Bad Sectors Remover

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsme.general (More info?)

Is there any bad sector remover available for free(preferable)/purchase.


Farhan
7 answers Last reply
More about sectors remover
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsme.general (More info?)

    You don't WANT to remove bad sectors from your hard drive. They are failing
    areas on the drive that have been marked as bad to prevent you from saving
    data to the bad spots. If you remove the bad sector markers your system
    would try to save data in the failing areas and you would likely lose
    whatever was saved there.

    --
    Richard G. Harper [MVP Shell/User] rgharper@gmail.com
    * PLEASE post all messages and replies in the newsgroups
    * for the benefit of all. Private mail is usually not replied to.
    * My website, such as it is ... http://rgharper.mvps.org/
    * HELP us help YOU ... http://www.dts-l.org/goodpost.htm


    "Farhan" <kami@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:%23AcE6a9SFHA.3464@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
    > Is there any bad sector remover available for free(preferable)/purchase.
    >
    >
    > Farhan
    >
    >
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsme.general (More info?)

    On Thu, 28 Apr 2005 00:42:44 +0500, "Farhan" <kami@hotmail.com> wrote:

    >Is there any bad sector remover available for free(preferable)/purchase.

    There's only one context where a bad cluster "remover" is useful, and
    that is where a partition is imaged from a failing HD to a good one,
    thus carrying over the sick HD's bad cluster markers. As these
    markers now have no link to the reality of the new HD, you'd want to
    reset them, and so far I've been doing that on FATxx via DiskEdit.

    There should be an easier way, and probably is.

    However, if you haven't imaged from a sick HD to a good one - i.e. you
    are still on the sick HD - then you should rather replace the sick HD.


    >---------- ----- ---- --- -- - - - -
    Gone to bloggery: http://cquirke.blogspot.com
    >---------- ----- ---- --- -- - - - -
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsme.general (More info?)

    Chris
    IIRC, running ScanDisk in Thorough mode rechecks bad sectors, doesn't it?
    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/q103956/


    --
    Noel Paton (MS-MVP 2002-2005, Windows)

    Nil Carborundum Illegitemi
    http://www.btinternet.com/~winnoel/millsrpch.htm

    http://tinyurl.com/6oztj

    Please read http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm on how to post messages to NG's

    "cquirke (MVP Windows shell/user)" <cquirkenews@nospam.mvps.org> wrote in
    message news:odp571l02c81o8dthf1l3o1hrnnrft7335@4ax.com...
    > On Thu, 28 Apr 2005 00:42:44 +0500, "Farhan" <kami@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >
    >>Is there any bad sector remover available for free(preferable)/purchase.
    >
    > There's only one context where a bad cluster "remover" is useful, and
    > that is where a partition is imaged from a failing HD to a good one,
    > thus carrying over the sick HD's bad cluster markers. As these
    > markers now have no link to the reality of the new HD, you'd want to
    > reset them, and so far I've been doing that on FATxx via DiskEdit.
    >
    > There should be an easier way, and probably is.
    >
    > However, if you haven't imaged from a sick HD to a good one - i.e. you
    > are still on the sick HD - then you should rather replace the sick HD.
    >
    >
    >
    >>---------- ----- ---- --- -- - - - -
    > Gone to bloggery: http://cquirke.blogspot.com
    >>---------- ----- ---- --- -- - - - -
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsme.general (More info?)

    bad sectors are parts of the disk that are unable to have data written due
    to damage (eg they can occur from phsically-jolting or rough handling of the
    system case or dropping the hard drive, which can cause physical damage to
    the disk platters inside the Hard drive casing.


    The read-write heads hover only a hair's with above the surface of the
    disk - any jolt could cause obvious damage from the r/w head impacting the
    surface of the disk.

    "Farhan" <kami@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:%23AcE6a9SFHA.3464@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
    > Is there any bad sector remover available for free(preferable)/purchase.
    >
    >
    > Farhan
    >
    >
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsme.general (More info?)

    we're talking about bad SECTORS not bad clusters - two different things.

    "cquirke (MVP Windows shell/user)" <cquirkenews@nospam.mvps.org> wrote in
    message news:odp571l02c81o8dthf1l3o1hrnnrft7335@4ax.com...
    > On Thu, 28 Apr 2005 00:42:44 +0500, "Farhan" <kami@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >
    >>Is there any bad sector remover available for free(preferable)/purchase.
    >
    > There's only one context where a bad cluster "remover" is useful, and
    > that is where a partition is imaged from a failing HD to a good one,
    > thus carrying over the sick HD's bad cluster markers. As these
    > markers now have no link to the reality of the new HD, you'd want to
    > reset them, and so far I've been doing that on FATxx via DiskEdit.
    >
    > There should be an easier way, and probably is.
    >
    > However, if you haven't imaged from a sick HD to a good one - i.e. you
    > are still on the sick HD - then you should rather replace the sick HD.
    >
    >
    >
    >>---------- ----- ---- --- -- - - - -
    > Gone to bloggery: http://cquirke.blogspot.com
    >>---------- ----- ---- --- -- - - - -
  6. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsme.general (More info?)

    On Sat, 30 Apr 2005 09:49:22 +0100, "Noel Paton"

    >Chris

    Hi!

    >IIRC, running ScanDisk in Thorough mode rechecks bad sectors, doesn't it?

    I don't think it does, unless you force it to via a setting of some
    kind. I say that because I usually see a scan stop and retry bad
    sectors when they are discovered to be bad, but it always glosses over
    existing B(ad) blocks with no pause unless it discoveres a new one.

    In the context of a partition imaged across from a sick HD to a good
    one, simply running Scandisk surface scan (in DOS mode, I don't use
    the Windows one) shows the same B(ad) markers in the same place - a
    consequence of carrying over the FATs verbatim - and doesn't un-mark
    these when it surface scans the volume.

    >http://support.microsoft.com/kb/q103956/

    Not the article I hoped it was (i.e. the one that mentions a possible
    parameter to force re-testing of clusters already marked bad)

    I find it quicker to search for and edit out <BAD> markers in the FATs
    via DiskEdit than look up the setting and redo the surface scan, but I
    agree this is not the best approach for most users ;-)


    >---------- ----- ---- --- -- - - - -
    Gone to bloggery: http://cquirke.blogspot.com
    >---------- ----- ---- --- -- - - - -
  7. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsme.general (More info?)

    On Sun, 1 May 2005 13:25:36 +0800, "Andrew Murray"

    >we're talking about bad SECTORS not bad clusters - two different things.

    Not all that different; a bad cluster is a cluster that contains one
    or more bad sectors. Not to be confused with lost cluster chains,
    which is a file system logic error with no hardware significance.


    >---------- ----- ---- --- -- - - - -
    Gone to bloggery: http://cquirke.blogspot.com
    >---------- ----- ---- --- -- - - - -
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