is there anyway to run a non IEDE drive on a new computer

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

I have an old non Eide hard drive with some info that I need. The old
computer is fried.

Fstop8
11 answers Last reply
More about iede drive computer
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "fstop8" <shape@tele-net-dot-net.no-spam.invalid> wrote in message
    news:422262d4$1_1@alt.athenanews.com...
    > I have an old non Eide hard drive with some info that I need. The old
    > computer is fried.
    >
    > Fstop8
    >

    you mean an MFM drive?
    no

    you need to pickup another old machine
  2. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    fstop8 wrote:

    > I have an old non Eide hard drive with some info that I need. The old
    > computer is fried.
    >
    > Fstop8
    >

    Exactly what kind of drive do you have?

    Is it a 1st generation IDE?

    Is it MFM?

    Is it RLL?

    What the hell is it?
  3. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    fstop8 wrote:

    > I have an old non Eide hard drive with some info that
    > I need. The old computer is fried.

    Post the model numbers of both the drive and the controller. The drive
    type is either MFM, RLL, ESDI, or SCSI, and the drive probably plugged
    into a controller card rather than directly into the motherboard. Save
    that controller card since may be almost irreplaceable, especially the
    MFM and RLL types, which usually lay down a low level format unique not
    only to the particular model card but also to the version of the BIOS
    on the card. Don't throw away the controller even if it's damaged
    since damage is typically limited to the cheap, generic buffer chips
    that any real computer technician can fix.

    I'm almost sure you'll need a motherboard with ISA slots on it, and if
    the controller is made for 16-bit ISA (has both a 62-pin connector and
    a 38-pin connector in front of it, with a notch between them) rather
    than 8-bit, the motherboard will need the ability to turn off its BIOS
    shadowing, which causes problems for those controllers because they
    possibly use some of the BIOS space for their own scratchpad RAM.
    8-bit controllers don't seem to require this, but they can be
    incompatible with the BIOSes of some 16-bit motherboards (AT, ATX, as
    opposed to XT) and SMS OMTI controllers that use a small amount of
    memory space as scratchpad. Another problem can be I/O port overlap
    with the IDE controller built into most newer motherboards; either turn
    it off in the BIOS setup, or set the controller card to uzse secondary
    I/O port addresses.
  4. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Put it in an XP computer as a slave.
    You don't say why it's fried.
    If the HD is fried then you have a bigger problem that if it's just the
    motherboard or power supply.
    How about some decent info to give you a decent answer?


    "fstop8" <shape@tele-net-dot-net.no-spam.invalid> wrote in message
    news:422262d4$1_1@alt.athenanews.com...
    > I have an old non Eide hard drive with some info that I need. The old
    > computer is fried.
    >
    > Fstop8
    >
  5. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    So what type of drive is it? SCSI, for example?

    "fstop8" <shape@tele-net-dot-net.no-spam.invalid> wrote in message
    news:422262d4$1_1@alt.athenanews.com...
    >I have an old non Eide hard drive with some info that I need. The old
    > computer is fried.
    >
    > Fstop8
    >
  6. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    The drive is a NEC -model #D3142 and the date is 1989. S/N is
    8952603630 and part # 134-500558-531. The drive is connected to an
    ISA card with the notch.
  7. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    The drive is a NEC -model #D3142 and the date is 1989. S/N is
    8952603630 and part # 134-500558-531. The drive is connected to an
    ISA card with the notch.
  8. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    The drive is a NEC -model #D3142 and the date is 1989. S/N is
    8952603630 and part # 134-500558-531. The drive is connected to an
    ISA card with the notch.
  9. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Sorry for the multiple posts- didn't get anywhere so I sent again. :o
    :o
  10. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    It is an MFM hard drive. Here is some info:
    http://www.nec.se/upload/I-notes/mfm2.pdf
    Also, here is the pinout info http://www.ctips.com/hdst506.html

    Are you sure the old data on that drive is worth retrieving? Will any modern
    operating system even be able to read it? You might be forced to connect up
    that drive to a computer of that vintage.


    "fstop8" <shape@tele-net-dot-net.no-spam.invalid> wrote in message
    news:4223df32$3_1@alt.athenanews.com...
    > Sorry for the multiple posts- didn't get anywhere so I sent again. :o
    > :o
    >
  11. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    fstop8 wrote:
    > The drive is a NEC -model #D3142 and the date is 1989. S/N is
    > 8952603630 and part # 134-500558-531. The drive is connected to an
    > ISA card with the notch.
    >

    That drive is a 42 MB MFM drive. The ISA card would be the MFM
    controller. In order to access the data on the drive, you would need to
    use the original controller, or an exact duplicate. Although MFM was a
    common format, it seemed that each controller manufacturer implemented
    the specs a little different. So, it was virtually impossible to swap
    controllers and be able to access the drive without doing a low-level
    format to make the drive compatible with the new controller.

    If the data is really important, you should be able to find a used
    motherboard with an ISA slot. Perhaps you have a computer shop in town
    that would be willing to help you find a solution.
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