300w or 500w power supply

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

When I was looking for cases the other day, they had 2 diferent types, one
with 300w power supply and one with 500w power supply. What are the
benefits (or disadvantages) over one or the other?
19 answers Last reply
More about 300w 500w power supply
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Beck wrote:
    > When I was looking for cases the other day, they
    > had 2 diferent types, one with 300w power supply
    > and one with 500w power supply. What are the
    > benefits (or disadvantages) over one or the other?

    If they're of equal quality, there are no disadvantages to the 500W
    because with the same computer load it will consume about the same
    amount of power as the 300W.

    OTOH high-quality PSUs rated 350W or less can be very cheap, like
    $20-35, but a good 500W normally costs at least $60-80. Some 500W PSUs
    are so bad that they can't even put out as much power as a good 300W.

    Newegg.com and Directron.com have Fortron-made PSUs that are both very
    good and cheap, and they sell under several brands, including Sparkle,
    Powerman, Hi-Q, and PowerQ.
  2. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Watch out for cheap power supplies... I purchased a 500w in a cheap case and
    the unit smoked within three weeks. I would buy a good 350w over a cheap
    500w. A 300w will work fine, unless you are planning on installing four hard
    drives, two burners and a microwave oven.:)
    ..
  3. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "Beck" <my_bulkmail@REMOVEbtopenworld.com> wrote...
    > When I was looking for cases the other day, they had 2 diferent types, one
    > with 300w power supply and one with 500w power supply. What are the benefits
    > (or disadvantages) over one or the other?

    If all else is equal between them (same quality...), you should size your PS so
    your normal requirements are about 40-60% of the PS stated capacity. Efficiency
    standards are based on the midrange of the output.

    These days a "normal" single-CPU computer with 1 or 2 HDs and 1 or 2 CD/DVD
    drives will work fine on a 300w PS. However, if you have a BIG graphics card
    and a BIG sound card and a high-power CPU, you may want to go to 500w.
  4. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "Beck" <my_bulkmail@REMOVEbtopenworld.com> wrote in message
    news:cslbqr$dm3$1@sparta.btinternet.com...
    > When I was looking for cases the other day, they had 2 diferent types, one
    > with 300w power supply and one with 500w power supply. What are the
    > benefits (or disadvantages) over one or the other?

    More juice, you can add more gear at a later stage...get the 500W.
  5. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Beck wrote:

    >Do all motherboards take higher watts?

    All motherboards can accept a PSU rated at any wattage no matter
    how high.

    A PSU does not generate its rated wattage, but actually generates
    however many watts the equipment consumes. The rating simply
    tells what its upper limit is.

    It's not like a water pump which pushes a particular amount of
    water and whatever is downstream had better deal with it or else!

    It's like a tank of water feeding pipes with a lot of spigots,
    where a pump keeps the water tank topped off. The amount of water
    it outputs simply depends upon how much water is needed. If no
    one turns on their spigots, then no water is supplied. There is
    naturally an upper limit on how much total water can be supplied,
    determined by how fast the pump can keep the tank topped off
    when going full blast.

    Isaac Kuo
  6. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Beck wrote:
    > When I was looking for cases the other day, they had 2 diferent types, one
    > with 300w power supply and one with 500w power supply. What are the
    > benefits (or disadvantages) over one or the other?
    >
    >
    Generally more is better but it depends on the quality of the PSU.
    Certain 500W PSUs that claim to deliver 500W deliver far less. Get a PSU
    from a reputable manufacturer like Enermax or Antec if you are serious
    about the rest of the gear in your machine.

    Ron
  7. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "Freedom55" <"joinertake this out"@ns.sympatico.ca> wrote in message
    news:VjrHd.214252$Np3.8999749@ursa-nb00s0.nbnet.nb.ca...
    > Beck wrote:
    >> When I was looking for cases the other day, they had 2 diferent types,
    >> one with 300w power supply and one with 500w power supply. What are the
    >> benefits (or disadvantages) over one or the other?
    > Generally more is better but it depends on the quality of the PSU. Certain
    > 500W PSUs that claim to deliver 500W deliver far less. Get a PSU from a
    > reputable manufacturer like Enermax or Antec if you are serious about the
    > rest of the gear in your machine.

    I am not overly bothered about the machine to be honest. I am just curious
    about why someone would need more.
  8. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "Richard Dower" <richarddower@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:csldrj$edp$1@kermit.esat.net...
    >
    > "Beck" <my_bulkmail@REMOVEbtopenworld.com> wrote in message
    > news:cslbqr$dm3$1@sparta.btinternet.com...
    >> When I was looking for cases the other day, they had 2 diferent types,
    >> one with 300w power supply and one with 500w power supply. What are the
    >> benefits (or disadvantages) over one or the other?
    >
    > More juice, you can add more gear at a later stage...get the 500W.

    Do all motherboards take higher watts?
  9. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    You need to estimate what the wattage requirements of the components you
    plan on installing in the case are. That will determine your power needs.
    In this day and age, though, the 500 W unit is far more practical.

    --
    DaveW


    "Beck" <my_bulkmail@REMOVEbtopenworld.com> wrote in message
    news:cslbqr$dm3$1@sparta.btinternet.com...
    > When I was looking for cases the other day, they had 2 diferent types, one
    > with 300w power supply and one with 500w power supply. What are the
    > benefits (or disadvantages) over one or the other?
    >
  10. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "IsaacKuo" <mechdan@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:1106148566.137622.55440@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
    >
    > Beck wrote:
    >
    >>Do all motherboards take higher watts?
    >
    > All motherboards can accept a PSU rated at any wattage no matter
    > how high.
    >
    > A PSU does not generate its rated wattage, but actually generates
    > however many watts the equipment consumes. The rating simply
    > tells what its upper limit is.
    >
    > It's not like a water pump which pushes a particular amount of
    > water and whatever is downstream had better deal with it or else!
    >
    > It's like a tank of water feeding pipes with a lot of spigots,
    > where a pump keeps the water tank topped off. The amount of water
    > it outputs simply depends upon how much water is needed. If no
    > one turns on their spigots, then no water is supplied. There is
    > naturally an upper limit on how much total water can be supplied,
    > determined by how fast the pump can keep the tank topped off
    > when going full blast.

    Right I see. So say for example a pc had 2 hard drives and 2 optical drives
    (cdrw and dvd), would a 230wpower supply be dangerous to use? I am thinking
    it should be safe as not all of those items are being used at the same time.
    Sorry if they seem silly questions, but I am not up on 'current' electrical
    knowhow.
  11. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    The system will have different wattage requirements for each
    voltage. To perform an analysis, you must calculate the
    wattage consumed by each component for each voltage, add the
    wattages for each voltage, then verify the power supply can
    provide that wattage for that voltage.

    This is where 230 watt power supplies have a problem. When
    they were built, the load on 12 volts was not so high. Newer
    systems require more wattage on the 12 volts. 230 watts
    overall is typically sufficient. But the 12 volt wattage may
    be too low.

    It those calculators don't do wattage for each voltage, then
    the calculators are really deficient.

    Most every system works just fine with a 350 watt supply.
    That is typically more than enough power. Since they are
    selling power supplies to computer assemblers, then the
    'trick' is to lower cost. Computer assemblers rarely
    understand functions are suppose to be in a power supply AND
    therefore only buy on one number - price.

    You want to be smarter. You power supply must include those
    many functions. If the power supply is selling for $25 or $40
    retail, then you can suspect they have forgotten many
    essential functions. A minimally sufficient power supply is
    about $60 retail AND includes a long list of numeric specs.
    You don't understand those numbers? Does not matter. Only 1%
    of the consumers do. But that one 1% is only empowered to
    report defective supplies WHEN those numbers are provided in
    writing.

    Bottom line - your power supply should retail at about $60
    AND it must provide a long list of numerical specifications.
    Two simple benchmarks for a minimally acceptable supply.

    Is a supply too small dangerous? Only where myths are
    rampant. If the power supply is too small, then the system
    shuts down. No hardware damage results (assuming the power
    supply contains those essential functions).

    Don't fall for those who constantly preach the Tim Allen
    concept of "more power". Home Improvement was mocking those
    who promote more watts. And yet still, so many computer
    assemblers insist we need 400 and 500 watt power supplies -
    because they never even learned what basic functions are
    suppose to be included in a power supply. They never even
    learned basic electrical concepts. You want a long list of
    numeric specs. Otherwise suspect the worst.

    Beck wrote:
    > Right I see. So say for example a pc had 2 hard drives and 2
    > optical drives (cdrw and dvd), would a 230wpower supply be
    > dangerous to use? I am thinking it should be safe as not all of
    > those items are being used at the same time. Sorry if they seem
    > silly questions, but I am not up on 'current' electrical knowhow.
  12. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    newegg.com? your kidding... RMA capital of the net IMO.

    Since they charge a 15% restocking fee they make money selling garbage.
    Their TOS clearly state that even defective items for refunds result in
    a 15% fee. Furthermore it also clearly states that the 30 day warranty
    period is not changed when an item is returned, it continues at the
    original ship date. So if you get one of the "bad" (free profit for
    newegg.com) version, you have to pay to ship it back, wait who knows
    how long, but certainly at least a month? then risk getting another bad
    one and I guess eat the cost because the thirty day warranty is expired
    or you can just take the better deal of minus 15% plus the shipping fee
    each way. Terms like that scream drive to and walk into a store
    somewhere and pay $7.50 more for real customer service. If you want to
    gamble go to a casino where you get much better odds like a blackjack
    or a slot machine. Please don't mention newegg.com. I got garbage
    and only got $9.73 back out of $60, which somehow made since some how?
    Hey if nothing else do a test and try and send an e-mail or call
    customer service before you risk putting down your cash for NOTHING.
    That way you'll know what your in for if you have to deal with them.

    An interesting study would be to get the data which manufacutures keep
    in regard to "special testing" that they are forced to do for big "low
    ball" sellers like newegg.com. Isuspect that quite often the only
    measure they can take is to eliminate or greatly reduce the amount of
    quality control testing they do prior to sending out merchandise. If
    you accept this as reasonable, newegg.com marketing and purchasing is
    pure genious. Force the manufacturer to cut corners, yet retain the
    ability to profit when the product is defective. GENIOUS!

    Stand up for your rights. Don't shop "no service-low ball- resellers"
    that profit no matter what, even when the item is defective. Customer
    service has a value, and should be paid for. The couple bucks you save
    is not worth the risk.

    Try not doing your job- and making money still? Newegg.com? HA HA HA he
    hahhhhh
  13. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Exactly!...power wattage is going UP not down. OCZ have a 700W PSU in the
    works with dul PCI-E power adapters for SLI. Thermaltake already have a
    three rail 12V PSU and another company is planning a four rail 12V PSU.

    Folks gotta move with the times.


    "DaveW" <none@zero.org> wrote in message
    news:BIydnYYmK-2gZ3PcRVn-uA@comcast.com...
    > You need to estimate what the wattage requirements of the components you
    > plan on installing in the case are. That will determine your power needs.
    > In this day and age, though, the 500 W unit is far more practical.
    >
    > --
    > DaveW
    >
    >
    >
    > "Beck" <my_bulkmail@REMOVEbtopenworld.com> wrote in message
    > news:cslbqr$dm3$1@sparta.btinternet.com...
    >> When I was looking for cases the other day, they had 2 diferent types,
    >> one with 300w power supply and one with 500w power supply. What are the
    >> benefits (or disadvantages) over one or the other?
    >>
    >
    >
  14. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "Random Code Generator" <brian@calvoc.org> wrote in message
    news:1106192957.077234.139860@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
    > newegg.com? your kidding... RMA capital of the net IMO.
    >
    > Since they charge a 15% restocking fee they make money selling garbage.
    > Their TOS clearly state that even defective items for refunds result in
    > a 15% fee. Furthermore it also clearly states that the 30 day warranty
    > period is not changed when an item is returned, it continues at the
    > original ship date. So if you get one of the "bad" (free profit for
    > newegg.com) version, you have to pay to ship it back, wait who knows
    > how long, but certainly at least a month? then risk getting another bad
    > one and I guess eat the cost because the thirty day warranty is expired
    > or you can just take the better deal of minus 15% plus the shipping fee
    > each way. Terms like that scream drive to and walk into a store
    > somewhere and pay $7.50 more for real customer service. If you want to
    > gamble go to a casino where you get much better odds like a blackjack
    > or a slot machine. Please don't mention newegg.com. I got garbage
    > and only got $9.73 back out of $60, which somehow made since some how?
    > Hey if nothing else do a test and try and send an e-mail or call
    > customer service before you risk putting down your cash for NOTHING.
    > That way you'll know what your in for if you have to deal with them.
    >
    > An interesting study would be to get the data which manufacutures keep
    > in regard to "special testing" that they are forced to do for big "low
    > ball" sellers like newegg.com. Isuspect that quite often the only
    > measure they can take is to eliminate or greatly reduce the amount of
    > quality control testing they do prior to sending out merchandise. If
    > you accept this as reasonable, newegg.com marketing and purchasing is
    > pure genious. Force the manufacturer to cut corners, yet retain the
    > ability to profit when the product is defective. GENIOUS!
    >
    > Stand up for your rights. Don't shop "no service-low ball- resellers"
    > that profit no matter what, even when the item is defective. Customer
    > service has a value, and should be paid for. The couple bucks you save
    > is not worth the risk.
    >
    > Try not doing your job- and making money still? Newegg.com? HA HA HA he
    > hahhhhh
    >

    Newegg rocks...never had a problem!
  15. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "w_tom" <w_tom1@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:41EEF184.C7B81E2A@hotmail.com...

    > Bottom line - your power supply should retail at about $60
    > AND it must provide a long list of numerical specifications.
    > Two simple benchmarks for a minimally acceptable supply.
    >
    > Is a supply too small dangerous? Only where myths are
    > rampant. If the power supply is too small, then the system
    > shuts down. No hardware damage results (assuming the power
    > supply contains those essential functions).
    >
    > Don't fall for those who constantly preach the Tim Allen
    > concept of "more power". Home Improvement was mocking those
    > who promote more watts. And yet still, so many computer
    > assemblers insist we need 400 and 500 watt power supplies -
    > because they never even learned what basic functions are
    > suppose to be included in a power supply. They never even
    > learned basic electrical concepts. You want a long list of
    > numeric specs. Otherwise suspect the worst.

    Thanks for that Tom. Funds are a bit tight at the moment, but when I get
    some more, I think I will get new case and PSU. While I am at it I will
    eventually get that new mobo and processor I want. But in the meantime, at
    least I know it is not going to pose a problem or a fire risk.
  16. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Random Code Generator:

    > newegg.com? your kidding... RMA capital of the net IMO.

    Your opinion is your opinion. A clear majority of buyers have had positive
    experiences and consider newegg among the most reliable and best priced
    retailers on the net.
    --
    Mac Cool
  17. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "Mac Cool" <Mac@2cool.com> wrote in message
    news:Xns95E437718C474MacCool@130.133.1.4...
    > Random Code Generator:
    >
    >> newegg.com? your kidding... RMA capital of the net IMO.
    >
    > Your opinion is your opinion. A clear majority of buyers have had positive
    > experiences and consider newegg among the most reliable and best priced
    > retailers on the net.
    > --
    > Mac Cool

    I do, you only ever hear the nagative comments and not the numerous
    positives.
  18. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Richard Dower:

    >>> newegg.com? your kidding... RMA capital of the net IMO.
    >>
    >> Your opinion is your opinion. A clear majority of buyers have had
    >> positive experiences and consider newegg among the most reliable and
    >> best priced retailers on the net.
    >
    > I do, you only ever hear the nagative comments and not the numerous
    > positives.

    Actually I read an overwhelming amount of positive comments about newegg,
    nearly every day.
    --
    Mac Cool
  19. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Mac Cool <Mac@2cool.com> wrote in
    news:Xns95E49F869C027MacCool@130.133.1.4:

    > Richard Dower:
    >
    >>>> newegg.com? your kidding... RMA capital of the net IMO.
    >>>
    >>> Your opinion is your opinion. A clear majority of buyers have had
    >>> positive experiences and consider newegg among the most reliable and
    >>> best priced retailers on the net.
    >>
    >> I do, you only ever hear the nagative comments and not the numerous
    >> positives.
    >
    > Actually I read an overwhelming amount of positive comments about
    > newegg, nearly every day.

    I've never had a problem with anything I've ordered from Newegg over the
    past 4 or 5 years. I had one bad motherboard which I had to RMA and
    everything was handled quick and painlessly. I've also had good luck with
    ZipZoomFly (formerly Google Gear).
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