RAM module virus???

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

I recently bought a new PC with Win XP Pro preinstalled. First time I turned
it on, it complained that "Windows did not start correctly" or something to
that effect, after which it hung. At reset, it seemed to enter an infinite
reboot sequence. I formatted the disk, and installed a new XP Home licence
instead, since that was what I was going to do anyway (I had good reason to
believe the Pro installation that came with the machine was pirated). Same
result. I sent the computer back to the guy who sold it to me, and after
some investigation, he told me that there was a virus on the RAM module or
RAM chip (not sure of the correct English term). To me, that sounded like
nonsense. The RAM module is just a series of data storage ICs on a small
printed circuit, whose entire contents goes away when you switch off the
machine, right? How can a virus reside there and survive a cold start of the
PC? Am I right, or is there something I'm overlooking?
23 answers Last reply
More about module virus
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    On Wed, 23 Feb 2005 07:46:57 +0100, "toa" <toalmark@hotmail.com>
    wrote:

    >I recently bought a new PC with Win XP Pro preinstalled. First time I turned
    >it on, it complained that "Windows did not start correctly" or something to
    >that effect, after which it hung. At reset, it seemed to enter an infinite
    >reboot sequence. I formatted the disk, and installed a new XP Home licence
    >instead, since that was what I was going to do anyway (I had good reason to
    >believe the Pro installation that came with the machine was pirated). Same
    >result. I sent the computer back to the guy who sold it to me, and after
    >some investigation, he told me that there was a virus on the RAM module or
    >RAM chip (not sure of the correct English term). To me, that sounded like
    >nonsense. The RAM module is just a series of data storage ICs on a small
    >printed circuit, whose entire contents goes away when you switch off the
    >machine, right? How can a virus reside there and survive a cold start of the
    >PC? Am I right, or is there something I'm overlooking?
    >

    Maybe he meant the EPROM chip where the bios is stored? You can get a
    virus there.
  2. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "Trinity" <three@here.invalid> wrote in message
    news:e3mo111i1em9obvi7pjeskt14l925emgs8@4ax.com...
    > On Wed, 23 Feb 2005 07:46:57 +0100, "toa" <toalmark@hotmail.com>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >I recently bought a new PC with Win XP Pro preinstalled. First time I
    turned
    > >it on, it complained that "Windows did not start correctly" or something
    to
    > >that effect, after which it hung. At reset, it seemed to enter an
    infinite
    > >reboot sequence. I formatted the disk, and installed a new XP Home
    licence
    > >instead, since that was what I was going to do anyway (I had good reason
    to
    > >believe the Pro installation that came with the machine was pirated).
    Same
    > >result. I sent the computer back to the guy who sold it to me, and after
    > >some investigation, he told me that there was a virus on the RAM module
    or
    > >RAM chip (not sure of the correct English term). To me, that sounded like
    > >nonsense. The RAM module is just a series of data storage ICs on a small
    > >printed circuit, whose entire contents goes away when you switch off the
    > >machine, right? How can a virus reside there and survive a cold start of
    the
    > >PC? Am I right, or is there something I'm overlooking?
    > >
    >
    > Maybe he meant the EPROM chip where the bios is stored? You can get a
    > virus there.

    Maybe. I've been thinking the same thing myself. But that's not what he
    said. There are viruses around that flash the BIOS, aren't there?
  3. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    On Wed, 23 Feb 2005 11:34:38 +0100, "toa" <toalmark@hotmail.com>
    wrote:


    >Maybe. I've been thinking the same thing myself. But that's not what he
    >said. There are viruses around that flash the BIOS, aren't there?
    >
    Yes. But all modern mb's allow you to block access to the bios once
    you've made your settings.
  4. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "toa" <toalmark@hotmail.com> wrote in message news:BFVSd.9831$Sl3.304988@news4.e.nsc.no...
    > I recently bought a new PC with Win XP Pro preinstalled. First time I turned
    > it on, it complained that "Windows did not start correctly" or something to
    > that effect, after which it hung. At reset, it seemed to enter an infinite
    > reboot sequence. I formatted the disk, and installed a new XP Home licence
    > instead, since that was what I was going to do anyway (I had good reason to
    > believe the Pro installation that came with the machine was pirated). Same
    > result. I sent the computer back to the guy who sold it to me, and after
    > some investigation, he told me that there was a virus on the RAM module or
    > RAM chip (not sure of the correct English term). To me, that sounded like
    > nonsense.

    It is nonsense, but your memory may be defective. Try running
    a memory diagnostic. You can download one from
    http://www.memtest.org.

    --Bob Day
    http://bobday.vze.com
  5. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    > It is nonsense, but your memory may be defective. Try running
    > a memory diagnostic. You can download one from
    > http://www.memtest.org.
    >
    > --Bob Day
    > http://bobday.vze.com
    >
    >

    Oh, he fixed the machine all right, I was just curious as to his explanation
    of the error.
  6. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    toa wrote:
    > I recently bought a new PC with Win XP Pro preinstalled. First time I turned
    > it on, it complained that "Windows did not start correctly" or something to
    > that effect, after which it hung. At reset, it seemed to enter an infinite
    > reboot sequence. I formatted the disk, and installed a new XP Home licence
    > instead, since that was what I was going to do anyway (I had good reason to
    > believe the Pro installation that came with the machine was pirated). Same
    > result. I sent the computer back to the guy who sold it to me, and after
    > some investigation, he told me that there was a virus on the RAM module or
    > RAM chip (not sure of the correct English term). To me, that sounded like
    > nonsense. The RAM module is just a series of data storage ICs on a small
    > printed circuit, whose entire contents goes away when you switch off the
    > machine, right? How can a virus reside there and survive a cold start of the
    > PC? Am I right, or is there something I'm overlooking?
    >
    >

    You are correct, and this guy is jerking you around. Once the power is
    off, then the ram is cleared. Serves you right for buying from software
    pirates, though.

    --
    spammage trappage: replace fishies_ with yahoo

    I'm going to die rather sooner than I'd like. I tried to protect my
    neighbours from crime, and became the victim of it. Complications in
    hospital following this resulted in a serious illness. I now need a bone
    marrow transplant. Many people around the world are waiting for a marrow
    transplant, too. Please volunteer to be a marrow donor:
    http://www.abmdr.org.au/
    http://www.marrow.org/
  7. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    spodosaurus <spodosaurus@_yahoo_.com> wrote:
    >toa wrote:

    >> I recently bought a new PC with Win XP Pro preinstalled. First
    >> time I turned it on, it complained that "Windows did not start
    >> correctly" or something to that effect, after which it hung. At
    >> reset, it seemed to enter an infinite reboot sequence. I
    >> formatted the disk, and installed a new XP Home licence instead,
    >> since that was what I was going to do anyway (I had good reason
    >> to believe the Pro installation that came with the machine was
    >> pirated). Same result. I sent the computer back to the guy who
    >> sold it to me, and after some investigation, he told me that
    >> there was a virus on the RAM module or RAM chip (not sure of the
    >> correct English term). To me, that sounded like nonsense. The RAM
    >> module is just a series of data storage ICs on a small printed
    >> circuit, whose entire contents goes away when you switch off the
    >> machine, right? How can a virus reside there and survive a cold
    >> start of the PC? Am I right, or is there something I'm
    >> overlooking?

    >You are correct, and this guy is jerking you around. Once the power
    >is off, then the ram is cleared. Serves you right for buying from
    >software pirates, though.

    Apparently you are assuming things.


    --
    Writing the first dynamically timed systemwide macro recorder for
    Windows XP. Please see (comp.windows.open-look). Coding help is
    needed, using VC++ 7.
  8. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    John Doe wrote:
    > spodosaurus <spodosaurus@_yahoo_.com> wrote:
    >
    >>toa wrote:
    >
    >
    >>>I recently bought a new PC with Win XP Pro preinstalled. First
    >>>time I turned it on, it complained that "Windows did not start
    >>>correctly" or something to that effect, after which it hung. At
    >>>reset, it seemed to enter an infinite reboot sequence. I
    >>>formatted the disk, and installed a new XP Home licence instead,
    >>>since that was what I was going to do anyway (I had good reason
    >>>to believe the Pro installation that came with the machine was
    >>>pirated). Same result. I sent the computer back to the guy who
    >>>sold it to me, and after some investigation, he told me that
    >>>there was a virus on the RAM module or RAM chip (not sure of the
    >>>correct English term). To me, that sounded like nonsense. The RAM
    >>>module is just a series of data storage ICs on a small printed
    >>>circuit, whose entire contents goes away when you switch off the
    >>>machine, right? How can a virus reside there and survive a cold
    >>>start of the PC? Am I right, or is there something I'm
    >>>overlooking?
    >
    >
    >>You are correct, and this guy is jerking you around. Once the power
    >>is off, then the ram is cleared. Serves you right for buying from
    >>software pirates, though.
    >
    >
    > Apparently you are assuming things.

    Feel free to point those things out.


    --
    spammage trappage: replace fishies_ with yahoo

    I'm going to die rather sooner than I'd like. I tried to protect my
    neighbours from crime, and became the victim of it. Complications in
    hospital following this resulted in a serious illness. I now need a bone
    marrow transplant. Many people around the world are waiting for a marrow
    transplant, too. Please volunteer to be a marrow donor:
    http://www.abmdr.org.au/
    http://www.marrow.org/
  9. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "spodosaurus" <spodosaurus@_yahoo_.com> wrote in message
    news:421c4532$1@quokka.wn.com.au...
    > John Doe wrote:
    > > spodosaurus <spodosaurus@_yahoo_.com> wrote:
    > >
    > >>toa wrote:
    > >
    > >
    > >>>I recently bought a new PC with Win XP Pro preinstalled. First
    > >>>time I turned it on, it complained that "Windows did not start
    > >>>correctly" or something to that effect, after which it hung. At
    > >>>reset, it seemed to enter an infinite reboot sequence. I
    > >>>formatted the disk, and installed a new XP Home licence instead,
    > >>>since that was what I was going to do anyway (I had good reason
    > >>>to believe the Pro installation that came with the machine was
    > >>>pirated). Same result. I sent the computer back to the guy who
    > >>>sold it to me, and after some investigation, he told me that
    > >>>there was a virus on the RAM module or RAM chip (not sure of the
    > >>>correct English term). To me, that sounded like nonsense. The RAM
    > >>>module is just a series of data storage ICs on a small printed
    > >>>circuit, whose entire contents goes away when you switch off the
    > >>>machine, right? How can a virus reside there and survive a cold
    > >>>start of the PC? Am I right, or is there something I'm
    > >>>overlooking?
    > >
    > >
    > >>You are correct, and this guy is jerking you around. Once the power
    > >>is off, then the ram is cleared. Serves you right for buying from
    > >>software pirates, though.
    > >
    > >
    > > Apparently you are assuming things.
    >
    > Feel free to point those things out.
    >
    >
    > --

    I see nothing wrong with buying a machine with pirated software, as long as
    I immediately delete that software and replace it with original, paid-for
    software.
  10. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    spodosaurus <spodosaurus@_yahoo_.com> wrote:
    >John Doe wrote:
    >> spodosaurus <spodosaurus@_yahoo_.com> wrote:
    >>> toa wrote:

    >>>> ...I formatted the disk, and installed a new XP Home licence
    >>>> instead, since that was what I was going to do anyway (I had
    >>>> good reason to believe the Pro installation that came with the
    >>>> machine was pirated). Same result. I sent the computer back to
    >>>> the guy who sold it to me, ...

    >>> You are correct, and this guy is jerking you around. Once the
    >>> power is off, then the ram is cleared. Serves you right for
    >>> buying from software pirates, though.
    >>
    >> Apparently you are assuming things.
    >
    >Feel free to point those things out.

    He was buying a computer, not software. How would he know or even
    suspect that windows was pirated until he got the system? He said the
    windows "that came with the system" was suspect. To me it sounds like
    he didn't suspect that until he got the system. He might have been
    planning to install his home version before he even received the
    system. Maybe he liked the hardware but did not like the idea of
    using Windows XP Pro.


    --
    Writing the first dynamically timed systemwide macro recorder for
    Windows XP. Please see (comp.windows.open-look). Coding help is
    needed, using VC++ 7.
  11. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    toa wrote:
    > "spodosaurus" <spodosaurus@_yahoo_.com> wrote in message
    > news:421c4532$1@quokka.wn.com.au...
    >
    >>John Doe wrote:
    >>
    >>>spodosaurus <spodosaurus@_yahoo_.com> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>toa wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>>I recently bought a new PC with Win XP Pro preinstalled. First
    >>>>>time I turned it on, it complained that "Windows did not start
    >>>>>correctly" or something to that effect, after which it hung. At
    >>>>>reset, it seemed to enter an infinite reboot sequence. I
    >>>>>formatted the disk, and installed a new XP Home licence instead,
    >>>>>since that was what I was going to do anyway (I had good reason
    >>>>>to believe the Pro installation that came with the machine was
    >>>>>pirated). Same result. I sent the computer back to the guy who
    >>>>>sold it to me, and after some investigation, he told me that
    >>>>>there was a virus on the RAM module or RAM chip (not sure of the
    >>>>>correct English term). To me, that sounded like nonsense. The RAM
    >>>>>module is just a series of data storage ICs on a small printed
    >>>>>circuit, whose entire contents goes away when you switch off the
    >>>>>machine, right? How can a virus reside there and survive a cold
    >>>>>start of the PC? Am I right, or is there something I'm
    >>>>>overlooking?
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>You are correct, and this guy is jerking you around. Once the power
    >>>>is off, then the ram is cleared. Serves you right for buying from
    >>>>software pirates, though.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>Apparently you are assuming things.
    >>
    >>Feel free to point those things out.
    >>
    >>
    >>--
    >
    >
    > I see nothing wrong with buying a machine with pirated software, as long as
    > I immediately delete that software and replace it with original, paid-for
    > software.

    If you're talking second hand, then yes, but if you're talking about
    buying it from a retail outlet, then that's a different matter entirely.
    If they're willing to steal software, do you REALLY think they're going
    to be looking after your best interests in the components they put in
    your system? Do you think they're going to be careful in the handling
    and assembly of it? Do you think they're going to be conducting business
    practices in a way that does not propogate virus infection to their
    clients PCs? etc etc


    --
    spammage trappage: replace fishies_ with yahoo

    I'm going to die rather sooner than I'd like. I tried to protect my
    neighbours from crime, and became the victim of it. Complications in
    hospital following this resulted in a serious illness. I now need a bone
    marrow transplant. Many people around the world are waiting for a marrow
    transplant, too. Please volunteer to be a marrow donor:
    http://www.abmdr.org.au/
    http://www.marrow.org/
  12. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "spodosaurus" <spodosaurus@_yahoo_.com> wrote in message
    news:421c5055$1@quokka.wn.com.au...
    > toa wrote:
    > > "spodosaurus" <spodosaurus@_yahoo_.com> wrote in message
    > > news:421c4532$1@quokka.wn.com.au...
    > >
    > >>John Doe wrote:
    > >>
    > >>>spodosaurus <spodosaurus@_yahoo_.com> wrote:
    > >>>
    > >>>
    > >>>>toa wrote:
    > >>>
    > >>>
    > >>>>>I recently bought a new PC with Win XP Pro preinstalled. First
    > >>>>>time I turned it on, it complained that "Windows did not start
    > >>>>>correctly" or something to that effect, after which it hung. At
    > >>>>>reset, it seemed to enter an infinite reboot sequence. I
    > >>>>>formatted the disk, and installed a new XP Home licence instead,
    > >>>>>since that was what I was going to do anyway (I had good reason
    > >>>>>to believe the Pro installation that came with the machine was
    > >>>>>pirated). Same result. I sent the computer back to the guy who
    > >>>>>sold it to me, and after some investigation, he told me that
    > >>>>>there was a virus on the RAM module or RAM chip (not sure of the
    > >>>>>correct English term). To me, that sounded like nonsense. The RAM
    > >>>>>module is just a series of data storage ICs on a small printed
    > >>>>>circuit, whose entire contents goes away when you switch off the
    > >>>>>machine, right? How can a virus reside there and survive a cold
    > >>>>>start of the PC? Am I right, or is there something I'm
    > >>>>>overlooking?
    > >>>
    > >>>
    > >>>>You are correct, and this guy is jerking you around. Once the power
    > >>>>is off, then the ram is cleared. Serves you right for buying from
    > >>>>software pirates, though.
    > >>>
    > >>>
    > >>>Apparently you are assuming things.
    > >>
    > >>Feel free to point those things out.
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>--
    > >
    > >
    > > I see nothing wrong with buying a machine with pirated software, as long
    as
    > > I immediately delete that software and replace it with original,
    paid-for
    > > software.
    >
    > If you're talking second hand, then yes, but if you're talking about
    > buying it from a retail outlet, then that's a different matter entirely.
    > If they're willing to steal software, do you REALLY think they're going
    > to be looking after your best interests in the components they put in
    > your system? Do you think they're going to be careful in the handling
    > and assembly of it? Do you think they're going to be conducting business
    > practices in a way that does not propogate virus infection to their
    > clients PCs? etc etc
    >

    Ah, so you think I'm just plain stupid then, not morally corrupt. Good. I
    can live with that. :)
  13. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    toa wrote:
    > "spodosaurus" <spodosaurus@_yahoo_.com> wrote in message
    > news:421c5055$1@quokka.wn.com.au...
    >
    >>toa wrote:
    >>
    >>>"spodosaurus" <spodosaurus@_yahoo_.com> wrote in message
    >>>news:421c4532$1@quokka.wn.com.au...
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>John Doe wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>>spodosaurus <spodosaurus@_yahoo_.com> wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>toa wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>>I recently bought a new PC with Win XP Pro preinstalled. First
    >>>>>>>time I turned it on, it complained that "Windows did not start
    >>>>>>>correctly" or something to that effect, after which it hung. At
    >>>>>>>reset, it seemed to enter an infinite reboot sequence. I
    >>>>>>>formatted the disk, and installed a new XP Home licence instead,
    >>>>>>>since that was what I was going to do anyway (I had good reason
    >>>>>>>to believe the Pro installation that came with the machine was
    >>>>>>>pirated). Same result. I sent the computer back to the guy who
    >>>>>>>sold it to me, and after some investigation, he told me that
    >>>>>>>there was a virus on the RAM module or RAM chip (not sure of the
    >>>>>>>correct English term). To me, that sounded like nonsense. The RAM
    >>>>>>>module is just a series of data storage ICs on a small printed
    >>>>>>>circuit, whose entire contents goes away when you switch off the
    >>>>>>>machine, right? How can a virus reside there and survive a cold
    >>>>>>>start of the PC? Am I right, or is there something I'm
    >>>>>>>overlooking?
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>You are correct, and this guy is jerking you around. Once the power
    >>>>>>is off, then the ram is cleared. Serves you right for buying from
    >>>>>>software pirates, though.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>Apparently you are assuming things.
    >>>>
    >>>>Feel free to point those things out.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>--
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>I see nothing wrong with buying a machine with pirated software, as long
    >
    > as
    >
    >>>I immediately delete that software and replace it with original,
    >
    > paid-for
    >
    >>>software.
    >>
    >>If you're talking second hand, then yes, but if you're talking about
    >>buying it from a retail outlet, then that's a different matter entirely.
    >>If they're willing to steal software, do you REALLY think they're going
    >>to be looking after your best interests in the components they put in
    >>your system? Do you think they're going to be careful in the handling
    >>and assembly of it? Do you think they're going to be conducting business
    >>practices in a way that does not propogate virus infection to their
    >>clients PCs? etc etc
    >>
    >
    >
    > Ah, so you think I'm just plain stupid then, not morally corrupt. Good. I
    > can live with that. :)

    We all get tempted sometimes to chase bargains...that's how we learn
    'you get what you pay for' and it's a lesson we all get taught sooner or
    later :-)


    --
    spammage trappage: replace fishies_ with yahoo

    I'm going to die rather sooner than I'd like. I tried to protect my
    neighbours from crime, and became the victim of it. Complications in
    hospital following this resulted in a serious illness. I now need a bone
    marrow transplant. Many people around the world are waiting for a marrow
    transplant, too. Please volunteer to be a marrow donor:
    http://www.abmdr.org.au/
    http://www.marrow.org/
  14. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    John Doe wrote:
    > spodosaurus <spodosaurus@_yahoo_.com> wrote:
    >
    >>John Doe wrote:
    >>
    >>>spodosaurus <spodosaurus@_yahoo_.com> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>toa wrote:
    >
    >
    >>>>>...I formatted the disk, and installed a new XP Home licence
    >>>>>instead, since that was what I was going to do anyway (I had
    >>>>>good reason to believe the Pro installation that came with the
    >>>>>machine was pirated). Same result. I sent the computer back to
    >>>>>the guy who sold it to me, ...
    >
    >
    >>>>You are correct, and this guy is jerking you around. Once the
    >>>>power is off, then the ram is cleared. Serves you right for
    >>>>buying from software pirates, though.
    >>>
    >>>Apparently you are assuming things.
    >>
    >>Feel free to point those things out.
    >
    >
    > He was buying a computer, not software. How would he know or even
    > suspect that windows was pirated until he got the system?

    1. If he wasn't buying software and there was software on the computer
    that is by definition piracy.
    2. He stated straight out he suspected it was pirate.


    --
    spammage trappage: replace fishies_ with yahoo

    I'm going to die rather sooner than I'd like. I tried to protect my
    neighbours from crime, and became the victim of it. Complications in
    hospital following this resulted in a serious illness. I now need a bone
    marrow transplant. Many people around the world are waiting for a marrow
    transplant, too. Please volunteer to be a marrow donor:
    http://www.abmdr.org.au/
    http://www.marrow.org/
  15. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    To be precise, it probably wasn't piracy until the moment I received the PC.
    This guy assembles PCs himself, and I believe he has some maintenance
    licence of XP that entitles him to use it to check out each new machine
    before he ships it off. However, the moment he ships it off to me without
    either 1) wiping the disk or 2) charge me for an OEM licence that he has
    himself bought somewhere, it becomes piracy. Ok, so I commited piracy for
    the 3 hours it took me to get the machine home, wipe the disk and install my
    own, legal copy of Win XP home. I really cannot see anything wrong in that.
  16. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    spodosaurus <spodosaurus@_yahoo_.com> wrote:

    >John Doe wrote:
    >> spodosaurus <spodosaurus@_yahoo_.com> wrote:
    >>
    >>> John Doe wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> spodosaurus <spodosaurus@_yahoo_.com> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> toa wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>>>> ...I formatted the disk, and installed a new XP Home licence
    >>>>>> instead, since that was what I was going to do anyway (I had
    >>>>>> good reason to believe the Pro installation that came with
    >>>>>> the machine was pirated). Same result. I sent the computer
    >>>>>> back to the guy who sold it to me, ...
    >>
    >>>>> You are correct, and this guy is jerking you around. Once the
    >>>>> power is off, then the ram is cleared. Serves you right for
    >>>>> buying from software pirates, though.
    >>>>
    >>>> Apparently you are assuming things.
    >>>
    >>> Feel free to point those things out.
    >>
    >> He was buying a computer, not software. How would he know or even
    >> suspect that windows was pirated until he got the system?
    >
    >1. If he wasn't buying software and there was software on the
    >computer that is by definition piracy.

    You won't find many computers, even second-hand and homebuilt, that
    don't come with preinstalled windows, at least not in the United
    States.

    >2. He stated straight out he suspected it was pirate.

    After it "came with the machine".

    He might be dealing with a shady seller, but by his post he didn't
    necessarily know that to begin with.


    --
    Writing the first dynamically timed systemwide macro recorder for
    Windows XP. Please see (comp.windows.open-look). Coding help is
    needed, using VC++ 7.
  17. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Don't feed the spammer - doe - troll


    "spodosaurus" <spodosaurus@_yahoo_.com> wrote in message
    news:421c6787$1@quokka.wn.com.au...
    > John Doe wrote:
    >> spodosaurus <spodosaurus@_yahoo_.com> wrote:
    >>
    >>>John Doe wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>spodosaurus <spodosaurus@_yahoo_.com> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>>toa wrote:
    >>
    >>
  18. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    toa wrote:
    > To be precise, it probably wasn't piracy until the moment I received the PC.
    > This guy assembles PCs himself, and I believe he has some maintenance
    > licence of XP that entitles him to use it to check out each new machine
    > before he ships it off. However, the moment he ships it off to me without
    > either 1) wiping the disk or 2) charge me for an OEM licence that he has
    > himself bought somewhere, it becomes piracy. Ok, so I commited piracy for
    > the 3 hours it took me to get the machine home, wipe the disk and install my
    > own, legal copy of Win XP home. I really cannot see anything wrong in that.
    >
    >

    It's no big deal, but it does sort of reflect the quality of the
    business you're dealing with. Personally, I'd suspect the quality of the
    components themselves, the condition of said components (customer
    returns reused in another machine), or the handling and assembly of the
    components before I'd suspect a virus (but I have fairly limited info as
    to what's going on with your system). If there is a virus hiding in the
    eprom chip, given the practices of the place you bought the computer,
    I'd suspect it got on their from thier network as they were putting the
    copy of winxp on your new system. I've seen that happen before, where
    dodgy shops try to blame the customer (and charge the customer) for
    reinstalling windows on their new PC after a virus buggered up the works
    when it was the shop that had the virus in their copy of windows and was
    putting it on clients' PCs.

    Ari


    --
    spammage trappage: replace fishies_ with yahoo

    I'm going to die rather sooner than I'd like. I tried to protect my
    neighbours from crime, and became the victim of it. Complications in
    hospital following this resulted in a serious illness. I now need a bone
    marrow transplant. Many people around the world are waiting for a marrow
    transplant, too. Please volunteer to be a marrow donor:
    http://www.abmdr.org.au/
    http://www.marrow.org/
  19. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Stalker troll.

    "JAD" <kapasitor@earthcharter.net> wrote:

    >Path: newssvr30.news.prodigy.com!newsdbm05.news.prodigy.com!newsdst02.news.prodigy.com!newsmst01a.news.prodigy.com!prodigy.com!newscon06.news.prodigy.com!prodigy.net!border1.nntp.dca.giganews.com!border2.nntp.dca.giganews.com!nntp.giganews.com!cyclone-sf.pbi.net!216.218.192.242!news.he.net!newsfeed1.easynews.com!easynews.com!easynews!hwmnpeer01.phx!hwmedia!hw-poster!fe03.lga.POSTED!53ab2750!not-for-mail
    >From: "JAD" <kapasitor @earthcharter.net>
    >Newsgroups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
    >References: <BFVSd.9831$Sl3.304988@news4.e.nsc.no> <421c3a30$1@quokka.wn.com.au> <Xns960617F302062wisdomfolly@151.164.30.44> <421c4532$1@quokka.wn.com.au> <Xns960635771AFBCwisdomfolly@151.164.30.48> <421c6787$1@quokka.wn.com.au>
    >Subject: Re: RAM module virus???
    >Lines: 17
    >X-Priority: 3
    >X-MSMail-Priority: Normal
    >X-Newsreader: Microsoft Outlook Express 6.00.2900.2180
    >X-MimeOLE: Produced By Microsoft MimeOLE V6.00.2900.2180
    >X-RFC2646: Format=Flowed; Response
    >Message-ID: <0q6Td.16145$gp2.12388 @fe03.lga>
    >X-Trace: idmkcnjgmiagocdemfamekcbgdcopmkedganbaljmhbkdppjfcccdnnagloelenecnllljilelhgppakokpdejkkbfnjfihbgpekljlgjknadcnbadliocknfigebenhegcmjhhibopfakdb
    >NNTP-Posting-Date: Wed, 23 Feb 2005 14:17:48 MST
    >Date: Wed, 23 Feb 2005 13:09:53 -0800
    >Xref: newsmst01a.news.prodigy.com alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt:430169
    >
    >Don't feed the spammer - doe - troll
    >
    >
    See also:
    JAD (jde)
    JAD (Kapasitor @coldmail.com)
    JAD (jdemma25 @eartink.net)
  20. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "toa" <toalmark@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:BFVSd.9831$Sl3.304988@news4.e.nsc.no...
    > I recently bought a new PC with Win XP Pro preinstalled. First time I
    turned
    > it on, it complained that "Windows did not start correctly" or something
    to
    > that effect, after which it hung. At reset, it seemed to enter an infinite
    > reboot sequence. I formatted the disk, and installed a new XP Home licence
    > instead, since that was what I was going to do anyway (I had good reason
    to
    > believe the Pro installation that came with the machine was pirated). Same
    > result. I sent the computer back to the guy who sold it to me, and after
    > some investigation, he told me that there was a virus on the RAM module or
    > RAM chip (not sure of the correct English term). To me, that sounded like
    > nonsense. The RAM module is just a series of data storage ICs on a small
    > printed circuit, whose entire contents goes away when you switch off the
    > machine, right? How can a virus reside there and survive a cold start of
    the
    > PC? Am I right, or is there something I'm overlooking?
    >
    >

    Preinstalled HOW, exactly? Does this system have a P4 Prescott processor?
    The symptom it has perfectly matches the symptom of the incorrect microcode
    (in the BIOS) conflicting with later versions of Windows XP on systems with
    Prescott core P4 chips. I can see how this would easily happen if you
    bought the system from the vendor, who ghosted the install from another
    machine that had a Northwood core P4. Still, any reputable computer vendor
    should have been aware of the microcode problem with certain mainboards and
    the Prescott core P4 processor, if that is what is happening. Oh, and your
    install of XP might have been no different than the one the vendor put on
    (other than being home instead of pro). Thus, the problem is still present
    after reinstall. -Dave
  21. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "Dave C." <noway@nohow.not> wrote in message
    news:QFoTd.4991$873.2162@newsread3.news.pas.earthlink.net...
    >
    > "toa" <toalmark@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    > news:BFVSd.9831$Sl3.304988@news4.e.nsc.no...
    > > I recently bought a new PC with Win XP Pro preinstalled. First time I
    > turned
    > > it on, it complained that "Windows did not start correctly" or something
    > to
    > > that effect, after which it hung. At reset, it seemed to enter an
    infinite
    > > reboot sequence. I formatted the disk, and installed a new XP Home
    licence
    > > instead, since that was what I was going to do anyway (I had good reason
    > to
    > > believe the Pro installation that came with the machine was pirated).
    Same
    > > result. I sent the computer back to the guy who sold it to me, and after
    > > some investigation, he told me that there was a virus on the RAM module
    or
    > > RAM chip (not sure of the correct English term). To me, that sounded
    like
    > > nonsense. The RAM module is just a series of data storage ICs on a small
    > > printed circuit, whose entire contents goes away when you switch off the
    > > machine, right? How can a virus reside there and survive a cold start of
    > the
    > > PC? Am I right, or is there something I'm overlooking?
    > >
    > >
    >
    > Preinstalled HOW, exactly? Does this system have a P4 Prescott processor?
    > The symptom it has perfectly matches the symptom of the incorrect
    microcode
    > (in the BIOS) conflicting with later versions of Windows XP on systems
    with
    > Prescott core P4 chips. I can see how this would easily happen if you
    > bought the system from the vendor, who ghosted the install from another
    > machine that had a Northwood core P4. Still, any reputable computer
    vendor
    > should have been aware of the microcode problem with certain mainboards
    and
    > the Prescott core P4 processor, if that is what is happening. Oh, and
    your
    > install of XP might have been no different than the one the vendor put on
    > (other than being home instead of pro). Thus, the problem is still
    present
    > after reinstall. -Dave
    >
    >

    This is interesting. As I said in another posting, the guy fixed the problem
    later on. But does this mean that if I wipe the disk and reinstall XP, the
    problem will resurface? Does XP do something to the BIOS on install that
    causes this problem?
  22. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    toa wrote:
    > "Dave C." <noway@nohow.not> wrote in message
    > news:QFoTd.4991$873.2162@newsread3.news.pas.earthlink.net...
    >
    >>"toa" <toalmark@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    >>news:BFVSd.9831$Sl3.304988@news4.e.nsc.no...
    >>
    >>>I recently bought a new PC with Win XP Pro preinstalled. First time I
    >>
    >>turned
    >>
    >>>it on, it complained that "Windows did not start correctly" or something
    >>
    >>to
    >>
    >>>that effect, after which it hung. At reset, it seemed to enter an
    >
    > infinite
    >
    >>>reboot sequence. I formatted the disk, and installed a new XP Home
    >
    > licence
    >
    >>>instead, since that was what I was going to do anyway (I had good reason
    >>
    >>to
    >>
    >>>believe the Pro installation that came with the machine was pirated).
    >
    > Same
    >
    >>>result. I sent the computer back to the guy who sold it to me, and after
    >>>some investigation, he told me that there was a virus on the RAM module
    >
    > or
    >
    >>>RAM chip (not sure of the correct English term). To me, that sounded
    >
    > like
    >
    >>>nonsense. The RAM module is just a series of data storage ICs on a small
    >>>printed circuit, whose entire contents goes away when you switch off the
    >>>machine, right? How can a virus reside there and survive a cold start of
    >>
    >>the
    >>
    >>>PC? Am I right, or is there something I'm overlooking?
    >>>
    >>>
    >>
    >>Preinstalled HOW, exactly? Does this system have a P4 Prescott processor?
    >>The symptom it has perfectly matches the symptom of the incorrect
    >
    > microcode
    >
    >>(in the BIOS) conflicting with later versions of Windows XP on systems
    >
    > with
    >
    >>Prescott core P4 chips. I can see how this would easily happen if you
    >>bought the system from the vendor, who ghosted the install from another
    >>machine that had a Northwood core P4. Still, any reputable computer
    >
    > vendor
    >
    >>should have been aware of the microcode problem with certain mainboards
    >
    > and
    >
    >>the Prescott core P4 processor, if that is what is happening. Oh, and
    >
    > your
    >
    >>install of XP might have been no different than the one the vendor put on
    >>(other than being home instead of pro). Thus, the problem is still
    >
    > present
    >
    >>after reinstall. -Dave
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
    > This is interesting. As I said in another posting, the guy fixed the problem
    > later on. But does this mean that if I wipe the disk and reinstall XP, the
    > problem will resurface? Does XP do something to the BIOS on install that
    > causes this problem?
    >
    >

    No.

    --
    spammage trappage: replace fishies_ with yahoo

    I'm going to die rather sooner than I'd like. I tried to protect my
    neighbours from crime, and became the victim of it. Complications in
    hospital following this resulted in a serious illness. I now need a bone
    marrow transplant. Many people around the world are waiting for a marrow
    transplant, too. Please volunteer to be a marrow donor:
    http://www.abmdr.org.au/
    http://www.marrow.org/
  23. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    >
    > This is interesting. As I said in another posting, the guy fixed the
    problem
    > later on. But does this mean that if I wipe the disk and reinstall XP, the
    > problem will resurface? Does XP do something to the BIOS on install that
    > causes this problem?

    No, it is a problem with Windows XP's service packs. Well, actually, to be
    absolutely accurate, it is a problem with the BIOS of certain motherboards.
    However, Microsoft has the ability to fix the problem from their end (a LOT
    easier than re-programming thousands of mainboard BIOS chips and then
    forcing an upgrade on users who don't want one) but Microsoft chooses not
    to. Is it possible that the problem could re-surface again? Yes. It's
    possible. What you should do is, BEFORE trying to reinstall XP (if you ever
    need to), flash your BIOS to the latest version available, downloaded
    straight from whoever made your mainboard. That won't guarantee that the
    problem is fixed, but it is the best chance you've got to avoid a repeat.

    However, it's possible that your BIOS is OK, already. If it was the
    microcode problem that you were experiencing earlier, it's possible that
    your computer vendor already upgraded the BIOS for you. -Dave
Ask a new question

Read More

Homebuilt RAM Windows XP Systems