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4200 RPM drive fast enough?

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December 22, 2004 7:32:43 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,comp.laptops,rec.video,rec.video.dvd.tech (More info?)

Just wondering if this 60 G hard drive is sufficient to do basic video
editing on a laptop and burn to dvd?

More about : 4200 rpm drive fast

Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b D Laptop
December 22, 2004 7:32:44 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,comp.laptops,rec.video,rec.video.dvd.tech (More info?)

That depends on the laptop. Please provide specs.

"Mark" <none@none.com> wrote in message
news:LN6yd.540623$Pl.538215@pd7tw1no...
> Just wondering if this 60 G hard drive is sufficient to do basic video
> editing on a laptop and burn to dvd?
>
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b D Laptop
December 22, 2004 7:48:07 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,comp.laptops,rec.video,rec.video.dvd.tech (More info?)

"Mark" <none@none.com> wrote:

>Just wondering if this 60 G hard drive

Did you forget the link?








>is sufficient to do basic video editing on a laptop and burn to
>dvd?
>
>
>
>
>Path: newssvr30.news.prodigy.com!newsdbm05.news.prodigy.com!newscon03.news.prodigy.com!newsmst01a.news.prodigy.com!prodigy.com!border1.nntp.dca.giganews.com!nntp.giganews.com!pd7cy2so!pd7cy1no!shaw.ca!pd7tw1no.POSTED!53ab2750!not-for-mail
>X-Trace-PostClient-IP: 24.85.131.226
>From: "Mark" <none@none.com>
>Newsgroups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,comp.laptops,rec.video,rec.video.dvd.tech
>Subject: 4200 RPM drive fast enough?
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>
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December 22, 2004 8:17:07 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,comp.laptops,rec.video,rec.video.dvd.tech (More info?)

"Mark" <none@none.com> wrote in message
news:LN6yd.540623$Pl.538215@pd7tw1no...
> Just wondering if this 60 G hard drive is sufficient to do basic video
> editing on a laptop and burn to dvd?
>
>

although a slow drive like that is not ideal
it should still work, depending on how much ram you have
December 22, 2004 8:51:46 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,comp.laptops,rec.video,rec.video.dvd.tech (More info?)

"John Doe" <jdoe@usenet.is.the.real.thing> wrote in message
news:Xns95C6E7F4D5811wisdomfolly@151.164.30.42...
> "Mark" <none@none.com> wrote:
>
>>Just wondering if this 60 G hard drive
>
> Did you forget the link?

Actually, I didn't. A minor typo on my part. Just wondering if a 60 G 4200
rpm hard drive is fast enough
December 22, 2004 12:51:24 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

"Mark" <none@none.com> wrote:

>Just wondering if this 60 G hard drive is sufficient to do basic video
>editing on a laptop and burn to dvd?
>


Almost certainly yes but if you wanted to capture you may have problems.

Another possible problem is that Laptops are not always designed to run at
100% CPU for long periods of time and they may overheat, this is very model
specific so may not be a problem but something to bear in mind.

Hope this helps

Andy
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b D Laptop
December 22, 2004 3:30:53 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,comp.laptops,rec.video,rec.video.dvd.tech (More info?)

Everything I have read says 7200 or better.

Regards,

Marv

Mark wrote:
> Just wondering if this 60 G hard drive is sufficient to do basic video
> editing on a laptop and burn to dvd?
>
>
December 22, 2004 10:22:22 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

On Wed, 22 Dec 2004 04:32:43 GMT, "Mark" <none@none.com> wrote:

>Just wondering if this 60 G hard drive is sufficient to do basic video
>editing on a laptop and burn to dvd?
>

It should work and do in a pinch, but I wouldn't want to work with it
for too long. Your patience may vary.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b D Laptop
December 22, 2004 11:10:58 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,comp.laptops,rec.video,rec.video.dvd.tech (More info?)

On Wed, 22 Dec 2004 05:51:46 GMT, "Mark" <none@none.com> wrote:

>
>"John Doe" <jdoe@usenet.is.the.real.thing> wrote in message
>news:Xns95C6E7F4D5811wisdomfolly@151.164.30.42...
>> "Mark" <none@none.com> wrote:
>>
>>>Just wondering if this 60 G hard drive
>>
>> Did you forget the link?
>
>Actually, I didn't. A minor typo on my part. Just wondering if a 60 G 4200
>rpm hard drive is fast enough
>
You'll notice it. My last laptop had a 5400 RPM drive (as opposed to
the 7200 RPM external I have) and I definitely saw a difference. As to
whether it will work for you, it depends on whether you're going to be
doing a lot of disk-intensive stuff like database-involved apps, etc.
December 23, 2004 3:26:57 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,comp.laptops,rec.video,rec.video.dvd.tech (More info?)

I have a Toshiba S509 P4 2.8 laptop. It has 512 ram and a Gforce to go card.
My HDD is an 80 GB @ 4200 RPM on XP HE and I have done DVD burning, editing
etc.. with no problems.

ray


"Mark" <none@none.com> wrote in message
news:LN6yd.540623$Pl.538215@pd7tw1no...
> Just wondering if this 60 G hard drive is sufficient to do basic video
> editing on a laptop and burn to dvd?
>
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b D Laptop
December 23, 2004 5:29:02 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,comp.laptops,rec.video,rec.video.dvd.tech (More info?)

On Thu, 23 Dec 2004 00:26:57 GMT, "Ray" <vze2995vnospam@verizon.net>
wrote:

>I have a Toshiba S509 P4 2.8 laptop. It has 512 ram and a Gforce to go card.
>My HDD is an 80 GB @ 4200 RPM on XP HE and I have done DVD burning, editing
>etc.. with no problems.
>
>ray
>
>
>"Mark" <none@none.com> wrote in message
>news:LN6yd.540623$Pl.538215@pd7tw1no...
>> Just wondering if this 60 G hard drive is sufficient to do basic video
>> editing on a laptop and burn to dvd?
>>
>


Editing should not be a problem but have you captured from a DV
firewire camera?? If not try it and you problably see a problem with
dropped frames.
December 23, 2004 7:30:17 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,comp.laptops,rec.video,rec.video.dvd.tech (More info?)

"luminos" <logos1@trip.net> wrote in message
news:10si6g0tesd2jde@news20.forteinc.com...
: That depends on the laptop. Please provide specs.

Oops. P4 2.8G (nonhyperthreading), 512 RAM.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b D Laptop
December 23, 2004 7:30:18 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,comp.laptops,rec.video,rec.video.dvd.tech (More info?)

You will be able to edit. Capturing will depend on your hardware.

"Mark" <none@none.com> wrote in message
news:tRryd.568869$%k.326363@pd7tw2no...
> "luminos" <logos1@trip.net> wrote in message
> news:10si6g0tesd2jde@news20.forteinc.com...
> : That depends on the laptop. Please provide specs.
>
> Oops. P4 2.8G (nonhyperthreading), 512 RAM.
>
>
>
December 23, 2004 7:37:39 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,comp.laptops,rec.video,rec.video.dvd.tech (More info?)

no dropped frames?

"Ray" <vze2995vnospam@verizon.net> wrote in message
news:lhoyd.8232$EL5.4876@trndny09...
:I have a Toshiba S509 P4 2.8 laptop. It has 512 ram and a Gforce to
go card.
: My HDD is an 80 GB @ 4200 RPM on XP HE and I have done DVD burning,
editing
: etc.. with no problems.
December 23, 2004 7:37:39 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,comp.laptops,rec.video,rec.video.dvd.tech (More info?)

"Donald Link" <linkd@mindspring.com> wrote in message
news:b6bks0pvn6havbcqni0djm9uvj61e8aoov@4ax.com...
:
:
: Editing should not be a problem but have you captured from a DV
: firewire camera?? If not try it and you problably see a problem
with
: dropped frames.

Oh no, I haven't done the capture yet from a firewire! That's my
concern, dropped frames , rendering and audio mismatch.
So, with a 4200 rpm drive this will be an issue? Would it help if I
used an external 7200 rpm drive to capture and to and then copy it to
my local h/d and then swap the external drive and install a dvd in the
external case?
December 23, 2004 7:37:40 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,comp.laptops,rec.video,rec.video.dvd.tech (More info?)

On Thu, 23 Dec 2004 04:37:39 GMT, "Mark" <none@none.com> wrote:

>
>"Donald Link" <linkd@mindspring.com> wrote in message
>news:b6bks0pvn6havbcqni0djm9uvj61e8aoov@4ax.com...
>:
>:
>: Editing should not be a problem but have you captured from a DV
>: firewire camera?? If not try it and you problably see a problem
>with
>: dropped frames.
>
>Oh no, I haven't done the capture yet from a firewire! That's my
>concern, dropped frames , rendering and audio mismatch.
>So, with a 4200 rpm drive this will be an issue? Would it help if I
>used an external 7200 rpm drive to capture and to and then copy it to
>my local h/d and then swap the external drive and install a dvd in the
>external case?
>
Yes it WILL be a problem. Use a 7200rpm drive with at least a 100mhz
FSB IDE controller.(I recommend using a 133mhz controller.) to capture
your video.
Once you have it on a HD you can edit it and burn to DVD no
problem.(Helps to have sufficient buffer rate though.)
December 23, 2004 8:46:57 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,comp.laptops,rec.video,rec.video.dvd.tech (More info?)

"none" <none@none.net> wrote in message
news:3qjks0tn8l25suubkgski07akhj1746tg1@4ax.com...
:: Yes it WILL be a problem. Use a 7200rpm drive with at least a 100mhz
: FSB IDE controller.(I recommend using a 133mhz controller.) to capture
: your video.

The h/d that I would be using is an internal mounted inside an external
USB 2.0 case. I don't know hot to translate the FSB speed to a USB
equivalent. The USB 2.0 is suppose to be fast but I don't know how it
would compare to 100 mhz, but the WD hard drive is ATA 100 only. The
other option may be to do the video capture on a 1.8G Celeron computer
and then remove the drive and hook it up to the USB and transfer it to
the laptop.
December 23, 2004 9:10:04 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,comp.laptops,rec.video,rec.video.dvd.tech (More info?)

: Will it work, yes, but it will be painfully slow. A few of the
reasons they
: use those slow as molasses drives in notebooks is for reduced heat and
power
: consumption. Other than that, the slow drives kill the performance of
the
: notebooks.

I know, I noticed that speed issue right away just booting up, disk
defraging, and copying CD's. Unfortunately, at this time it is not
worthwhile for me to upgrade my new drive in the laptop to a 80 or 100G
5400 rpm drive until the drives are less expensive. That's one reason
why I ordered a WD 200G 7200 rpm drive. In fact, I am only using 8G
right now for apps and data. I can always buy an external case and
house the hard drive and swap a DVD drive as need be, but I can't run
both at the same time unless I have two external USB cases. I dunno how
that will affect the read/write speeds if run simulataneously.

The industry needs to implement better cooling for notebooks. I am going
to buy a laptop cooler to cool down my Dell even more, but nothing is
better than extra internal case fans for the laptops.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b D Laptop
December 23, 2004 1:18:37 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,comp.laptops,rec.video,rec.video.dvd.tech (More info?)

In article <LN6yd.540623$Pl.538215@pd7tw1no>, none@none.com says...
>
>
>Just wondering if this 60 G hard drive is sufficient to do basic video
>editing on a laptop and burn to dvd?
>
I suppose an ything will do for editing but not for capturing. I have
7200 and 5000 RPM drives on my system. Capturing on the 7200 produced
zero dropped frames. Capturing to the 5000 produced an unacceptable level
of dropped frames.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b D Laptop
December 23, 2004 2:01:32 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,comp.laptops,rec.video,rec.video.dvd.tech (More info?)

"Mark" <none@none.com> wrote in message
news:LN6yd.540623$Pl.538215@pd7tw1no...
> Just wondering if this 60 G hard drive is sufficient to do basic video
> editing on a laptop and burn to dvd?
>
>

I read all the thread, so I know you are mostly concerned about capturing
DV. Well... 1 hour of full-size, full-framerate DV is about 10GB, which
means about 2800 kBps ("B" here means byte).
The 10GB, 4200rpm HDD in my old 700MHz P3 laptop can read and write at about
12000 kBps (tested with Nero).
I would hence say thay you most likely won'tr run into any dropped-frame
problem.
That's theory. In practice, I made some short DV captures (due to the HDD
size, I could not capture a whole tape), and noticed some sort of loss of
"smoothness" on the DV material reversed back on tape. Anyway, I am more
keen to think that this could be caused by the DV codec, rather than by the
Hard Disk.
Anyway, just a couple of weeks ago, I have replaced that HDD with a very
silent, 80GB, 5400rpm Samsung drive with 8MB cache as opposed to the mere
128kB of the other, and let me tell you that the leap in performance was
really amazing. It is like I had replaced the processor with a 1.5GHz one.
So ultimately, If you have the chance of choosing, don't hesitate and go for
a 5400rpm drive with a lot of cache. I am 100% sure that you won't be
disappointed.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b D Laptop
December 23, 2004 2:05:53 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,comp.laptops,rec.video,rec.video.dvd.tech (More info?)

"Gogarty" <Gogarty@Clongowes.edu> wrote in message
news:EsmdnSD307FRfFfcRVn-oQ@bway.net...
> In article <LN6yd.540623$Pl.538215@pd7tw1no>, none@none.com says...
>>
>>
>>Just wondering if this 60 G hard drive is sufficient to do basic video
>>editing on a laptop and burn to dvd?
>>
> I suppose an ything will do for editing but not for capturing. I have
> 7200 and 5000 RPM drives on my system. Capturing on the 7200 produced
> zero dropped frames. Capturing to the 5000 produced an unacceptable level
> of dropped frames.


If I may butt in....... new to this whole thing! Is 'dropping frames' what
makes the transferred video seem to be jerking and/or breaking up when
viewed after uploading to the computer? My videos look fine but when I
upload them and 'burn' them to a disk they are jerky and often the sound
breaks up. Is this caused by the same problem you are discussing here, Disk
Speeds.... and is there a workaround?

Thanks

CM
December 23, 2004 2:05:54 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,comp.laptops,rec.video,rec.video.dvd.tech (More info?)

what software and how are you 'burning them to disk? If heavy
compression is used, jerky video can result. Very little to do with
drive RPM.


"C.M.German" <cmgerman@adelphia.net> wrote in message
news:C7udndFrk9lHcVfcRVn-3A@adelphia.com...
>
> "Gogarty" <Gogarty@Clongowes.edu> wrote in message
> news:EsmdnSD307FRfFfcRVn-oQ@bway.net...
> > In article <LN6yd.540623$Pl.538215@pd7tw1no>, none@none.com
says...
> >>
> >>
> >>Just wondering if this 60 G hard drive is sufficient to do basic
video
> >>editing on a laptop and burn to dvd?
> >>
> > I suppose an ything will do for editing but not for capturing. I
have
> > 7200 and 5000 RPM drives on my system. Capturing on the 7200
produced
> > zero dropped frames. Capturing to the 5000 produced an
unacceptable level
> > of dropped frames.
>
>
> If I may butt in....... new to this whole thing! Is 'dropping
frames' what
> makes the transferred video seem to be jerking and/or breaking up
when
> viewed after uploading to the computer? My videos look fine but
when I
> upload them and 'burn' them to a disk they are jerky and often the
sound
> breaks up. Is this caused by the same problem you are discussing
here, Disk
> Speeds.... and is there a workaround?
>
> Thanks
>
> CM
>
>
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b D Laptop
December 23, 2004 5:25:03 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,comp.laptops,rec.video,rec.video.dvd.tech (More info?)

Mark <nospam@nospam.com> wrote:
>
> The industry needs to implement better cooling for notebooks. I am
> going to buy a laptop cooler to cool down my Dell even more, but
> nothing is better than extra internal case fans for the laptops.

The industry _has_ implemented better cooling in laptops, they've stopped
using desktop processors (what you have) in them.

You're going to have transfer problems until you upgrade to a faster HD. The
Hitachi 60GB 7200 RPM HD is widely available for ~$150, my preferred source
is: http://www.zipzoomfly.com/jsp/ProductDetail.jsp?Product...

--
Regards,

James

Checkout the NEW Thinkpad Forums: http://forum.thinkpads.com
December 23, 2004 5:57:37 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

"Mark" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote:

>"none" <none@none.net> wrote in message
>news:3qjks0tn8l25suubkgski07akhj1746tg1@4ax.com...
>:: Yes it WILL be a problem. Use a 7200rpm drive with at least a 100mhz
>: FSB IDE controller.(I recommend using a 133mhz controller.) to capture
>: your video.
>
>The h/d that I would be using is an internal mounted inside an external
>USB 2.0 case. I don't know hot to translate the FSB speed to a USB
>equivalent. The USB 2.0 is suppose to be fast but I don't know how it
>would compare to 100 mhz, but the WD hard drive is ATA 100 only. The
>other option may be to do the video capture on a 1.8G Celeron computer
>and then remove the drive and hook it up to the USB and transfer it to
>the laptop.
>

Connect using USB2 or Firewire to the external HD and that would be fine.
The controllers are running at speeds rated in Megabytes per second not
Megahertz. Firewire or USB2 is plenty fast enough.

I would suggest setting up a laptop with a firewire PCMCIA card to connect
to the DV Camcorder and a USB2 external Hard Disc Enclosure to capture the
video to. Use the internal Hard disc on the laptop for the editing programs
not the video data.

Hope this helps

Andy
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b D Laptop
December 24, 2004 5:30:08 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,comp.laptops,rec.video,rec.video.dvd.tech (More info?)

Imagine what a 7200 rpm would do also. There are 10000 rpm advailable
but not an option for us moderate priced individuals. Soon and
probably sooner than you can imagine they will get into solid state
drives and then hold onto your seat.


On Thu, 23 Dec 2004 11:01:32 +0100, "JuniorG"
<tropicalREMOVE_ME@email.it> wrote:

>
>"Mark" <none@none.com> wrote in message
>news:LN6yd.540623$Pl.538215@pd7tw1no...
>> Just wondering if this 60 G hard drive is sufficient to do basic video
>> editing on a laptop and burn to dvd?
>>
>>
>
>I read all the thread, so I know you are mostly concerned about capturing
>DV. Well... 1 hour of full-size, full-framerate DV is about 10GB, which
>means about 2800 kBps ("B" here means byte).
>The 10GB, 4200rpm HDD in my old 700MHz P3 laptop can read and write at about
>12000 kBps (tested with Nero).
>I would hence say thay you most likely won'tr run into any dropped-frame
>problem.
>That's theory. In practice, I made some short DV captures (due to the HDD
>size, I could not capture a whole tape), and noticed some sort of loss of
>"smoothness" on the DV material reversed back on tape. Anyway, I am more
>keen to think that this could be caused by the DV codec, rather than by the
>Hard Disk.
>Anyway, just a couple of weeks ago, I have replaced that HDD with a very
>silent, 80GB, 5400rpm Samsung drive with 8MB cache as opposed to the mere
>128kB of the other, and let me tell you that the leap in performance was
>really amazing. It is like I had replaced the processor with a 1.5GHz one.
>So ultimately, If you have the chance of choosing, don't hesitate and go for
>a 5400rpm drive with a lot of cache. I am 100% sure that you won't be
>disappointed.
>
December 25, 2004 12:14:57 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,comp.laptops,rec.video,rec.video.dvd.tech (More info?)

"JHEM" <James@ESAD_SPAMMERS.thinkpads.com> wrote in message
news:3zAyd.7797$_62.4189@trnddc01...
: Mark <nospam@nospam.com> wrote:
: :
: The industry _has_ implemented better cooling in laptops, they've
stopped
: using desktop processors (what you have) in them.

Ok, I will rephrase that then. The industry needs to improve the
overall cooling by providing more airflow in the laptop.
:
: You're going to have transfer problems until you upgrade to a faster
HD. The
: Hitachi 60GB 7200 RPM HD is widely available for ~$150, my preferred
source
: is:
http://www.zipzoomfly.com/jsp/ProductDetail.jsp?Product...:

Yes, nice drive. STill can't justify the price right now. I have the
60G and I haven't used much. Will likely get a 200G drive for my
desktop and an external case. Since I am in Canada, not many retailers
carry Hitachi drives. I just bought sometghing from Tigerdirect.ca
and I still havent received the product. After this experience, I
dont like the idea of purchasing online.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b D Laptop
December 26, 2004 4:53:15 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,rec.video,rec.video.dvd.tech (More info?)

Ignore all the idiots who say capture might be a problem. DV is 3MB/s, and ANY
drive from the last 5 years does that. Just defrag your hard drive.

Burning at 4X is only slightly higher. Lack of bus-mastering or spyware is
going to be the most common problem.

"Mark" <none@none.com> wrote in message news:LN6yd.540623$Pl.538215@pd7tw1no...
> Just wondering if this 60 G hard drive is sufficient to do basic video
> editing on a laptop and burn to dvd?
>
>
December 26, 2004 10:50:06 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,comp.laptops,rec.video,rec.video.dvd.tech (More info?)

On Thu, 23 Dec 2004 05:46:57 GMT, "Mark" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote:

>"none" <none@none.net> wrote in message
>news:3qjks0tn8l25suubkgski07akhj1746tg1@4ax.com...
>:: Yes it WILL be a problem. Use a 7200rpm drive with at least a 100mhz
>: FSB IDE controller.(I recommend using a 133mhz controller.) to capture
>: your video.
>
>The h/d that I would be using is an internal mounted inside an external
>USB 2.0 case. I don't know hot to translate the FSB speed to a USB
>equivalent. The USB 2.0 is suppose to be fast but I don't know how it
>would compare to 100 mhz, but the WD hard drive is ATA 100 only. The
>other option may be to do the video capture on a 1.8G Celeron computer
>and then remove the drive and hook it up to the USB and transfer it to
>the laptop.
>
I've been told that USB 2.0 is actually faster than conventional
firewire so I'd say it all depends on your capture software.(What I
use doesn't support capture via USB.)
It couldn't hurt to give it a try.
ATA 100 is adequate for miniDV capture.(I've used ATA 100 in the past
with only a rare frame drop or two. It IS considered the bare minimum
though and is dependent on a adequate buffer rate.)
I use a Maxtor 80gig super ATA 133 drive with 8mb of buffer for my
pimary capture drive. I also have a Seagate barracuda ATA IV drive
that I use for backup once I have the video captured. I believve the
Seagate is just ATA 100. DMA5 vs. the DMA6 that the Maxtor is.)
Check and see what amount of buffer you have on that WD, I'm thinking
it should be at least 4mb, which should be enough.
I've found it also helps to have lots of ram.
My setup initially had 512mb which made for a very slow go and
resulted in occasional locks/crashes.
When I upgraded to a gig it really helped my capture process.
You can use that 1.8 celeron and do a drive swap though it'd be a big
hassle.
If you're running SB 2.0 on your main machine and your software
supports USB capture devices you should have enough.( Years ago I was
using a PII 650mhz with just 256mb of ram to do analog capture and I
got by even though it was slow going so you should have enough with
your current rig to do DV.)
My main rig is a 1.3gig Athalon with 1gig of ram running win2kpro and
it gets the job done.
December 26, 2004 10:55:43 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,comp.laptops,rec.video,rec.video.dvd.tech (More info?)

On Thu, 23 Dec 2004 11:01:32 +0100, "JuniorG"
<tropicalREMOVE_ME@email.it> wrote:

>
>"Mark" <none@none.com> wrote in message
>news:LN6yd.540623$Pl.538215@pd7tw1no...
>> Just wondering if this 60 G hard drive is sufficient to do basic video
>> editing on a laptop and burn to dvd?
>>
>>
>
>I read all the thread, so I know you are mostly concerned about capturing
>DV. Well... 1 hour of full-size, full-framerate DV is about 10GB, which
>means about 2800 kBps ("B" here means byte).
>The 10GB, 4200rpm HDD in my old 700MHz P3 laptop can read and write at about
>12000 kBps (tested with Nero).
>I would hence say thay you most likely won'tr run into any dropped-frame
>problem.
>That's theory. In practice, I made some short DV captures (due to the HDD
>size, I could not capture a whole tape), and noticed some sort of loss of
>"smoothness" on the DV material reversed back on tape. Anyway, I am more
>keen to think that this could be caused by the DV codec, rather than by the
>Hard Disk.
>Anyway, just a couple of weeks ago, I have replaced that HDD with a very
>silent, 80GB, 5400rpm Samsung drive with 8MB cache as opposed to the mere
>128kB of the other, and let me tell you that the leap in performance was
>really amazing. It is like I had replaced the processor with a 1.5GHz one.
>So ultimately, If you have the chance of choosing, don't hesitate and go for
>a 5400rpm drive with a lot of cache. I am 100% sure that you won't be
>disappointed.
>
The loss of "smoothness" in the captured video is due to frame drops.
Depending on what type of capture software you're using it should have
a frame tally to let you know how many frames were lost.(I use Studio
DV by Pinnicle which has a frame counter that lets you know how many
frames were dropped and where they were lost, allowing for second
passes on slower systems to recapture.)
December 26, 2004 11:11:58 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,comp.laptops,rec.video,rec.video.dvd.tech (More info?)

On Fri, 24 Dec 2004 02:30:08 GMT, Donald Link <linkd@mindspring.com>
wrote:

>Imagine what a 7200 rpm would do also. There are 10000 rpm advailable
>but not an option for us moderate priced individuals. Soon and
>probably sooner than you can imagine they will get into solid state
>drives and then hold onto your seat.
>
Yea, I've seen a high end field camera using a solid state storage rig
and it was sweet. So was the 30 grand price tag, so it was well out of
our range.
I've still got a number of older 3chip broadcast cameras and would
like to setup a HD recorder to use with them.(The available commercial
HD recorders are out of my price range as well.)
I've been wondering what it would take hardware wise to construct a HD
video recorder.(I have in the past used a small tower with a DV
capture card and a portable power generator for location work but that
can be a real hassle.)
>
>On Thu, 23 Dec 2004 11:01:32 +0100, "JuniorG"
><tropicalREMOVE_ME@email.it> wrote:
>
>>
>>"Mark" <none@none.com> wrote in message
>>news:LN6yd.540623$Pl.538215@pd7tw1no...
>>> Just wondering if this 60 G hard drive is sufficient to do basic video
>>> editing on a laptop and burn to dvd?
>>>
>>>
>>
>>I read all the thread, so I know you are mostly concerned about capturing
>>DV. Well... 1 hour of full-size, full-framerate DV is about 10GB, which
>>means about 2800 kBps ("B" here means byte).
>>The 10GB, 4200rpm HDD in my old 700MHz P3 laptop can read and write at about
>>12000 kBps (tested with Nero).
>>I would hence say thay you most likely won'tr run into any dropped-frame
>>problem.
>>That's theory. In practice, I made some short DV captures (due to the HDD
>>size, I could not capture a whole tape), and noticed some sort of loss of
>>"smoothness" on the DV material reversed back on tape. Anyway, I am more
>>keen to think that this could be caused by the DV codec, rather than by the
>>Hard Disk.
>>Anyway, just a couple of weeks ago, I have replaced that HDD with a very
>>silent, 80GB, 5400rpm Samsung drive with 8MB cache as opposed to the mere
>>128kB of the other, and let me tell you that the leap in performance was
>>really amazing. It is like I had replaced the processor with a 1.5GHz one.
>>So ultimately, If you have the chance of choosing, don't hesitate and go for
>>a 5400rpm drive with a lot of cache. I am 100% sure that you won't be
>>disappointed.
>>
December 26, 2004 11:25:06 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,rec.video,rec.video.dvd.tech (More info?)

On Sun, 26 Dec 2004 13:53:15 -0800, "Eric Gisin"
<ericgisin@hotmail.com> wrote:

>Ignore all the idiots who say capture might be a problem. DV is 3MB/s, and ANY
>drive from the last 5 years does that. Just defrag your hard drive.
>
>Burning at 4X is only slightly higher. Lack of bus-mastering or spyware is
>going to be the most common problem.
>
>"Mark" <none@none.com> wrote in message news:LN6yd.540623$Pl.538215@pd7tw1no...
>> Just wondering if this 60 G hard drive is sufficient to do basic video
>> editing on a laptop and burn to dvd?
>>
>>
Tell me Eric, where did you get your degree in film from?
And exactly how much experience do you have in film/video work?
Or are you even out of high school yet?
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b D Laptop
December 26, 2004 11:25:07 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,rec.video,rec.video.dvd.tech (More info?)

"none" <none@none.net> wrote in message
news:lhsus0hlii5q3aqm2kmv6s6doiv84rrs80@4ax.com...
> On Sun, 26 Dec 2004 13:53:15 -0800, "Eric Gisin"
> <ericgisin@hotmail.com> wrote:
>
> >Ignore all the idiots who say capture might be a problem. DV is 3MB/s, and
ANY
> >drive from the last 5 years does that. Just defrag your hard drive.
> >
> >Burning at 4X is only slightly higher. Lack of bus-mastering or spyware is
> >going to be the most common problem.
> >
> Tell me Eric, where did you get your degree in film from?
> And exactly how much experience do you have in film/video work?
> Or are you even out of high school yet?
>
This topic is way above the head of film people. You one of those trolls that
post anon?

Us computer people know disk performance. There is no recent disk that won't do
DV.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b D Laptop
December 27, 2004 5:58:55 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,comp.laptops,rec.video,rec.video.dvd.tech (More info?)

Will USB capture capture the audio and video like firewire?

On Sun, 26 Dec 2004 19:50:06 -0600, none <none@none.net> wrote:

>On Thu, 23 Dec 2004 05:46:57 GMT, "Mark" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote:
>
>>"none" <none@none.net> wrote in message
>>news:3qjks0tn8l25suubkgski07akhj1746tg1@4ax.com...
>>:: Yes it WILL be a problem. Use a 7200rpm drive with at least a 100mhz
>>: FSB IDE controller.(I recommend using a 133mhz controller.) to capture
>>: your video.
>>
>>The h/d that I would be using is an internal mounted inside an external
>>USB 2.0 case. I don't know hot to translate the FSB speed to a USB
>>equivalent. The USB 2.0 is suppose to be fast but I don't know how it
>>would compare to 100 mhz, but the WD hard drive is ATA 100 only. The
>>other option may be to do the video capture on a 1.8G Celeron computer
>>and then remove the drive and hook it up to the USB and transfer it to
>>the laptop.
>>
>I've been told that USB 2.0 is actually faster than conventional
>firewire so I'd say it all depends on your capture software.(What I
>use doesn't support capture via USB.)
>It couldn't hurt to give it a try.
>ATA 100 is adequate for miniDV capture.(I've used ATA 100 in the past
>with only a rare frame drop or two. It IS considered the bare minimum
>though and is dependent on a adequate buffer rate.)
>I use a Maxtor 80gig super ATA 133 drive with 8mb of buffer for my
>pimary capture drive. I also have a Seagate barracuda ATA IV drive
>that I use for backup once I have the video captured. I believve the
>Seagate is just ATA 100. DMA5 vs. the DMA6 that the Maxtor is.)
>Check and see what amount of buffer you have on that WD, I'm thinking
>it should be at least 4mb, which should be enough.
>I've found it also helps to have lots of ram.
>My setup initially had 512mb which made for a very slow go and
>resulted in occasional locks/crashes.
>When I upgraded to a gig it really helped my capture process.
>You can use that 1.8 celeron and do a drive swap though it'd be a big
>hassle.
>If you're running SB 2.0 on your main machine and your software
>supports USB capture devices you should have enough.( Years ago I was
>using a PII 650mhz with just 256mb of ram to do analog capture and I
>got by even though it was slow going so you should have enough with
>your current rig to do DV.)
>My main rig is a 1.3gig Athalon with 1gig of ram running win2kpro and
>it gets the job done.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b D Laptop
December 27, 2004 1:59:51 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,comp.laptops,rec.video,rec.video.dvd.tech (More info?)

In article <b6bks0pvn6havbcqni0djm9uvj61e8aoov@4ax.com>, Donald Link wrote:
> Editing should not be a problem but have you captured from a DV firewire
> camera?? If not try it and you problably see a problem with dropped
> frames.

Why? DV is under 4 mbyte/second, which is much slower than what any modern
drive, even a 4500 RPM drive, can handle. As long as the OS does not have a
brain dead I/O system, it shouldn't be a problem.


--
--Tim Smith
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b D Laptop
December 27, 2004 1:59:52 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,comp.laptops,rec.video,rec.video.dvd.tech (More info?)

On Mon, 27 Dec 2004 10:59:51 GMT, Tim Smith
<reply_in_group@mouse-potato.com> wrote:

>In article <b6bks0pvn6havbcqni0djm9uvj61e8aoov@4ax.com>, Donald Link wrote:
>> Editing should not be a problem but have you captured from a DV firewire
>> camera?? If not try it and you problably see a problem with dropped
>> frames.
>
>Why? DV is under 4 mbyte/second, which is much slower than what any modern
>drive, even a 4500 RPM drive, can handle. As long as the OS does not have a
>brain dead I/O system, it shouldn't be a problem.
i capture from my mini-dv via firewire on my amd 266 win98se computer.
never drops a frame. i used dvio. i think this is far more software
dependent. using a bloat like premierre may cause lost frames.
....thehick
December 28, 2004 1:01:30 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,comp.laptops,rec.video,rec.video.dvd.tech (More info?)

On Mon, 27 Dec 2004 10:59:51 GMT, Tim Smith
<reply_in_group@mouse-potato.com> wrote:

>In article <b6bks0pvn6havbcqni0djm9uvj61e8aoov@4ax.com>, Donald Link wrote:
>> Editing should not be a problem but have you captured from a DV firewire
>> camera?? If not try it and you problably see a problem with dropped
>> frames.
>
>Why? DV is under 4 mbyte/second, which is much slower than what any modern
>drive, even a 4500 RPM drive, can handle. As long as the OS does not have a
>brain dead I/O system, it shouldn't be a problem.

Incorrect, DV runs around 4.5 to 5 mb per second at least every
capture I've ever done runs at this rate.(And that's mini DV, full
sized Dv runs much more.)
December 28, 2004 1:10:37 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,rec.video,rec.video.dvd.tech (More info?)

On Sun, 26 Dec 2004 19:31:14 -0800, "Eric Gisin"
<ericgisin@hotmail.com> wrote:

>"none" <none@none.net> wrote in message
>news:lhsus0hlii5q3aqm2kmv6s6doiv84rrs80@4ax.com...
>> On Sun, 26 Dec 2004 13:53:15 -0800, "Eric Gisin"
>> <ericgisin@hotmail.com> wrote:
>>
>> >Ignore all the idiots who say capture might be a problem. DV is 3MB/s, and
>ANY
>> >drive from the last 5 years does that. Just defrag your hard drive.
>> >
>> >Burning at 4X is only slightly higher. Lack of bus-mastering or spyware is
>> >going to be the most common problem.
>> >
>> Tell me Eric, where did you get your degree in film from?
>> And exactly how much experience do you have in film/video work?
>> Or are you even out of high school yet?
>>
>This topic is way above the head of film people. You one of those trolls that
>post anon?
>
>Us computer people know disk performance. There is no recent disk that won't do
>DV.

Calling me a troll? After you went and called every one here idiots?

I've found that many "computer people" don't know much past their
one's and zero's, especially those still coping with acne.

If you REALLY had any experience capturing dv via firewire you'd know
for a fact that the data rate is well above your quoted 3mb.(I run 4.5
to 5 mbps on ALL of my captures.)
The fact is anyone who'd say a a 4200 drive would work needs to get
his conceited head out of his ass and read up on the subject before
opening his mouth and removing all doubt.
December 28, 2004 1:11:47 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,rec.video,rec.video.dvd.tech (More info?)

OP

Just wondering if this 60 G hard drive is sufficient to do basic video
editing on a laptop and burn to dvd?


<The fact is anyone who'd say a a 4200 drive would work needs to get>


um where do you see DV via Firewire?

"none" <none@none.net> wrote in message
news:tlm1t09cpkkkkatr8vh6lofho3l7gsbi33@4ax.com...
> On Sun, 26 Dec 2004 19:31:14 -0800, "Eric Gisin"
> <ericgisin@hotmail.com> wrote:
>
> >"none" <none@none.net> wrote in message
> >news:lhsus0hlii5q3aqm2kmv6s6doiv84rrs80@4ax.com...
> >> On Sun, 26 Dec 2004 13:53:15 -0800, "Eric Gisin"
> >> <ericgisin@hotmail.com> wrote:
> >>
> >> >Ignore all the idiots who say capture might be a problem. DV is
3MB/s, and
> >ANY
> >> >drive from the last 5 years does that. Just defrag your hard
drive.
> >> >
> >> >Burning at 4X is only slightly higher. Lack of bus-mastering or
spyware is
> >> >going to be the most common problem.
> >> >
> >> Tell me Eric, where did you get your degree in film from?
> >> And exactly how much experience do you have in film/video work?
> >> Or are you even out of high school yet?
> >>
> >This topic is way above the head of film people. You one of those
trolls that
> >post anon?
> >
> >Us computer people know disk performance. There is no recent disk
that won't do
> >DV.
>
> Calling me a troll? After you went and called every one here idiots?
>
> I've found that many "computer people" don't know much past their
> one's and zero's, especially those still coping with acne.
>
> If you REALLY had any experience capturing dv via firewire you'd
know
> for a fact that the data rate is well above your quoted 3mb.(I run
4.5
> to 5 mbps on ALL of my captures.)
> The fact is anyone who'd say a a 4200 drive would work needs to get
> his conceited head out of his ass and read up on the subject before
> opening his mouth and removing all doubt.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b D Laptop
December 28, 2004 6:02:44 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,comp.laptops,rec.video,rec.video.dvd.tech (More info?)

Well in real life the 4200 drive is not fast enough and you will drop
frames from a Mini DV carmera capture. Have you tried it? I have and
using a Pinnacle it will not even pass the drive to capture from 2
Sony and 1 Canon DV camcorders and even a 5400 rpm is marginal and if
you do try to capure there is a lot of dropped frames and the 4200 is
a mess. Assuming xp pro is a brain dead OS then you have to get a
reality check. I assume you are a MAC user.

On Mon, 27 Dec 2004 10:59:51 GMT, Tim Smith
<reply_in_group@mouse-potato.com> wrote:

>In article <b6bks0pvn6havbcqni0djm9uvj61e8aoov@4ax.com>, Donald Link wrote:
>> Editing should not be a problem but have you captured from a DV firewire
>> camera?? If not try it and you problably see a problem with dropped
>> frames.
>
>Why? DV is under 4 mbyte/second, which is much slower than what any modern
>drive, even a 4500 RPM drive, can handle. As long as the OS does not have a
>brain dead I/O system, it shouldn't be a problem.
December 29, 2004 12:12:22 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,rec.video,rec.video.dvd.tech (More info?)

What's the recommended software for capture? Nothing fancy is required.
Thanks

"Eric Gisin" <ericgisin@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:cqncog32mj@enews2.newsguy.com...
: Ignore all the idiots who say capture might be a problem. DV is 3MB/s,
and ANY
: drive from the last 5 years does that. Just defrag your hard drive.
:
: Burning at 4X is only slightly higher. Lack of bus-mastering or
spyware is
: going to be the most common problem.
:
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b D Laptop
December 29, 2004 12:12:23 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,rec.video,rec.video.dvd.tech (More info?)

On Tue, 28 Dec 2004 21:12:22 GMT, "Mark" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote:

>What's the recommended software for capture? Nothing fancy is required.
>Thanks
>
>"Eric Gisin" <ericgisin@hotmail.com> wrote in message
>news:cqncog32mj@enews2.newsguy.com...
>: Ignore all the idiots who say capture might be a problem. DV is 3MB/s,
>and ANY
>: drive from the last 5 years does that. Just defrag your hard drive.
>:
>: Burning at 4X is only slightly higher. Lack of bus-mastering or
>spyware is
>: going to be the most common problem.
i have used dvio on a very slow amd266. worked well.
....thehick
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b D Laptop
December 29, 2004 12:22:15 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,comp.laptops,rec.video,rec.video.dvd.tech (More info?)

Mark wrote:
> Just wondering if this 60 G hard drive is sufficient to do basic video
> editing on a laptop and burn to dvd?

FWIW I have successfully captured many hours of DV footage to my PIII 900
Dell Inspiron laptop with a 30GB 5,400 rpm 2MB cache drive for editing. To
guarantee no dropped frames I did need to defrag (better to keep video
partition separate from system partition) and stop as many unecessary
processes as possible. Doing anything else (like browsing, email or word
processing) while capturing was/is an absolute no-no. At 12GB per hour (PAL
DV) I had to limit my edits to one tape at a time before outputting back to
DV or s-VHS for archival.

Windows Movie Maker is fine to start practicing capture and simple edits and
as it's free with Windows XP you may as well give that a shot first :-)

Cheers,
Tim.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b D Laptop
December 30, 2004 9:34:50 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,rec.video,rec.video.dvd.tech (More info?)

"none" <none@none.net> wrote


> If you REALLY had any experience capturing dv via firewire you'd know
> for a fact that the data rate is well above your quoted 3mb.(I run 4.5
> to 5 mbps on ALL of my captures.)

Ignoring the wrong use of units, (mbps= milli bits per second !!) I assume
you mean 4.5 to 5 MB/sec (MegaBytes per second).

Here in PAL DV land at least, DV firewire transfer speed is *not* variable.
It is fixed at 3.6MB/sec.

> The fact is anyone who'd say a a 4200 drive would work needs to get
> his conceited head out of his ass and read up on the subject before
> opening his mouth and removing all doubt.

I think you're directly equating hard drive rotational speed with data
transfer rate: admittedly the two are related but the main factor, and the
one you are ignoring, is the data packing on the hard disk platters. Modern
drives have data packed tightly on the platter tracks, so even at 4200 rpm
speeds, data can be read and written at a rate way over that needed by DV
firewire capture.

HTH

Neil
December 31, 2004 4:45:52 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,rec.video,rec.video.dvd.tech (More info?)

On Thu, 30 Dec 2004 18:34:50 -0000, "Gripper" <dontspamme@home.dot>
wrote:

>
>"none" <none@none.net> wrote
>
>
>> If you REALLY had any experience capturing dv via firewire you'd know
>> for a fact that the data rate is well above your quoted 3mb.(I run 4.5
>> to 5 mbps on ALL of my captures.)
>
>Ignoring the wrong use of units, (mbps= milli bits per second !!) I assume
>you mean 4.5 to 5 MB/sec (MegaBytes per second).
>
>Here in PAL DV land at least, DV firewire transfer speed is *not* variable.
>It is fixed at 3.6MB/sec.
>
>> The fact is anyone who'd say a a 4200 drive would work needs to get
>> his conceited head out of his ass and read up on the subject before
>> opening his mouth and removing all doubt.
>
>I think you're directly equating hard drive rotational speed with data
>transfer rate: admittedly the two are related but the main factor, and the
>one you are ignoring, is the data packing on the hard disk platters. Modern
>drives have data packed tightly on the platter tracks, so even at 4200 rpm
>speeds, data can be read and written at a rate way over that needed by DV
>firewire capture.
>
>HTH
>
>Neil
>
>
You have actually no clue what you are talking about.
IF you did have any experience you wouldn't make such lame ass claims
about a 4200 drive being able to keep up with DV capture.
And for another thing virtually ALL DV capture is done via
Firewire.(Or if you have the newer systems with usb 2.0 and supporting
software that option.)
I have several DV capture software packages and ALL first run a system
check to assertain HD speed.
If you try it with a 4200 HD you won't even get the software to
intiate a capture.
I worked in film and video production for longer than you've been
around whereas you sound if you've done nothing but theoretical work,
and not too long at that.

But, HEY, don't believe me. Go out and invest a bit in a DV capture
card and give it a try with your 4200 drive.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b D Laptop
December 31, 2004 4:45:53 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,rec.video,rec.video.dvd.tech (More info?)

none <Vampyres@nettaxi.com> writes:
> You have actually no clue what you are talking about.
> IF you did have any experience you wouldn't make such lame ass claims
> about a 4200 drive being able to keep up with DV capture.

You are the one with no clue. The transfer speed of a drive doesn't
depend solely on the rotation speed. The bit density also matters. A
4200 rpm, 80 gb drive will transfer faster than a 7200 rpm, 40 gb
drive with the same number of tracks.
December 31, 2004 11:12:13 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,rec.video,rec.video.dvd.tech (More info?)

"none" < is a liar. if you were in DV for any amount of years you wouldn't
be talking this utter bullshit...DVR has been around long before 4200+ rpm
drives. what happened then? people just played at it? never accomplished
anything just, pretended to record.

once again where is this DVR direct through firewire even mentioned in the
OP?

THIS IS THE OP:

Just wondering if this 60 G hard drive is sufficient to do basic video
editing on a laptop and burn to dvd?

you videophiles invented the whole subject line?
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b D Laptop
December 31, 2004 11:27:57 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,rec.video,rec.video.dvd.tech (More info?)

On Fri, 31 Dec 2004 01:45:52 -0600, none <Vampyres@nettaxi.com> wrote:

>On Thu, 30 Dec 2004 18:34:50 -0000, "Gripper" <dontspamme@home.dot>
>wrote:
>
>>
>>"none" <none@none.net> wrote
>>
>>
>>> If you REALLY had any experience capturing dv via firewire you'd know
>>> for a fact that the data rate is well above your quoted 3mb.(I run 4.5
>>> to 5 mbps on ALL of my captures.)
>>
>>Ignoring the wrong use of units, (mbps= milli bits per second !!) I assume
>>you mean 4.5 to 5 MB/sec (MegaBytes per second).
>>
>>Here in PAL DV land at least, DV firewire transfer speed is *not* variable.
>>It is fixed at 3.6MB/sec.
>>
>>> The fact is anyone who'd say a a 4200 drive would work needs to get
>>> his conceited head out of his ass and read up on the subject before
>>> opening his mouth and removing all doubt.
>>
>>I think you're directly equating hard drive rotational speed with data
>>transfer rate: admittedly the two are related but the main factor, and the
>>one you are ignoring, is the data packing on the hard disk platters. Modern
>>drives have data packed tightly on the platter tracks, so even at 4200 rpm
>>speeds, data can be read and written at a rate way over that needed by DV
>>firewire capture.
>>
>>HTH
>>
>>Neil
>>
>>
>You have actually no clue what you are talking about.
>IF you did have any experience you wouldn't make such lame ass claims
>about a 4200 drive being able to keep up with DV capture.
>And for another thing virtually ALL DV capture is done via
>Firewire.(Or if you have the newer systems with usb 2.0 and supporting
>software that option.)
>I have several DV capture software packages and ALL first run a system
>check to assertain HD speed.
>If you try it with a 4200 HD you won't even get the software to
>intiate a capture.
>I worked in film and video production for longer than you've been
>around whereas you sound if you've done nothing but theoretical work,
>and not too long at that.
>
>But, HEY, don't believe me. Go out and invest a bit in a DV capture
>card and give it a try with your 4200 drive.
>

Well said. I was getting tired of this issue of a 4200 being able to
capture video when any idiot would know that in the real world even a
7200 can have problems if you can not get the DMA to work on the hard
drive and have to capture with PIO. However, with cheap price of
drives why anyone would even talk about slower drives is beyond me.
Like the people who have a computer that runs win95 and has a 133
processor wanting to know why movies do not play or why software
developers do not support DOS anymore. Prices are so dirt cheap on
hardware to try to install and run software that cost twice the
hardware price.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b D Laptop
December 31, 2004 11:27:58 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,rec.video,rec.video.dvd.tech (More info?)

Donald Link <linkd@mindspring.com> writes:
> capture video when any idiot would know that in the real world even a
> 7200 can have problems if you can not get the DMA to work on the hard
> drive and have to capture with PIO. However, with cheap price of
> drives why anyone would even talk about slower drives is beyond me.

I'm using a laptop and the highest capacity laptop drives are all 4200
rpm.
December 31, 2004 11:35:46 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,rec.video,rec.video.dvd.tech (More info?)

"Donald Link" absolutley clueless


your ignorance is only exceeded by your desire to express it.

DMA not working? why would that be a 'drive' problem? That is an improperly
install OS or the IDE drivers. Tell me WHERE is this direct recording from
DV recorder even mentioned by the OP?

when there were no 4200+ drives, what the hell did people record with?
O IC DVR is brand-new never been done before.
>
>
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
a b D Laptop
December 31, 2004 12:00:54 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,rec.video,rec.video.dvd.tech (More info?)

"none" <Vampyres@nettaxi.com> wrote

> You have actually no clue what you are talking about.
> IF you did have any experience you wouldn't make such lame ass claims
> about a 4200 drive being able to keep up with DV capture.

Thanks for another polite reply. You've conveneintly ignored the part of my
post about fixed firewire DV transfer rate.
However, take a look here:

http://www.hitachigst.com/hdd/support/4k40/4k40.htm

this is the first page I looked at after googling for 4200 rpm hard disks.
You'll notice on the specs that the transfer rate is quoted as 370Mb/sec.
That equals 46.25MB/sec. Even allowing for your strange DV transfer rates of
"4.5 to 5 mbps (!)", that is a factor of 10 times the needed transfer rate.

> I worked in film and video production for longer than you've been
> around

so you can work a clapper board....

> whereas you sound if you've done nothing but theoretical work,
> and not too long at that.

wrong

> But, HEY, don't believe me. Go out and invest a bit in a DV capture
> card and give it a try with your 4200 drive.

yup been there done that etc

Neil
!