UPS batteries...

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

Where is the cheapest place to snag UPS batteries. I need 2 bp7-12 for my
Cyberpower 900AVR. It is in warranty, but I'll be hanged if I can find the
sales slip and such. I did a google on it, but I don't know who is reputable
and who is not... I don't want old batteries, but I don't want to pay the
price of a new supply for them either.


Thanks
16 answers Last reply
More about batteries
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    On Thu, 27 Jan 2005 14:58:11 -0500, "Jess Fertudei"
    <not@this.juncture.com> wrote:

    >Where is the cheapest place to snag UPS batteries. I need 2 bp7-12 for my
    >Cyberpower 900AVR. It is in warranty, but I'll be hanged if I can find the
    >sales slip and such. I did a google on it, but I don't know who is reputable
    >and who is not... I don't want old batteries, but I don't want to pay the
    >price of a new supply for them either.

    I bought some from www.batterywholesale.com last year for an old APC UPS
    450. Still kind of expensive though because of the shipping.

    If I wasn't stubborn I'd probably just wait and get a better UPS for cheap
    during the Christmas sales.

    --
    Michael Cecil
    http://home.comcast.net/~macecil/
  2. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "Jess Fertudei" <not@this.juncture.com> wrote in message
    news:xtSdndPBFvhJ2mTcRVn-vw@giganews.com...
    > Where is the cheapest place to snag UPS batteries. I need 2 bp7-12 for my
    > Cyberpower 900AVR. It is in warranty, but I'll be hanged if I can find the
    > sales slip and such. I did a google on it, but I don't know who is
    reputable
    > and who is not... I don't want old batteries, but I don't want to pay the
    > price of a new supply for them either.
    >
    >

    I am in the US, bytheway...
    >
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
  3. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    I have a UPS that requires 12v, so I have mine wired externally wired to s
    deep cycle marine battery. One summer day last year I stayed online for over
    6 hours while the house power was off!

    "Jess Fertudei" <not@this.juncture.com> wrote in message
    news:xtSdndPBFvhJ2mTcRVn-vw@giganews.com...
    > Where is the cheapest place to snag UPS batteries. I need 2 bp7-12 for my
    > Cyberpower 900AVR. It is in warranty, but I'll be hanged if I can find the
    > sales slip and such. I did a google on it, but I don't know who is
    > reputable
    > and who is not... I don't want old batteries, but I don't want to pay the
    > price of a new supply for them either.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
  4. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    In article <ELhKd.7308$Mo5.6897@fe61.usenetserver.com>,
    Woodchuck <stv_euroski@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >I have a UPS that requires 12v, so I have mine wired externally wired to s
    >deep cycle marine battery. One summer day last year I stayed online for over
    >6 hours while the house power was off!


    Does the UPS charging circuit handle the larger battery OK ?

    What is the VA rating on the UPS ?


    --

    a d y k e s @ p a n i x . c o m

    Don't blame me. I voted for Gore.
  5. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    adykes@panix.com (Al Dykes) wrote:

    >In article <ELhKd.7308$Mo5.6897@fe61.usenetserver.com>,
    >Woodchuck <stv_euroski@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >> I have a UPS that requires 12v, so I have mine wired externally
    >> wired to s deep cycle marine battery. One summer day last year I
    >> stayed online for over 6 hours while the house power was off!
    >
    >Does the UPS charging circuit handle the larger battery OK ?

    During charging, measure current flow into the regular battery and
    compare that with current flow into the larger battery (but only if
    you know how to use a multimeter). If the current flow is the same,
    it's probably OK. I think current would be determined by something
    called the internal resistance of the battery.

    It's a good question, in my opinion.

    Ordinarily, the charging circuit would vary charging time according
    to how discharged the regular battery is and that time would vary.
    Circuit specifications should max out at a certain point after
    charging begins. I think it's just like, for example, when you fill
    your car gasoline tank. How large your tank is doesn't matter unless
    the the gasoline station gas is limited, but that is like suggesting
    your house current is limited which it isn't.

    Others might know better, especially in (sci.electronics.*) groups.
    I think you should ask there if you really want to know. Please
    report back the conclusion of any significant discussion.

    Have fun.


    >
    >What is the VA rating on the UPS ?
    >
    >
    >
  6. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    It's on and APC 650w unit. Bigger batteries just take longer to change than
    smaller ones. If the charger inside the UPS is anything like most hi quality
    chargers then it monitors voltage to know when the battery is fully charged.
    I think it functions more like a float or maintainer charger that can be
    left on forever without cooking the battery.

    "Al Dykes" <adykes@panix.com> wrote in message
    news:ctcd5u$4ka$1@panix5.panix.com...
    > In article <ELhKd.7308$Mo5.6897@fe61.usenetserver.com>,
    > Woodchuck <stv_euroski@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >>I have a UPS that requires 12v, so I have mine wired externally wired to s
    >>deep cycle marine battery. One summer day last year I stayed online for
    >>over
    >>6 hours while the house power was off!
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > Does the UPS charging circuit handle the larger battery OK ?
    >
    > What is the VA rating on the UPS ?
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    >
    > a d y k e s @ p a n i x . c o m
    >
    > Don't blame me. I voted for Gore.
  7. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    In article <KcqKd.13$ar2.12@fe39.usenetserver.com>,
    Woodchuck <stv_euroski@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >It's on and APC 650w unit. Bigger batteries just take longer to change than
    >smaller ones. If the charger inside the UPS is anything like most hi quality
    >chargers then it monitors voltage to know when the battery is fully charged.
    >I think it functions more like a float or maintainer charger that can be
    >left on forever without cooking the battery.

    Chargers are specific to the battery chemistry and a mismatch can kill
    the battery. I'll guess that the original were lead gel cells and the
    marine battery is lead acid. CLose enough, and cheap.
    --

    a d y k e s @ p a n i x . c o m

    Don't blame me. I voted for Gore.
  8. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "Jess Fertudei" <not@this.juncture.com> wrote in message
    news:juadnStkuKaI1WTcRVn-iQ@giganews.com...
    >
    > "Jess Fertudei" <not@this.juncture.com> wrote in message
    > news:xtSdndPBFvhJ2mTcRVn-vw@giganews.com...
    >> Where is the cheapest place to snag UPS batteries. I need 2 bp7-12 for my
    >> Cyberpower 900AVR. It is in warranty, but I'll be hanged if I can find
    >> the
    >> sales slip and such. I did a google on it, but I don't know who is
    > reputable
    >> and who is not... I don't want old batteries, but I don't want to pay the
    >> price of a new supply for them either.
    >

    Check to see if there is a Batteries Plus in your area. Take the UPS unit
    to
    them and they will replace the battery for you. Same with your car, truck
    or
    whatever that needs a battery.

    > I am in the US, bytheway...

    I live in Tampa Bay Florida. The US is a big place.
  9. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    In article <ELhKd.7308$Mo5.6897@fe61.usenetserver.com>, stv_euroski@yahoo.com
    says...
    > I have a UPS that requires 12v, so I have mine wired externally wired to s
    > deep cycle marine battery. One summer day last year I stayed online for over
    > 6 hours while the house power was off!
    >

    The float voltage for the gel cells in the UPS will be too high for the marine
    battery. Be sure to check the water level frequently and expect that it will
    require frequent refilling with distilled water. For a specific example, I have
    several APC SmartUPS-XL that allow external battery packs to be connected. The
    battery voltage is nominally 24V. These units float the battery at 27.8V, or 13.9V
    for each 12V battery. The marine batteries should have a float voltage of 13.2 at
    that temperature.
  10. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    In article <xtSdndPBFvhJ2mTcRVn-vw@giganews.com>, not@this.juncture.com says...
    > Where is the cheapest place to snag UPS batteries. I need 2 bp7-12 for my
    > Cyberpower 900AVR. It is in warranty, but I'll be hanged if I can find the
    > sales slip and such. I did a google on it, but I don't know who is reputable
    > and who is not... I don't want old batteries, but I don't want to pay the
    > price of a new supply for them either.
    >

    eBay is a good source for these batteries. Shipping is expensive but the overall
    cost may still be reasonable. I have bought somewhat bigger batteries from one
    eBay seller in Texas, Gruber Power Services, and it was still a good deal sending
    them to California.

    One thing - when you change the batteries, be sure that the UPS is unplugged from
    the wall and turned off. Some UPS designs do not have isolation between the
    batteries and the AC line input.
  11. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    On Thu, 27 Jan 2005 14:58:11 -0500, "Jess Fertudei"
    <not@this.juncture.com> wrote:

    >Where is the cheapest place to snag UPS batteries. I need 2 bp7-12 for my
    >Cyberpower 900AVR. It is in warranty, but I'll be hanged if I can find the
    >sales slip and such. I did a google on it, but I don't know who is reputable
    >and who is not... I don't want old batteries, but I don't want to pay the
    >price of a new supply for them either.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >Thanks
    >
    >
    >
    >


    Try batteries.com
  12. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "Mike Hunt" <thegatekeeper@africamail.com> wrote in message
    news:sq1mv0h91v6l7ndminqgliji8151sn9dis@4ax.com...
    > On Thu, 27 Jan 2005 14:58:11 -0500, "Jess Fertudei"
    > <not@this.juncture.com> wrote:
    >
    >>Where is the cheapest place to snag UPS batteries. I need 2 bp7-12 for my
    >>Cyberpower 900AVR. It is in warranty, but I'll be hanged if I can find the
    >>sales slip and such. I did a google on it, but I don't know who is
    >>reputable
    >>and who is not... I don't want old batteries, but I don't want to pay the
    >>price of a new supply for them either.
    >>Thanks
    >
    > Try batteries.com

    Try Batteries Plus. Look in the phone book. They are a national chain.
  13. you can buy the laptop battery from the site: http://www.laptopbatteryoff.com/
  14. The metal laptop battery connections from 2 to wipe with a damp cloth every three months in an alcohol solvent. This will become more efficient power from a Compaq Presario CQ62 battery. No longer stand while charging the battery on laptop, at least two to three times a week should be used. Lithium ion batteries do not discharge it completely.
  15. the HP Pavilion dv5 Battery have limited battery life. This lifespan rely on its use as well as its maintenance. but how?
  16. :bounce: Deep cycle batteries, also known as gel cell batteries, are commonly found in wheelchairs, radios, and motorcycles. They are considered "premium" batteries, since they do not deteriorate in extreme heat or coldness. They also have the unique property of not spilling or leaking. You will have to purchase a specially made gel cell battery charger to charge this type of battery. There are three cycles in charging a gel battery: bulk, absorption, and float.
    1.Read your battery label for any details concerning charging. Find the amp-hour rating and voltage.
    2.Look through the manual for your deep cycle charger. Every one is slightly different.
    Plug in the charger and set the voltage to match your battery. If the battery has no voltage information on it or is hard to read, set it to 10.5 to 15
    volts. This is the "bulk charge" stage.
    4.Place your battery into the charger, or hook it up so that the positive cable goes into the positive terminal, and the negative cable connects to the
    negative terminal. If there is another dial to indicate a deep cycle battery, turn it on.
    5.Wait for the charger to change over to the "absorption charge" cycle. Voltage is between 14.2 to 15.5.
    6.Wait for the battery to change over to the "float charge" cycle, where the charge goes down to 12.8 to 13.2 volts. You have two options when you see the voltage go down. You can turn off the charger, unplug it, remove the battery and place it back into your device. Or, if you are not going to use the battery right away, you can let it continue charging indefinitely. This cycle will not end unless you turn the charger off. :hello:
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