accidentally blowing up
    > the PSU by flipping the 115V/230V voltage selector switch the wrong way
    > in a country where wall outlets put out 220V or more;

    Useful, but not essential! ;-)

    >
    > 2) An UPS with a lower VA rating can be used because with active PFC,
    > watts and VA are almost the same.
  22. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    ric wrote:
    > larry moe 'n curly wrote:

    > > PC Power & Cooling is supposedly the best but also the
    > > most expensive. The basic cores of their PSUs are by
    > > Zippy-Emacs, Fortron-Source, and Win-tact.

    > Urban myth. According to an email I got from the GM at
    > PCP&C, it's not true. But, the myth lives on. He *did*
    > say that they used one of those brands (don't remember
    > which one) as the core in their old, low cost 235w model.
    > >
    > > Did he say whether they designed their current models
    > > from the ground up or used another company's basic designs?
    >
    > As before, core units (or PCBs) are outsourced to be built to
    > PCP&C's specifications. All final assembly, inspection and tests
    > are conducted at PCP&C. I have toured their plant and have seen
    > this procedure.

    I thought that everybody used outside PC board makers, but whose
    designs are the core units in the first place?
  23. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    larry moe 'n curly wrote:

    > > As before, core units (or PCBs) are outsourced to be built to
    > > PCP&C's specifications. All final assembly, inspection and tests
    > > are conducted at PCP&C. I have toured their plant and have seen
    > > this procedure.
    >
    > I thought that everybody used outside PC board makers, but whose
    > designs are the core units in the first place?

    That answer is part of the "to PCP&C's specifications" above.
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