Laptop

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsme.general (More info?)

Has anyone heard of a laptop being charged and causing a major fire due to a
short. Thats what I understand happened to my next door neighbour. His extra
bedroom on the second floor is turned into an office, and he forgot about it.
I dont know too many details but apparently the fire started between the
ceiling and the attic...I've never heard of such a thing, you??

--
cogito ergo sum
8 answers Last reply
More about laptop
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsme.general (More info?)

    From: "PAT (Paul)" <PATPaul@discussions.microsoft.com>

    | Has anyone heard of a laptop being charged and causing a major fire due to a
    | short. Thats what I understand happened to my next door neighbour. His extra
    | bedroom on the second floor is turned into an office, and he forgot about it.
    | I dont know too many details but apparently the fire started between the
    | ceiling and the attic...I've never heard of such a thing, you??
    |
    | --
    | cogito ergo sum

    Dell had a recall of notebook power supplies in 2004 indicating they were faulty and could
    cause a fire.

    http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/prerel/prhtml05/05004.html

    --
    Dave
    http://www.claymania.com/removal-trojan-adware.html
    http://www.ik-cs.com/got-a-virus.htm
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsme.general (More info?)

    Thanks Dave. Will relay the info just in case.
    Regards
    --
    cogito ergo sum


    "David H. Lipman" wrote:

    > From: "PAT (Paul)" <PATPaul@discussions.microsoft.com>
    >
    > | Has anyone heard of a laptop being charged and causing a major fire due to a
    > | short. Thats what I understand happened to my next door neighbour. His extra
    > | bedroom on the second floor is turned into an office, and he forgot about it.
    > | I dont know too many details but apparently the fire started between the
    > | ceiling and the attic...I've never heard of such a thing, you??
    > |
    > | --
    > | cogito ergo sum
    >
    > Dell had a recall of notebook power supplies in 2004 indicating they were faulty and could
    > cause a fire.
    >
    > http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/prerel/prhtml05/05004.html
    >
    > --
    > Dave
    > http://www.claymania.com/removal-trojan-adware.html
    > http://www.ik-cs.com/got-a-virus.htm
    >
    >
    >
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsme.general (More info?)

    While I think it rather unlikely that the laptop was placed at the suspected
    ignition location, "between the ceiling and the attic", while being
    charged, I do think any wiring there could have been gnawed by rodents,
    damaged by unobservant attic users, or roofers, etc, initiating a fire.

    --
    Jack E. Martinelli 2002-05 MS MVP for Shell/User / DTS
    Help us help you: http://www.dts-L.org/goodpost.htm
    In Memorium: Alex Nichol
    http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/meetexperts/nichol.mspx
    Your cooperation is very appreciated.
    ------
    "David H. Lipman" <DLipman~nospam~@Verizon.Net> wrote in message
    news:%23eYO66RcFHA.3040@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
    > From: "PAT (Paul)" <PATPaul@discussions.microsoft.com>
    >
    > | Has anyone heard of a laptop being charged and causing a major fire due
    to a
    > | short. Thats what I understand happened to my next door neighbour. His
    extra
    > | bedroom on the second floor is turned into an office, and he forgot
    about it.
    > | I dont know too many details but apparently the fire started between
    the
    > | ceiling and the attic...I've never heard of such a thing, you??
    > |
    > | --
    > | cogito ergo sum
    >
    > Dell had a recall of notebook power supplies in 2004 indicating they were
    faulty and could
    > cause a fire.
    >
    > http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/prerel/prhtml05/05004.html
    >
    > --
    > Dave
    > http://www.claymania.com/removal-trojan-adware.html
    > http://www.ik-cs.com/got-a-virus.htm
    >
    >
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsme.general (More info?)

    Jack
    No, the laptop was not actually physically put in the ceiling, but the wall
    plug wiring routing is probably through the ceiling, this is almost standard
    practice in order to feed other plugs, ceiling lights, etc. My thinking is
    that the overheating drew too much current and started a fire in the
    ceiling, probably idue to a bad connection, rodents, junction box, etc.
    Thanks for your reply. Paul
    --
    cogito ergo sum


    "Jack E Martinelli" wrote:

    > While I think it rather unlikely that the laptop was placed at the suspected
    > ignition location, "between the ceiling and the attic", while being
    > charged, I do think any wiring there could have been gnawed by rodents,
    > damaged by unobservant attic users, or roofers, etc, initiating a fire.
    >
    > --
    > Jack E. Martinelli 2002-05 MS MVP for Shell/User / DTS
    > Help us help you: http://www.dts-L.org/goodpost.htm
    > In Memorium: Alex Nichol
    > http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/meetexperts/nichol.mspx
    > Your cooperation is very appreciated.
    > ------
    > "David H. Lipman" <DLipman~nospam~@Verizon.Net> wrote in message
    > news:%23eYO66RcFHA.3040@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
    > > From: "PAT (Paul)" <PATPaul@discussions.microsoft.com>
    > >
    > > | Has anyone heard of a laptop being charged and causing a major fire due
    > to a
    > > | short. Thats what I understand happened to my next door neighbour. His
    > extra
    > > | bedroom on the second floor is turned into an office, and he forgot
    > about it.
    > > | I dont know too many details but apparently the fire started between
    > the
    > > | ceiling and the attic...I've never heard of such a thing, you??
    > > |
    > > | --
    > > | cogito ergo sum
    > >
    > > Dell had a recall of notebook power supplies in 2004 indicating they were
    > faulty and could
    > > cause a fire.
    > >
    > > http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/prerel/prhtml05/05004.html
    > >
    > > --
    > > Dave
    > > http://www.claymania.com/removal-trojan-adware.html
    > > http://www.ik-cs.com/got-a-virus.htm
    > >
    > >
    >
    >
    >
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsme.general (More info?)

    Thank you for your further explanation.
    You didn't mention how old the house is. Any modern house, i.e., built
    after 1950 in the USA, would have 20 amp-capable wiring. This is far
    greater than would be drawn by a laptop. The question is why the house
    circuit breaker did not work properly.

    --
    Jack E. Martinelli 2002-05 MS MVP for Shell/User / DTS
    Help us help you: http://www.dts-L.org/goodpost.htm
    In Memorium: Alex Nichol
    http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/meetexperts/nichol.mspx
    Your cooperation is very appreciated.
    ------
    "PAT (Paul)" <PATPaul@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:3EACDB2E-565F-4A03-9932-B7B236B25A2A@microsoft.com...
    > Jack
    > No, the laptop was not actually physically put in the ceiling, but the
    wall
    > plug wiring routing is probably through the ceiling, this is almost
    standard
    > practice in order to feed other plugs, ceiling lights, etc. My thinking
    is
    > that the overheating drew too much current and started a fire in the
    > ceiling, probably idue to a bad connection, rodents, junction box, etc.
    > Thanks for your reply. Paul
    > --
    > cogito ergo sum
    >
    >
    > "Jack E Martinelli" wrote:
    >
    > > While I think it rather unlikely that the laptop was placed at the
    suspected
    > > ignition location, "between the ceiling and the attic", while being
    > > charged, I do think any wiring there could have been gnawed by rodents,
    > > damaged by unobservant attic users, or roofers, etc, initiating a fire.
    > >
    > > --
    > > Jack E. Martinelli 2002-05 MS MVP for Shell/User / DTS
    > > Help us help you: http://www.dts-L.org/goodpost.htm
    > > In Memorium: Alex Nichol
    > > http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/meetexperts/nichol.mspx
    > > Your cooperation is very appreciated.
    > > ------
    > > "David H. Lipman" <DLipman~nospam~@Verizon.Net> wrote in message
    > > news:%23eYO66RcFHA.3040@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
    > > > From: "PAT (Paul)" <PATPaul@discussions.microsoft.com>
    > > >
    > > > | Has anyone heard of a laptop being charged and causing a major fire
    due
    > > to a
    > > > | short. Thats what I understand happened to my next door neighbour.
    His
    > > extra
    > > > | bedroom on the second floor is turned into an office, and he forgot
    > > about it.
    > > > | I dont know too many details but apparently the fire started
    between
    > > the
    > > > | ceiling and the attic...I've never heard of such a thing, you??
    > > > |
    > > > | --
    > > > | cogito ergo sum
    > > >
    > > > Dell had a recall of notebook power supplies in 2004 indicating they
    were
    > > faulty and could
    > > > cause a fire.
    > > >
    > > > http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/prerel/prhtml05/05004.html
    > > >
    > > > --
    > > > Dave
    > > > http://www.claymania.com/removal-trojan-adware.html
    > > > http://www.ik-cs.com/got-a-virus.htm
    > > >
    > > >
    > >
    > >
    > >
  6. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsme.general (More info?)

    In the UK, ALL power plugs connecting the flexible cable to domestic devices
    are required to have an integral fuse, rated at such a value as to protect
    the flexible power cable from causing fire in the event of any overload
    within the device. Oddly, not even rated to protect the device itself!

    If your conclusion "that the overheating drew too much current and started a
    fire in the ceiling, probably idue to a bad connection, rodents, junction
    box, etc." is correct, then my 'guess' is that the fire was not *caused* by
    a 'faulty' charger, but rather by faulty, underrated, overloaded or badly
    designed, house wiring. I would also guess that laptop manufacturer would
    not be held liable and it was pure coincidence that the laptop charger was
    connected. It could have happened with any other device of a similar power
    consumption, being connected.

    The laptop - not the house wiring - appears to have got the bad name.

    Mart


    "PAT (Paul)" <PATPaul@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:3EACDB2E-565F-4A03-9932-B7B236B25A2A@microsoft.com...
    > Jack
    > No, the laptop was not actually physically put in the ceiling, but the
    > wall
    > plug wiring routing is probably through the ceiling, this is almost
    > standard
    > practice in order to feed other plugs, ceiling lights, etc. My thinking
    > is
    > that the overheating drew too much current and started a fire in the
    > ceiling, probably idue to a bad connection, rodents, junction box, etc.
    > Thanks for your reply. Paul
    > --
    > cogito ergo sum
    >
    >
    > "Jack E Martinelli" wrote:
    >
    >> While I think it rather unlikely that the laptop was placed at the
    >> suspected
    >> ignition location, "between the ceiling and the attic", while being
    >> charged, I do think any wiring there could have been gnawed by rodents,
    >> damaged by unobservant attic users, or roofers, etc, initiating a fire.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Jack E. Martinelli 2002-05 MS MVP for Shell/User / DTS
    >> Help us help you: http://www.dts-L.org/goodpost.htm
    >> In Memorium: Alex Nichol
    >> http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/meetexperts/nichol.mspx
    >> Your cooperation is very appreciated.
    >> ------
    >> "David H. Lipman" <DLipman~nospam~@Verizon.Net> wrote in message
    >> news:%23eYO66RcFHA.3040@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
    >> > From: "PAT (Paul)" <PATPaul@discussions.microsoft.com>
    >> >
    >> > | Has anyone heard of a laptop being charged and causing a major fire
    >> > due
    >> to a
    >> > | short. Thats what I understand happened to my next door neighbour.
    >> > His
    >> extra
    >> > | bedroom on the second floor is turned into an office, and he forgot
    >> about it.
    >> > | I dont know too many details but apparently the fire started between
    >> the
    >> > | ceiling and the attic...I've never heard of such a thing, you??
    >> > |
    >> > | --
    >> > | cogito ergo sum
    >> >
    >> > Dell had a recall of notebook power supplies in 2004 indicating they
    >> > were
    >> faulty and could
    >> > cause a fire.
    >> >
    >> > http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/prerel/prhtml05/05004.html
    >> >
    >> > --
    >> > Dave
    >> > http://www.claymania.com/removal-trojan-adware.html
    >> > http://www.ik-cs.com/got-a-virus.htm
    >> >
    >> >
    >>
    >>
    >>
  7. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsme.general (More info?)

    Perhaps I wasn't clear in my two previous posts, Mart, but I intended to
    suggest exactly as you are doing so here.
    If the ignition source had been at the site of the laptop, the conclusion of
    the cause of the fire may have been more difficult.
    Since the source of the fire is remote to the laptop and in the ceiling, a
    wire failure, as you describe, is more likely, IMO.
    Why the wire failed, and any circuit breaker not tripped, is as yet
    unexplained.
    --
    Jack E. Martinelli 2002-05 MS MVP for Shell/User / DTS
    Help us help you: http://www.dts-L.org/goodpost.htm
    In Memorium: Alex Nichol
    http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/meetexperts/nichol.mspx
    Your cooperation is very appreciated.
    ------
    "Mart" <mart(NoSpam)@nospam.nospam> wrote in message
    news:OF1I6accFHA.720@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
    > In the UK, ALL power plugs connecting the flexible cable to domestic
    devices
    > are required to have an integral fuse, rated at such a value as to protect
    > the flexible power cable from causing fire in the event of any overload
    > within the device. Oddly, not even rated to protect the device itself!
    >
    > If your conclusion "that the overheating drew too much current and started
    a
    > fire in the ceiling, probably idue to a bad connection, rodents,
    junction
    > box, etc." is correct, then my 'guess' is that the fire was not *caused*
    by
    > a 'faulty' charger, but rather by faulty, underrated, overloaded or badly
    > designed, house wiring. I would also guess that laptop manufacturer would
    > not be held liable and it was pure coincidence that the laptop charger was
    > connected. It could have happened with any other device of a similar power
    > consumption, being connected.
    >
    > The laptop - not the house wiring - appears to have got the bad name.
    >
    > Mart
    >
    >
    > "PAT (Paul)" <PATPaul@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > news:3EACDB2E-565F-4A03-9932-B7B236B25A2A@microsoft.com...
    > > Jack
    > > No, the laptop was not actually physically put in the ceiling, but the
    > > wall
    > > plug wiring routing is probably through the ceiling, this is almost
    > > standard
    > > practice in order to feed other plugs, ceiling lights, etc. My thinking
    > > is
    > > that the overheating drew too much current and started a fire in the
    > > ceiling, probably idue to a bad connection, rodents, junction box, etc.
    > > Thanks for your reply. Paul
    > > --
    > > cogito ergo sum
    > >
    > >
    > > "Jack E Martinelli" wrote:
    > >
    > >> While I think it rather unlikely that the laptop was placed at the
    > >> suspected
    > >> ignition location, "between the ceiling and the attic", while being
    > >> charged, I do think any wiring there could have been gnawed by rodents,
    > >> damaged by unobservant attic users, or roofers, etc, initiating a fire.
    > >>
    > >> --
    > >> Jack E. Martinelli 2002-05 MS MVP for Shell/User / DTS
    > >> Help us help you: http://www.dts-L.org/goodpost.htm
    > >> In Memorium: Alex Nichol
    > >> http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/meetexperts/nichol.mspx
    > >> Your cooperation is very appreciated.
    > >> ------
    > >> "David H. Lipman" <DLipman~nospam~@Verizon.Net> wrote in message
    > >> news:%23eYO66RcFHA.3040@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
    > >> > From: "PAT (Paul)" <PATPaul@discussions.microsoft.com>
    > >> >
    > >> > | Has anyone heard of a laptop being charged and causing a major fire
    > >> > due
    > >> to a
    > >> > | short. Thats what I understand happened to my next door neighbour.
    > >> > His
    > >> extra
    > >> > | bedroom on the second floor is turned into an office, and he forgot
    > >> about it.
    > >> > | I dont know too many details but apparently the fire started
    between
    > >> the
    > >> > | ceiling and the attic...I've never heard of such a thing, you??
    > >> > |
    > >> > | --
    > >> > | cogito ergo sum
    > >> >
    > >> > Dell had a recall of notebook power supplies in 2004 indicating they
    > >> > were
    > >> faulty and could
    > >> > cause a fire.
    > >> >
    > >> > http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/prerel/prhtml05/05004.html
    > >> >
    > >> > --
    > >> > Dave
    > >> > http://www.claymania.com/removal-trojan-adware.html
    > >> > http://www.ik-cs.com/got-a-virus.htm
    > >> >
    > >> >
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>
    >
    >
  8. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsme.general (More info?)

    Cheers, Jack - crystal! - and I did notice that your reply yesterday, was
    timed at the same as mine, so therefore consider that between us, we put the
    case for the Laptop Manufacturer, on behalf both sides of the pond.

    As I pointed out, "The laptop - not the house wiring - appears to have got
    the bad name." <g>

    Mart


    "Jack E Martinelli" <jemartin_DELETE@NO_SPAM_gis.net> wrote in message
    news:emppLiocFHA.720@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
    > Perhaps I wasn't clear in my two previous posts, Mart, but I intended to
    > suggest exactly as you are doing so here.
    > If the ignition source had been at the site of the laptop, the conclusion
    > of
    > the cause of the fire may have been more difficult.
    > Since the source of the fire is remote to the laptop and in the ceiling, a
    > wire failure, as you describe, is more likely, IMO.
    > Why the wire failed, and any circuit breaker not tripped, is as yet
    > unexplained.
    > --
    > Jack E. Martinelli 2002-05 MS MVP for Shell/User / DTS
    > Help us help you: http://www.dts-L.org/goodpost.htm
    > In Memorium: Alex Nichol
    > http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/meetexperts/nichol.mspx
    > Your cooperation is very appreciated.
    > ------
    > "Mart" <mart(NoSpam)@nospam.nospam> wrote in message
    > news:OF1I6accFHA.720@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
    >> In the UK, ALL power plugs connecting the flexible cable to domestic
    > devices
    >> are required to have an integral fuse, rated at such a value as to
    >> protect
    >> the flexible power cable from causing fire in the event of any overload
    >> within the device. Oddly, not even rated to protect the device itself!
    >>
    >> If your conclusion "that the overheating drew too much current and
    >> started
    > a
    >> fire in the ceiling, probably idue to a bad connection, rodents,
    > junction
    >> box, etc." is correct, then my 'guess' is that the fire was not *caused*
    > by
    >> a 'faulty' charger, but rather by faulty, underrated, overloaded or badly
    >> designed, house wiring. I would also guess that laptop manufacturer would
    >> not be held liable and it was pure coincidence that the laptop charger
    >> was
    >> connected. It could have happened with any other device of a similar
    >> power
    >> consumption, being connected.
    >>
    >> The laptop - not the house wiring - appears to have got the bad name.
    >>
    >> Mart
    >>
    >>
    >> "PAT (Paul)" <PATPaul@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    >> news:3EACDB2E-565F-4A03-9932-B7B236B25A2A@microsoft.com...
    >> > Jack
    >> > No, the laptop was not actually physically put in the ceiling, but the
    >> > wall
    >> > plug wiring routing is probably through the ceiling, this is almost
    >> > standard
    >> > practice in order to feed other plugs, ceiling lights, etc. My
    >> > thinking
    >> > is
    >> > that the overheating drew too much current and started a fire in the
    >> > ceiling, probably idue to a bad connection, rodents, junction box, etc.
    >> > Thanks for your reply. Paul
    >> > --
    >> > cogito ergo sum
    >> >
    >> >
    >> > "Jack E Martinelli" wrote:
    >> >
    >> >> While I think it rather unlikely that the laptop was placed at the
    >> >> suspected
    >> >> ignition location, "between the ceiling and the attic", while being
    >> >> charged, I do think any wiring there could have been gnawed by
    >> >> rodents,
    >> >> damaged by unobservant attic users, or roofers, etc, initiating a
    >> >> fire.
    >> >>
    >> >> --
    >> >> Jack E. Martinelli 2002-05 MS MVP for Shell/User / DTS
    >> >> Help us help you: http://www.dts-L.org/goodpost.htm
    >> >> In Memorium: Alex Nichol
    >> >> http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/meetexperts/nichol.mspx
    >> >> Your cooperation is very appreciated.
    >> >> ------
    >> >> "David H. Lipman" <DLipman~nospam~@Verizon.Net> wrote in message
    >> >> news:%23eYO66RcFHA.3040@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
    >> >> > From: "PAT (Paul)" <PATPaul@discussions.microsoft.com>
    >> >> >
    >> >> > | Has anyone heard of a laptop being charged and causing a major
    >> >> > fire
    >> >> > due
    >> >> to a
    >> >> > | short. Thats what I understand happened to my next door neighbour.
    >> >> > His
    >> >> extra
    >> >> > | bedroom on the second floor is turned into an office, and he
    >> >> > forgot
    >> >> about it.
    >> >> > | I dont know too many details but apparently the fire started
    > between
    >> >> the
    >> >> > | ceiling and the attic...I've never heard of such a thing, you??
    >> >> > |
    >> >> > | --
    >> >> > | cogito ergo sum
    >> >> >
    >> >> > Dell had a recall of notebook power supplies in 2004 indicating they
    >> >> > were
    >> >> faulty and could
    >> >> > cause a fire.
    >> >> >
    >> >> > http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/prerel/prhtml05/05004.html
    >> >> >
    >> >> > --
    >> >> > Dave
    >> >> > http://www.claymania.com/removal-trojan-adware.html
    >> >> > http://www.ik-cs.com/got-a-virus.htm
    >> >> >
    >> >> >
    >> >>
    >> >>
    >> >>
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
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