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My computer reboots itself for unknown reasons? Help pleas..

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Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
December 24, 2004 8:54:16 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

Award bootblock BIOS v1.0

copyright (C)2000, Award Software, Inc.

BIOS ROM Checksum error

Detecting floppy drive A media...
---------------------------------------------
While using winxp the computer dumps out of XP and goes to a black
screen [like the old dos days] and displays the "above message
appears" and the A:D rive light is green and on like it is expecting a
disk in the drive.


PROBLEM: My computer reboots itself for unknown reasons.

here is a list of my comp
WinXP
ASUS A7N8X-UAY 400Mhz FSB
CPU AMD|2500+/333 Athlon XP Barton
Connect 3d|Radeon 9600 128M DVI/TV video card
DDRAM 256MG|DDR400 CL25 PC3200 Kingston X2 = 512 Megs o ram
HD 80GB|WD 7200RPM 8mb cache


Also, my clock runs about 4 minutes fast all the time, I have to re
sychronize it all the time with windows servers.
any help would be appreciated with this problem.


I am sorry for crossposting but I wanted to reach a wider group of
people with knowledge.
thank you,
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
December 24, 2004 10:15:20 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

First, clock speed when computer is on is a function of a
computer timing crystal. A completely different clock
associated with CMOS determines time when powered off. You
did not provide sufficient information to answer this clock
error problem.

First provide basic information. A previously posted
procedure will provide basic facts that are still missing:
alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt on 20 Dec 2004 entitled
"Computer freezes" at
http://tinyurl.com/4tkqz
With numbers, then we go from wild speculating to making
informed decisions as to what to do next.

"dnc_tn@yahoo.com" wrote:
> Award bootblock BIOS v1.0
>
> copyright (C)2000, Award Software, Inc.
>
> BIOS ROM Checksum error
>
> Detecting floppy drive A media...
> ---------------------------------------------
> While using winxp the computer dumps out of XP and goes to a black
> screen [like the old dos days] and displays the "above message
> appears" and the A:D rive light is green and on like it is expecting a
> disk in the drive.
>
> PROBLEM: My computer reboots itself for unknown reasons.
>
> here is a list of my comp
> WinXP
> ASUS A7N8X-UAY 400Mhz FSB
> CPU AMD|2500+/333 Athlon XP Barton
> Connect 3d|Radeon 9600 128M DVI/TV video card
> DDRAM 256MG|DDR400 CL25 PC3200 Kingston X2 = 512 Megs o ram
> HD 80GB|WD 7200RPM 8mb cache
>
> Also, my clock runs about 4 minutes fast all the time, I have to re
> sychronize it all the time with windows servers.
> any help would be appreciated with this problem.
>
> I am sorry for crossposting but I wanted to reach a wider group of
> people with knowledge.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
December 24, 2004 9:45:08 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

"dnc_tn@yahoo.com" <DNC_TN@> wrote in message
news:f8tns0phev3u0psm9pqr9tuku8r4o6avkb@4ax.com...
> Award bootblock BIOS v1.0
>
> copyright (C)2000, Award Software, Inc.
>
> BIOS ROM Checksum error
>
> Detecting floppy drive A media...
> ---------------------------------------------
> While using winxp the computer dumps out of XP and goes to a black
> screen [like the old dos days] and displays the "above message
> appears" and the A:D rive light is green and on like it is expecting a
> disk in the drive.
>
>
> PROBLEM: My computer reboots itself for unknown reasons.
>
> here is a list of my comp
> WinXP
> ASUS A7N8X-UAY 400Mhz FSB
> CPU AMD|2500+/333 Athlon XP Barton
> Connect 3d|Radeon 9600 128M DVI/TV video card
> DDRAM 256MG|DDR400 CL25 PC3200 Kingston X2 = 512 Megs o ram
> HD 80GB|WD 7200RPM 8mb cache
>
>
> Also, my clock runs about 4 minutes fast all the time, I have to re
> sychronize it all the time with windows servers.
> any help would be appreciated with this problem.
>
>
> I am sorry for crossposting but I wanted to reach a wider group of
> people with knowledge.
> thank you,
>
With system powered off, use jumper on motherboard to reset CMOS. (see
motherboard manual) If clock just runs 4min fast it is either being synced
to an inaccurate clock,(are you on a network? may be synced to server) or
you are checking against an inaccurate clock, or do you mean it gains 4min a
day?
Mike.
Related resources
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
December 25, 2004 4:04:27 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

dnc_tn@yahoo.com:

> BIOS ROM Checksum error

Based on the info given, here's what I would try, in order:
1. reset the cmos
2. replace the battery and clean the battery terminals if needed
3. Test the memory, if you don't have a known good stick, try pulling
first one stick and then the other. If the problem disappears then replace
the faulty stick. You can also try memtest86.
4. flash the bios - don't flash the bios until after you have tested the
memory and are certain the memory isn't the problem

--
Mac Cool
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
December 25, 2004 8:07:31 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

On Sat, 25 Dec 2004 01:04:27 GMT, Mac Cool <Mac@2cool.com> wrote:

>dnc_tn@yahoo.com:
>
>> BIOS ROM Checksum error
>
>Based on the info given, here's what I would try, in order:
>1. reset the cmos
>2. replace the battery and clean the battery terminals if needed
>3. Test the memory, if you don't have a known good stick, try pulling
>first one stick and then the other. If the problem disappears then replace
>the faulty stick. You can also try memtest86.
>4. flash the bios - don't flash the bios until after you have tested the
>memory and are certain the memory isn't the problem

Is there is "step by step" instruction on how to replace a cmos
battery anywhere on the net? I've never done it before and the thought
make me nausious. I've already ran memtest86 and it checks ok btw.

If I reset the cmos do I have to remember all the bios settings or are
the settings retained??

I'm very confused.

thanks for your help.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
December 26, 2004 6:28:16 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

dnc_tn@yahoo.com:
> Is there is "step by step" instruction on how to replace a cmos
> battery anywhere on the net? I've never done it before and the
> thought make me nausious.

Most motherboards are very simple. There is a flat, round battery about
the size of a dime that sits under a clip. Gently lift the clip and
slide the battery out. Take it to the store and match it up. Your
motherboard is fairly new isn't it? The battery probably isn't your
problem but it wouldn't hurt to check.

> I've already ran memtest86 and it checks ok

If you are certain the memory is good then go ahead and flash the bios
before replacing the battery, it won't hurt anything.

> If I reset the cmos do I have to remember all the bios settings or
> are the settings retained??

The settings will be lost, that's the idea. It's possible, although not
likely unless you've been in there mucking around, that a bios setting
is causing your problem. It's also possible that your bios is somehow
corrupted and flashing the bios may solve the problem.

> I'm very confused.

Try some Google searching on flashing the bios and changing bios
settings. There used to be some excellent websites with step by step
walkthroughs. Some motherboard manuals are very good also.
--
Mac Cool
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
December 26, 2004 1:55:20 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

If clock is speeding up when computer is off, then coin cell
might be reason for 'fast' clock. But two different clocks
exist. Which clock is running fast?

In the meantime, a procedure was posted previously that
includes the important multimeter. Is coin cell defective?
Meter would report a defect in 15 sec - without even removing
anything. If coin cell voltage is low, then that might
address the fast clock and CMOS (not BIOS) failure. Lost CMOS
data can result in a BIOS checksum error.

Do not flash the bios. Worst time to flash a bios is when
hardware - and especially power supply - integrity is
unknown. Marginal power supply during flash could destroy the
motherboard. BIOS is not reason for the problem. No
technical reason to suspect RAM either. CMOS may be
problematic due to low battery voltage. Same multimeter that
would confirm power supply voltages would also identify that
coin cell voltage in 15 seconds.

CMOS checksum error is reset after new battery installed.

Mac Cool wrote:
> dnc_tn@yahoo.com:
>> Is there is "step by step" instruction on how to replace a cmos
>> battery anywhere on the net? I've never done it before and the
>> thought make me nausious.
>
> Most motherboards are very simple. There is a flat, round battery about
> the size of a dime that sits under a clip. Gently lift the clip and
> slide the battery out. Take it to the store and match it up. Your
> motherboard is fairly new isn't it? The battery probably isn't your
> problem but it wouldn't hurt to check.
>
>> I've already ran memtest86 and it checks ok
>
> If you are certain the memory is good then go ahead and flash the bios
> before replacing the battery, it won't hurt anything.
>
>> If I reset the cmos do I have to remember all the bios settings or
>> are the settings retained??
>
> The settings will be lost, that's the idea. It's possible, although not
> likely unless you've been in there mucking around, that a bios setting
> is causing your problem. It's also possible that your bios is somehow
> corrupted and flashing the bios may solve the problem.
>
>> I'm very confused.
>
> Try some Google searching on flashing the bios and changing bios
> settings. There used to be some excellent websites with step by step
> walkthroughs. Some motherboard manuals are very good also.
> --
> Mac Cool
!