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Any place on the Web that can help me calculate power cons..

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Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
February 11, 2005 10:56:27 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

Are there any sites on the Web that can help me to figure out exactly
how much power my system is consuming? I can estimate by looking up
power ratings for individual components but it takes a long time and
sometimes it's hard to find numbers for components that don't
specifically say how much power they require. It would be nice if they
were all in a single place.

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Transpose hotmail and mxsmanic in my e-mail address to reach me directly.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
February 11, 2005 10:56:28 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

I recently learned about http://www.jscustompcs.com/power_supply/

Don't know how accurate are their estimates.

May be other such calculators.

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http://www.standards.com/; See Howard Kaikow's web site.
"Mxsmanic" <mxsmanic@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:sllo01lanrfnukkk6qkgkl00696g8p2ded@4ax.com...
> Are there any sites on the Web that can help me to figure out exactly
> how much power my system is consuming? I can estimate by looking up
> power ratings for individual components but it takes a long time and
> sometimes it's hard to find numbers for components that don't
> specifically say how much power they require. It would be nice if they
> were all in a single place.
>
> --
> Transpose hotmail and mxsmanic in my e-mail address to reach me directly.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
February 11, 2005 11:06:32 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

Mxsmanic <mxsmanic@hotmail.com> wrote:

>Are there any sites on the Web that can help me to figure out
>exactly how much power my system is consuming? I can estimate by
>looking up power ratings for individual components but it takes a
>long time and sometimes it's hard to find numbers for components
>that don't specifically say how much power they require. It would
>be nice if they were all in a single place.

If you haven't already thought of this, who knows, but the best
solution might be to use one of those AC wire current meters on your
power supply cable. Yes that means all of the quiescent current will
be included, but at least you could compare it to another system and
it wouldn't be like pulling teeth.

You might get some excellent answers from other regulars here. My
answer isn't the beginning or the end, I realize it probably won't
solve your problem.

Good luck.





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To participate in an open-source Windows macro recorder project,
please see the unmoderated group (comp.windows.open-look). Coding
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will be provided to programmers or expert Windows users, just ask.
Related resources
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
February 11, 2005 1:53:07 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

In article <Xns95FA1576D4188wisdomfolly@151.164.30.48>,
John Doe <jdoe@usenet.is.the.real.thing.com> wrote:
>Mxsmanic <mxsmanic@hotmail.com> wrote:
>
>>Are there any sites on the Web that can help me to figure out
>>exactly how much power my system is consuming? I can estimate by
>>looking up power ratings for individual components but it takes a
>>long time and sometimes it's hard to find numbers for components
>>that don't specifically say how much power they require. It would
>>be nice if they were all in a single place.
>
>If you haven't already thought of this, who knows, but the best
>solution might be to use one of those AC wire current meters on your
>power supply cable. Yes that means all of the quiescent current will
>be included, but at least you could compare it to another system and
>it wouldn't be like pulling teeth.
>
>You might get some excellent answers from other regulars here. My
>answer isn't the beginning or the end, I realize it probably won't
>solve your problem.
>
>Good luck.
>
>
>
>
>
>--
>To participate in an open-source Windows macro recorder project,
>please see the unmoderated group (comp.windows.open-look). Coding
>help is needed. Using VC++ 7. The project files or the program files
>will be provided to programmers or expert Windows users, just ask.


Here's another one:


http://takaman.jp/D/?english

These are interesting, but I don't know if the calcuate startup surge,
so a PSU has to be 2x the running power.

My big desktop PS has been measured as drawing 160W/213VA at the plug
and a very rough runthru the caclulator on the above URL comes out at
209W, but I was guessing about some component models.




--

a d y k e s @ p a n i x . c o m

Don't blame me. I voted for Gore.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
February 11, 2005 1:54:19 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

In article <Xns95FA1576D4188wisdomfolly@151.164.30.48>,
John Doe <jdoe@usenet.is.the.real.thing.com> wrote:
>Mxsmanic <mxsmanic@hotmail.com> wrote:
>
>>Are there any sites on the Web that can help me to figure out
>>exactly how much power my system is consuming? I can estimate by
>>looking up power ratings for individual components but it takes a
>>long time and sometimes it's hard to find numbers for components
>>that don't specifically say how much power they require. It would
>>be nice if they were all in a single place.
>
>If you haven't already thought of this, who knows, but the best
>solution might be to use one of those AC wire current meters on your
>power supply cable. Yes that means all of the quiescent current will
>be included, but at least you could compare it to another system and
>it wouldn't be like pulling teeth.
>
>You might get some excellent answers from other regulars here. My
>answer isn't the beginning or the end, I realize it probably won't
>solve your problem.
>
>Good luck.
>
>
>
>
>
>--
>To participate in an open-source Windows macro recorder project,
>please see the unmoderated group (comp.windows.open-look). Coding
>help is needed. Using VC++ 7. The project files or the program files
>will be provided to programmers or expert Windows users, just ask.


kill-a-watt

http://www.the-gadgeteer.com/killawatt-review.html

About $30.


--

a d y k e s @ p a n i x . c o m

Don't blame me. I voted for Gore.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
February 12, 2005 5:49:47 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

Al Dykes writes:

> Here's another one:
>
>
> http://takaman.jp/D/?english

Excellent!

> These are interesting, but I don't know if the calcuate startup surge,
> so a PSU has to be 2x the running power.

Well, my total is 320W according to this calculator, with everything
running at 100% utilization. It's 300W with 80% utilization.

The PSU is 525W, so hopefully I'm safe and I have a generous margin.

> My big desktop PS has been measured as drawing 160W/213VA at the plug
> and a very rough runthru the caclulator on the above URL comes out at
> 209W, but I was guessing about some component models.

At 80% utilization?

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