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Head cleaning solution.

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  • Printers
  • Epson
  • Peripherals
Last response: in Computer Peripherals
Anonymous
September 22, 2004 4:43:32 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Does anyone know what this stuff is made of?

I'm trying to resurrect an Epson 860 for a friend and don't want to
waste money buying something that may be under the kitchen sink that
would do the same thing.
--
"Trust me, I do this all the time"
Mike M

More about : head cleaning solution

Anonymous
September 22, 2004 2:00:43 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

I can't tell you what "commercial" cleaning fluid is for Epson printers,
but I can tell you the solution I use and have recommended to literally
thousands of people who have successfully used it with all Epson OEM
inks, and most dye inks. And it literally does reside principally under
you kitchen sink.

Buy any brand of ammoniated window cleaner. In North America that means
either Windex original formula (not the new types or all surface types)
or any generic "blue transparent" version but makes sure it has ammonia
in it.

In the UK, you can buy Windolene which is transparent clear original
(with ammonia). If you cannot find ammoniated window cleaner, you may
also use household NON-SUDSY ammonia and mix it one part ammonia to 9
parts water.

Once you have either the window cleaner or the diluted household
ammonia, add about 8 parts of that liquid to 2 parts of isopropyl
rubbing alcohol, either 70 or 99%, but make sure it is transparent,
clear, isopropyl containing no additives such as skin conditioners or
lanolin or other oils, or oil of wintergreen, etc.

I have tested this mix on dye, ultrachrome and durabrite inks, both wet
and dry, and it successfully dissolves all of them. I doesn't appear to
harm the head.

Some inks, Lyson makes some, have the opposite pH of normal Epson OEM
inks and most others. If the printer is using Lyson inks, be careful,
as some my clot with the use of a high pH cleaner as the one mentioned.

If you would like a basic cleaning manual for Epson printers, email me
privately and I will supply you with a copy of my copyrighted manual
free of charge.

Art


Mike M wrote:

> Does anyone know what this stuff is made of?
>
> I'm trying to resurrect an Epson 860 for a friend and don't want to
> waste money buying something that may be under the kitchen sink that
> would do the same thing.
October 2, 2004 7:31:21 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Arthur Entlich wrote:
(snip)
> Once you have either the window cleaner or the diluted household
> ammonia, add about 8 parts of that liquid to 2 parts of isopropyl
> rubbing alcohol, either 70 or 99%, but make sure it is transparent,
> clear, isopropyl containing no additives such as skin conditioners or
> lanolin or other oils, or oil of wintergreen, etc.
(snip)

Ummm ... "rubbing alcohol" contains oil.
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Anonymous
October 2, 2004 9:15:56 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

On Sat, 02 Oct 2004 15:31:21 GMT, Michael <NoSpam@att.net> wrote:

>Arthur Entlich wrote:
>(snip)
>> Once you have either the window cleaner or the diluted household
>> ammonia, add about 8 parts of that liquid to 2 parts of isopropyl
>> rubbing alcohol, either 70 or 99%, but make sure it is transparent,
>> clear, isopropyl containing no additives such as skin conditioners or
>> lanolin or other oils, or oil of wintergreen, etc.
>(snip)
>
>Ummm ... "rubbing alcohol" contains oil.

That would be "rubbing alcohol compound" or liniment. There's also a
variant made with denatured grain alcohol.

isopropyl rubbing alcohol is usually isopropanol at 70% strength cut
with distilled water. At 99% strength it's about as pure as you can
get except for lab or industrial use.


---------------------------------------------

MCheu
October 2, 2004 11:44:52 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

"Michael" <NoSpam@att.net> wrote in message
news:415EC9CB.B3C02635@att.net...
> Arthur Entlich wrote:
> (snip)
> > Once you have either the window cleaner or the diluted household
> > ammonia, add about 8 parts of that liquid to 2 parts of isopropyl
> > rubbing alcohol, either 70 or 99%, but make sure it is transparent,
> > clear, isopropyl containing no additives such as skin conditioners or
> > lanolin or other oils, or oil of wintergreen, etc.
> (snip)
>
> Ummm ... "rubbing alcohol" contains oil.
????
Green Cross Isopropyl Alcohol. Formulation - 40% Isopropyl Alcohol from
Manning Impex Ltd.
Hampshire UK.
Tony
--
Inkylink JetTec UK Quality - Wot others wanna-be
Epson C64/ C84 Lighfast pigmented inks. R200/300,
RX500 (all with 30% more free patent chip)
Canon BCI-3 i560 i750 BCI-6 i865 S-820 / S-900 series.
Specialist ink refill kits... http://www.inkylink.co.uk
Anonymous
October 4, 2004 7:44:52 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

You make a reasonable point. The manual goes into much more detail
about this, and I skipped some steps here (always dangerous).

What often is referred to as "rubbing alcohol" is simply pure isopropyl.
But you are correct some products labeled as rubbing alcohol can
contain lanolin or other oils or greases or even oil of wintergreen and
should not be used.

To be more accurate, people should use only pure isopropyl alcohol
(either 99% or 70% with only water added) to be sure there are no other
additives that may contaminate the cleaning fluid.

Art



Michael wrote:

> Arthur Entlich wrote:
> (snip)
>
>>Once you have either the window cleaner or the diluted household
>>ammonia, add about 8 parts of that liquid to 2 parts of isopropyl
>>rubbing alcohol, either 70 or 99%, but make sure it is transparent,
>>clear, isopropyl containing no additives such as skin conditioners or
>>lanolin or other oils, or oil of wintergreen, etc.
>
> (snip)
>
> Ummm ... "rubbing alcohol" contains oil.
October 6, 2009 2:45:21 AM

Quote:
Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

I can't tell you what "commercial" cleaning fluid is for Epson printers,
but I can tell you the solution I use and have recommended to literally
thousands of people who have successfully used it with all Epson OEM
inks, and most dye inks. And it literally does reside principally under
you kitchen sink.

Buy any brand of ammoniated window cleaner. In North America that means
either Windex original formula (not the new types or all surface types)
or any generic "blue transparent" version but makes sure it has ammonia
in it.

In the UK, you can buy Windolene which is transparent clear original
(with ammonia). If you cannot find ammoniated window cleaner, you may
also use household NON-SUDSY ammonia and mix it one part ammonia to 9
parts water.

Once you have either the window cleaner or the diluted household
ammonia, add about 8 parts of that liquid to 2 parts of isopropyl
rubbing alcohol, either 70 or 99%, but make sure it is transparent,
clear, isopropyl containing no additives such as skin conditioners or
lanolin or other oils, or oil of wintergreen, etc.

I have tested this mix on dye, ultrachrome and durabrite inks, both wet
and dry, and it successfully dissolves all of them. I doesn't appear to
harm the head.

Some inks, Lyson makes some, have the opposite pH of normal Epson OEM
inks and most others. If the printer is using Lyson inks, be careful,
as some my clot with the use of a high pH cleaner as the one mentioned.

If you would like a basic cleaning manual for Epson printers, email me
privately and I will supply you with a copy of my copyrighted manual
free of charge.

Art


Mike M wrote:

> Does anyone know what this stuff is made of?
>
> I'm trying to resurrect an Epson 860 for a friend and don't want to
> waste money buying something that may be under the kitchen sink that
> would do the same thing.

June 5, 2011 12:13:38 PM


respected sir am a photo grapher i have epson r230 printer every time i getting problem with head block please send me a copyright formullae for head cleaning please need full and oblige premstudio@yahoo.com (or) premdigitals@rediffmail.com plz plz plz sir send me.................................
September 9, 2011 11:26:21 PM

Quote:
Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

I can't tell you what "commercial" cleaning fluid is for Epson printers,
but I can tell you the solution I use and have recommended to literally
thousands of people who have successfully used it with all Epson OEM
inks, and most dye inks. And it literally does reside principally under
you kitchen sink.

Buy any brand of ammoniated window cleaner. In North America that means
either Windex original formula (not the new types or all surface types)
or any generic "blue transparent" version but makes sure it has ammonia
in it.

In the UK, you can buy Windolene which is transparent clear original
(with ammonia). If you cannot find ammoniated window cleaner, you may
also use household NON-SUDSY ammonia and mix it one part ammonia to 9
parts water.

Once you have either the window cleaner or the diluted household
ammonia, add about 8 parts of that liquid to 2 parts of isopropyl
rubbing alcohol, either 70 or 99%, but make sure it is transparent,
clear, isopropyl containing no additives such as skin conditioners or
lanolin or other oils, or oil of wintergreen, etc.

I have tested this mix on dye, ultrachrome and durabrite inks, both wet
and dry, and it successfully dissolves all of them. I doesn't appear to
harm the head.

Some inks, Lyson makes some, have the opposite pH of normal Epson OEM
inks and most others. If the printer is using Lyson inks, be careful,
as some my clot with the use of a high pH cleaner as the one mentioned.

If you would like a basic cleaning manual for Epson printers, email me
privately and I will supply you with a copy of my copyrighted manual
free of charge.

Art


Mike M wrote:

> Does anyone know what this stuff is made of?
>
> I'm trying to resurrect an Epson 860 for a friend and don't want to
> waste money buying something that may be under the kitchen sink that
> would do the same thing.


Jerry C wrote.

I know this is an old thread, but I have a new problem. As for the alcohol, would denatured alcohol work? Yes, I would like to have a copy of your manual. I hope you get this, because I'm high centered with this printer
December 14, 2011 12:40:03 PM

Quote:
Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

I can't tell you what "commercial" cleaning fluid is for Epson printers,
but I can tell you the solution I use and have recommended to literally
thousands of people who have successfully used it with all Epson OEM
inks, and most dye inks. And it literally does reside principally under
you kitchen sink.

Buy any brand of ammoniated window cleaner. In North America that means
either Windex original formula (not the new types or all surface types)
or any generic "blue transparent" version but makes sure it has ammonia
in it.

In the UK, you can buy Windolene which is transparent clear original
(with ammonia). If you cannot find ammoniated window cleaner, you may
also use household NON-SUDSY ammonia and mix it one part ammonia to 9
parts water.

Once you have either the window cleaner or the diluted household
ammonia, add about 8 parts of that liquid to 2 parts of isopropyl
rubbing alcohol, either 70 or 99%, but make sure it is transparent,
clear, isopropyl containing no additives such as skin conditioners or
lanolin or other oils, or oil of wintergreen, etc.

I have tested this mix on dye, ultrachrome and durabrite inks, both wet
and dry, and it successfully dissolves all of them. I doesn't appear to
harm the head.

Some inks, Lyson makes some, have the opposite pH of normal Epson OEM
inks and most others. If the printer is using Lyson inks, be careful,
as some my clot with the use of a high pH cleaner as the one mentioned.

If you would like a basic cleaning manual for Epson printers, email me
privately and I will supply you with a copy of my copyrighted manual
free of charge.

Art


Mike M wrote:

> Does anyone know what this stuff is made of?
>
> I'm trying to resurrect an Epson 860 for a friend and don't want to
> waste money buying something that may be under the kitchen sink that
> would do the same thing.

send information for basic cleaning manual for epson printers to this id sbhavik52@yahoo.com
January 28, 2012 3:15:55 PM

i used tissue with warm water and I put the cartridge on it :) 
February 8, 2012 10:31:41 PM

I'd really appreciate a copy of your cleaning instructions! Please send to debradpr@comcast.net Thanks!!!
February 16, 2012 11:27:58 PM

warm water! All ink is water soluable. place printhead on wet paper towel, let the ink wick out.
April 13, 2012 8:37:14 PM

Hi,

I apologise if this email comes a few years too late and you've moved on to more contemporary interests.

From my point of view, I have a hardly-used Epson CX5400 that has a clogged black cartridge (I guess that's what it is as it produces blank documents). Before I give up on the printer I would like to try to unblock the problem so your suggestion appealed. In the UK there have been a few alterations to the composition of various products, including perhaps Windolene. In the meantime new products have been introduced which possess the right combination of glycol ether and isopropanol. I am about to go out and obtain a carton of one of them.

My technical appreciation of the CX5400 is nlittle more than inadequate so if you could let me have a copy of your manual it would be most helpful.

Thank you.

Regards

Gordon Irons


Quote:
Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

I can't tell you what "commercial" cleaning fluid is for Epson printers,
but I can tell you the solution I use and have recommended to literally
thousands of people who have successfully used it with all Epson OEM
inks, and most dye inks. And it literally does reside principally under
you kitchen sink.

Buy any brand of ammoniated window cleaner. In North America that means
either Windex original formula (not the new types or all surface types)
or any generic "blue transparent" version but makes sure it has ammonia
in it.

In the UK, you can buy Windolene which is transparent clear original
(with ammonia). If you cannot find ammoniated window cleaner, you may
also use household NON-SUDSY ammonia and mix it one part ammonia to 9
parts water.

Once you have either the window cleaner or the diluted household
ammonia, add about 8 parts of that liquid to 2 parts of isopropyl
rubbing alcohol, either 70 or 99%, but make sure it is transparent,
clear, isopropyl containing no additives such as skin conditioners or
lanolin or other oils, or oil of wintergreen, etc.

I have tested this mix on dye, ultrachrome and durabrite inks, both wet
and dry, and it successfully dissolves all of them. I doesn't appear to
harm the head.

Some inks, Lyson makes some, have the opposite pH of normal Epson OEM
inks and most others. If the printer is using Lyson inks, be careful,
as some my clot with the use of a high pH cleaner as the one mentioned.

If you would like a basic cleaning manual for Epson printers, email me
privately and I will supply you with a copy of my copyrighted manual
free of charge.

Art


Mike M wrote:

> Does anyone know what this stuff is made of?
>
> I'm trying to resurrect an Epson 860 for a friend and don't want to
> waste money buying something that may be under the kitchen sink that
> would do the same thing.

July 10, 2012 6:30:48 PM

Please sir can you send me your cleaning manual at the johnnash0188@gmail.com i am very thankful to you.I am using epson ink jet pritnter and my prinitig heads are chocked and i want your help please help me sir.
johnnash0188@gmail.com
John nash
September 28, 2012 11:14:48 AM

Well, Windex original formula blue tinted is carp !!! It reacts with 99% alcohol to form blue sticky deposit that completely clogged the print heads 100% forever!!!! The stick deposit is REALLY sticky so forget about the printheads after this operation. :fou: 

Careful people - don't use Windex !

M

Quote:
Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

I can't tell you what "commercial" cleaning fluid is for Epson printers,
but I can tell you the solution I use and have recommended to literally
thousands of people who have successfully used it with all Epson OEM
inks, and most dye inks. And it literally does reside principally under
you kitchen sink.

Buy any brand of ammoniated window cleaner. In North America that means
either Windex original formula (not the new types or all surface types)
or any generic "blue transparent" version but makes sure it has ammonia
in it.

In the UK, you can buy Windolene which is transparent clear original
(with ammonia). If you cannot find ammoniated window cleaner, you may
also use household NON-SUDSY ammonia and mix it one part ammonia to 9
parts water.

Once you have either the window cleaner or the diluted household
ammonia, add about 8 parts of that liquid to 2 parts of isopropyl
rubbing alcohol, either 70 or 99%, but make sure it is transparent,
clear, isopropyl containing no additives such as skin conditioners or
lanolin or other oils, or oil of wintergreen, etc.

I have tested this mix on dye, ultrachrome and durabrite inks, both wet
and dry, and it successfully dissolves all of them. I doesn't appear to
harm the head.

Some inks, Lyson makes some, have the opposite pH of normal Epson OEM
inks and most others. If the printer is using Lyson inks, be careful,
as some my clot with the use of a high pH cleaner as the one mentioned.

If you would like a basic cleaning manual for Epson printers, email me
privately and I will supply you with a copy of my copyrighted manual
free of charge.

Art


Mike M wrote:

> Does anyone know what this stuff is made of?
>
> I'm trying to resurrect an Epson 860 for a friend and don't want to
> waste money buying something that may be under the kitchen sink that
> would do the same thing.

November 11, 2012 7:47:57 PM

Quote:
Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

I can't tell you what "commercial" cleaning fluid is for Epson printers,
but I can tell you the solution I use and have recommended to literally
thousands of people who have successfully used it with all Epson OEM
inks, and most dye inks. And it literally does reside principally under
you kitchen sink.

Buy any brand of ammoniated window cleaner. In North America that means
either Windex original formula (not the new types or all surface types)
or any generic "blue transparent" version but makes sure it has ammonia
in it.

In the UK, you can buy Windolene which is transparent clear original
(with ammonia). If you cannot find ammoniated window cleaner, you may
also use household NON-SUDSY ammonia and mix it one part ammonia to 9
parts water.

Once you have either the window cleaner or the diluted household
ammonia, add about 8 parts of that liquid to 2 parts of isopropyl
rubbing alcohol, either 70 or 99%, but make sure it is transparent,
clear, isopropyl containing no additives such as skin conditioners or
lanolin or other oils, or oil of wintergreen, etc.

I have tested this mix on dye, ultrachrome and durabrite inks, both wet
and dry, and it successfully dissolves all of them. I doesn't appear to
harm the head.

Some inks, Lyson makes some, have the opposite pH of normal Epson OEM
inks and most others. If the printer is using Lyson inks, be careful,
as some my clot with the use of a high pH cleaner as the one mentioned.

If you would like a basic cleaning manual for Epson printers, email me
privately and I will supply you with a copy of my copyrighted manual
free of charge.

Art


Mike M wrote:

> Does anyone know what this stuff is made of?
>
> I'm trying to resurrect an Epson 860 for a friend and don't want to
> waste money buying something that may be under the kitchen sink that
> would do the same thing.


Just to say I was about to junk my new WorkForce 7520 printer because of a clogged black ink head. The windex and alcohol mixture work! I selected cartridge replacement, then when the print heads were in position I unplugged the printer so that I could move the print head and places a folded piece of paper towel under the print head. I removed the black cartage but did not have a tube for the syringe so I used an ear wax remover bulb from the drug store and it was perfect for attaching to the printer "pipe" that sticks into the cartridge from the print head. Thanks!
September 12, 2013 4:59:44 AM

Anonymous said:
Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

I can't tell you what "commercial" cleaning fluid is for Epson printers,
but I can tell you the solution I use and have recommended to literally
thousands of people who have successfully used it with all Epson OEM
inks, and most dye inks. And it literally does reside principally under
you kitchen sink.

Buy any brand of ammoniated window cleaner. In North America that means
either Windex original formula (not the new types or all surface types)
or any generic "blue transparent" version but makes sure it has ammonia
in it.

In the UK, you can buy Windolene which is transparent clear original
(with ammonia). If you cannot find ammoniated window cleaner, you may
also use household NON-SUDSY ammonia and mix it one part ammonia to 9
parts water.

Once you have either the window cleaner or the diluted household
ammonia, add about 8 parts of that liquid to 2 parts of isopropyl
rubbing alcohol, either 70 or 99%, but make sure it is transparent,
clear, isopropyl containing no additives such as skin conditioners or
lanolin or other oils, or oil of wintergreen, etc.

I have tested this mix on dye, ultrachrome and durabrite inks, both wet
and dry, and it successfully dissolves all of them. I doesn't appear to
harm the head.

Some inks, Lyson makes some, have the opposite pH of normal Epson OEM
inks and most others. If the printer is using Lyson inks, be careful,
as some my clot with the use of a high pH cleaner as the one mentioned.

If you would like a basic cleaning manual for Epson printers, email me
privately and I will supply you with a copy of my copyrighted manual
free of charge.

Art


Mike M wrote:

> Does anyone know what this stuff is made of?
>
> I'm trying to resurrect an Epson 860 for a friend and don't want to
> waste money buying something that may be under the kitchen sink that
> would do the same thing.


Hi
Could you please send me a copy of the copyrighted manual, i realy need help ;(
December 27, 2013 10:55:22 AM

HI

I am trying to do this for an Epson 3800 Pro. I have seen similar posts recommending a paper towel folder into a ribbon shape (about 1" wide by 6-8' long and soaking that with Windex or the Ammonia / Alcohol l/Distilled water solution and placing it under the print area the print head travels. (Also using the trick of pulling the plus when the print head moves described above to move the head in order to place the folded towel.

FOr me this has not yet cleared the ink clog. The post above sounds like some are feeding the cleaning solution into the print head via an ink access tube. Would this work for a 3800??

Any other ideas besides what I am doing? Would it be crazy to buy refillable ink cartridges and fill with cleaning solution and set ptinter to print mode?

Thanks