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Anonymous
August 21, 2005 11:19:02 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsme.general (More info?)

Desperate for your help,

We purchased a Compaq Presario in March of 2001. It had Windows ME
preloaded onto it, and we purchased a separate MS Office Suite 2000 to
complement the new system.

We began to rely on the system with legal documents, business account
information, electronic banking, imaging & photos, engineering& financial
spreadsheets, and CAD applications. We had good luck with it all for the
first couple years or so and then the system’s performance began to go
straight down the toilet! The system began to slow down and progressively
got worse. Then various error messages cropped up and working with the
Internet applications became interminable. Finally, in November of 2004 it
became so bad that we paid a third party to help us out of the difficulties
that we were having. After that, the system worked better but was still not
as reliable as it was originally. The third party advised us that our RAM
BIOS was only 128 MB, and the image and CAD applications we were using could
be the culprit of the slowdown. So we extended our RAM BIOS from the
factory’s 128 MB to 512 MB which again seemed to help, but only for a few
weeks. The slowdown began anew and other problems cropped up. We have heard
it blamed on the HP “all-in-one� unit, the newer BIOS we installed, and
mostly the Windows ME operating system.

Since the folks that we knew were reliable individuals and all of them
agreed about the ME OS, we have purchased a Windows XP OS to replace the ME
OS, with the plan that we would back up all of our files to a removable
drive, reformat the hard drive to eliminate any remnants of the ME OS, and
install the XP (ME has caused us enough heartache that we would rather it be
gone altogether). McAfee Security Suite 7.0 finda no viruses that could be
causing these problems, and Ad-Aware usage does not improve anything.

Now we notice that the XP package is labeled as an upgrade rather than a
replacement OS, and that our Office 2000 does not even mention compatibility
with the XP system. While we both are not exactly the dullest knives in the
drawer, we do not understand these complexities and inter-relationships well
enough to come up with our own plan.

What in tarnation do we do now?
Should we use the XP as an upgrade to the ME OS, or wipe out the ME OS as
originally planned?
Will the Office 2000 be compatible with XP?

Info that may help anyone properly advise us what to do:
We subscribe to McAfee Security Suite and have recently upgraded to v 7.0
· Machine: Compaq Presario 5003US w/ MV940 Monitor. We have a CD-ROM, CD-RW
and 3-1/2� floppy.
· CPU: Intel Pentium III, 930 MHz
· Video Memory: 11 MB
· Advertised 60 GB Hard Drive with the following current memory stats from
‘System Summary’:
o Total physical memory – 510.51 MB
o Available physical memory – 3.14 MB
o Total virtual memory – 2.00 GB
o Available virtual memory – 1.32 GB
o Page file space – 1.50 GB
· HSP56 MicroModem 56K Modem
· We use a dial up ISP
· We have 2 CAD applications: AutoCAD v14 & Cadkey 97
· We have approximately 6 imaging applications
o 1 for Polaroid digital camera
o 1 for HP PSC 2410 all-in-one printer/scanner/fax/copier

Any other information that may be needed can be supplied to help diagnose
etc if e-mailed to us at jomobe@yahoo.com.

Thanks(?)

Cc:
Compaq
MicroSoft

More about : upgrade wipe

Anonymous
August 21, 2005 4:05:07 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsme.general (More info?)

Under no circumstances should you install XP simply on top of your
existing WinME system. Among other technical considerations, you will
most probably be moving your problems onto the new OS.

Since you've already purchased an XP-Upgrade, I'd suggest contacting HP
to find out how to install it using your Compaq Windows Millenium CD as
"proof of previous OS" that the Upgrade Installer will require. You may
find that you cannot do so legally (I don't know what Microsoft's
contracts with HP/Compaq are/were), or you may find that they have an XP
Upgrade or Full Install media already available for your machine.

Regardless of whether you choose to go to XP or continue with WinME,
back up your proprietary data, wipe the OS partition and install fresh;
install Norton/McAffee last.

On the hardware side you should at the very least allocate more on-board
video-memory from the system BIOS (I'd recommend 64MB); this is a
freebie, and consider getting a discrete graphics card if your mainboard
has an AGP slot: Matrox are the best for 2D work; if you require heavy
GL support, then ATI's FireGL series.


Rick

Of course since you're running CAD apps you could always purchase one of
their Alpha-based workstations running Unix. :) 



lindab wrote:
> Desperate for your help,
>
> We purchased a Compaq Presario in March of 2001. It had Windows ME
> preloaded onto it, and we purchased a separate MS Office Suite 2000 to
> complement the new system.
>
> We began to rely on the system with legal documents, business account
> information, electronic banking, imaging & photos, engineering& financial
> spreadsheets, and CAD applications. We had good luck with it all for the
> first couple years or so and then the system’s performance began to go
> straight down the toilet! The system began to slow down and progressively
> got worse. Then various error messages cropped up and working with the
> Internet applications became interminable. Finally, in November of 2004 it
> became so bad that we paid a third party to help us out of the difficulties
> that we were having. After that, the system worked better but was still not
> as reliable as it was originally. The third party advised us that our RAM
> BIOS was only 128 MB, and the image and CAD applications we were using could
> be the culprit of the slowdown. So we extended our RAM BIOS from the
> factory’s 128 MB to 512 MB which again seemed to help, but only for a few
> weeks. The slowdown began anew and other problems cropped up. We have heard
> it blamed on the HP “all-in-one” unit, the newer BIOS we installed, and
> mostly the Windows ME operating system.
>
> Since the folks that we knew were reliable individuals and all of them
> agreed about the ME OS, we have purchased a Windows XP OS to replace the ME
> OS, with the plan that we would back up all of our files to a removable
> drive, reformat the hard drive to eliminate any remnants of the ME OS, and
> install the XP (ME has caused us enough heartache that we would rather it be
> gone altogether). McAfee Security Suite 7.0 finda no viruses that could be
> causing these problems, and Ad-Aware usage does not improve anything.
>
> Now we notice that the XP package is labeled as an upgrade rather than a
> replacement OS, and that our Office 2000 does not even mention compatibility
> with the XP system. While we both are not exactly the dullest knives in the
> drawer, we do not understand these complexities and inter-relationships well
> enough to come up with our own plan.
>
> What in tarnation do we do now?
> Should we use the XP as an upgrade to the ME OS, or wipe out the ME OS as
> originally planned?
> Will the Office 2000 be compatible with XP?
>
> Info that may help anyone properly advise us what to do:
> We subscribe to McAfee Security Suite and have recently upgraded to v 7.0
> · Machine: Compaq Presario 5003US w/ MV940 Monitor. We have a CD-ROM, CD-RW
> and 3-1/2” floppy.
> · CPU: Intel Pentium III, 930 MHz
> · Video Memory: 11 MB
> · Advertised 60 GB Hard Drive with the following current memory stats from
> ‘System Summary’:
> o Total physical memory – 510.51 MB
> o Available physical memory – 3.14 MB
> o Total virtual memory – 2.00 GB
> o Available virtual memory – 1.32 GB
> o Page file space – 1.50 GB
> · HSP56 MicroModem 56K Modem
> · We use a dial up ISP
> · We have 2 CAD applications: AutoCAD v14 & Cadkey 97
> · We have approximately 6 imaging applications
> o 1 for Polaroid digital camera
> o 1 for HP PSC 2410 all-in-one printer/scanner/fax/copier
>
> Any other information that may be needed can be supplied to help diagnose
> etc if e-mailed to us at jomobe@yahoo.com.
>
> Thanks(?)
>
> Cc:
> Compaq
> MicroSoft
>
>
>
>
Anonymous
August 21, 2005 7:47:48 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsme.general (More info?)

I can answer one of your queries, Office 2000 will run on XP, I use it on
my system.
I will let the experts answer with regards running XP on your machine.
Joan


lindab wrote:
> Desperate for your help,
>
> We purchased a Compaq Presario in March of 2001. It had Windows ME
> preloaded onto it, and we purchased a separate MS Office Suite 2000 to
> complement the new system.
>
> We began to rely on the system with legal documents, business account
> information, electronic banking, imaging & photos, engineering&
> financial spreadsheets, and CAD applications. We had good luck with
> it all for the first couple years or so and then the system's
> performance began to go straight down the toilet! The system began
> to slow down and progressively got worse. Then various error messages
> cropped up and working with the Internet applications became
> interminable. Finally, in November of 2004 it became so bad that we
> paid a third party to help us out of the difficulties that we were
> having. After that, the system worked better but was still not as
> reliable as it was originally. The third party advised us that our
> RAM BIOS was only 128 MB, and the image and CAD applications we were
> using could be the culprit of the slowdown. So we extended our RAM
> BIOS from the factory's 128 MB to 512 MB which again seemed to help,
> but only for a few weeks. The slowdown began anew and other problems
> cropped up. We have heard it blamed on the HP "all-in-one" unit, the
> newer BIOS we installed, and mostly the Windows ME operating system.
>
> Since the folks that we knew were reliable individuals and all of them
> agreed about the ME OS, we have purchased a Windows XP OS to replace
> the ME OS, with the plan that we would back up all of our files to a
> removable drive, reformat the hard drive to eliminate any remnants of
> the ME OS, and install the XP (ME has caused us enough heartache that
> we would rather it be gone altogether). McAfee Security Suite 7.0
> finda no viruses that could be causing these problems, and Ad-Aware
> usage does not improve anything.
>
> Now we notice that the XP package is labeled as an upgrade rather
> than a replacement OS, and that our Office 2000 does not even mention
> compatibility with the XP system. While we both are not exactly the
> dullest knives in the drawer, we do not understand these complexities
> and inter-relationships well enough to come up with our own plan.
>
> What in tarnation do we do now?
> Should we use the XP as an upgrade to the ME OS, or wipe out the ME
> OS as originally planned?
> Will the Office 2000 be compatible with XP?
>
> Info that may help anyone properly advise us what to do:
> We subscribe to McAfee Security Suite and have recently upgraded to v
> 7.0
> · Machine: Compaq Presario 5003US w/ MV940 Monitor. We have a
> CD-ROM, CD-RW and 3-1/2" floppy.
> · CPU: Intel Pentium III, 930 MHz
> · Video Memory: 11 MB
> · Advertised 60 GB Hard Drive with the following current memory stats
> from 'System Summary':
> o Total physical memory - 510.51 MB
> o Available physical memory - 3.14 MB
> o Total virtual memory - 2.00 GB
> o Available virtual memory - 1.32 GB
> o Page file space - 1.50 GB
> · HSP56 MicroModem 56K Modem
> · We use a dial up ISP
> · We have 2 CAD applications: AutoCAD v14 & Cadkey 97
> · We have approximately 6 imaging applications
> o 1 for Polaroid digital camera
> o 1 for HP PSC 2410 all-in-one printer/scanner/fax/copier
>
> Any other information that may be needed can be supplied to help
> diagnose etc if e-mailed to us at jomobe@yahoo.com.
>
> Thanks(?)
>
> Cc:
> Compaq
> MicroSoft
Related resources
Anonymous
August 21, 2005 8:13:15 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsme.general (More info?)

I think you can hardly blame the operating system for your problems given
your statement "We had good luck with it all for the first couple years or
so"

I suspect your problems are in part due to the entry of unwanted malware
onto the system, especially so due to your comment about working with
Internet applications becoming interminable. Prevention of such intrusion
is very much down to the operator practising "safe hex" at all times and
whilst increasing memory and moving to XP might help in the short term it
is essential that the system be fully maintained and kept patched to date
otherwise regardless of the operating system you are using you will
experience problems. XP, due to its very nature, is potentially far more
susceptible to unwanted third party intrusions so it is even more
essential than with Win Me to keep the system fully patched and protected.
Good Firewall, AV and commercial malware/adware protection are all
essential and must be continuously updated.

See http://www.microsoft.com/Office/previous/2000/sysreq200... for
system requirements for Office 2000 and you will notice that it does
mention XP. Your Office 2000 package however is unlikely to mention XP as
Office 2000 was released two years before XP.
--
Mike Maltby
mike.maltby@gmail.com


lindab <lindab@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:

> Desperate for your help,
>
> We purchased a Compaq Presario in March of 2001. It had Windows ME
> preloaded onto it, and we purchased a separate MS Office Suite 2000 to
> complement the new system.
>
> We began to rely on the system with legal documents, business account
> information, electronic banking, imaging & photos, engineering&
> financial spreadsheets, and CAD applications. We had good luck with
> it all for the first couple years or so and then the system’s
> performance began to go straight down the toilet! The system began
> to slow down and progressively got worse. Then various error messages
> cropped up and working with the Internet applications became
> interminable. Finally, in November of 2004 it became so bad that we
> paid a third party to help us out of the difficulties that we were
> having. After that, the system worked better but was still not as
> reliable as it was originally. The third party advised us that our
> RAM BIOS was only 128 MB, and the image and CAD applications we were
> using could be the culprit of the slowdown. So we extended our RAM
> BIOS from the factory’s 128 MB to 512 MB which again seemed to help,
> but only for a few weeks. The slowdown began anew and other problems
> cropped up. We have heard it blamed on the HP “all-in-one� unit, the
> newer BIOS we installed, and mostly the Windows ME operating system.
>
> Since the folks that we knew were reliable individuals and all of them
> agreed about the ME OS, we have purchased a Windows XP OS to replace
> the ME OS, with the plan that we would back up all of our files to a
> removable drive, reformat the hard drive to eliminate any remnants of
> the ME OS, and install the XP (ME has caused us enough heartache that
> we would rather it be gone altogether). McAfee Security Suite 7.0
> finda no viruses that could be causing these problems, and Ad-Aware
> usage does not improve anything.
>
> Now we notice that the XP package is labeled as an upgrade rather
> than a replacement OS, and that our Office 2000 does not even mention
> compatibility with the XP system. While we both are not exactly the
> dullest knives in the drawer, we do not understand these complexities
> and inter-relationships well enough to come up with our own plan.
>
> What in tarnation do we do now?
> Should we use the XP as an upgrade to the ME OS, or wipe out the ME
> OS as originally planned?
> Will the Office 2000 be compatible with XP?
>
> Info that may help anyone properly advise us what to do:
> We subscribe to McAfee Security Suite and have recently upgraded to v
> 7.0
> · Machine: Compaq Presario 5003US w/ MV940 Monitor. We have a
> CD-ROM, CD-RW and 3-1/2� floppy.
> · CPU: Intel Pentium III, 930 MHz
> · Video Memory: 11 MB
> · Advertised 60 GB Hard Drive with the following current memory stats
> from ‘System Summary’:
> o Total physical memory – 510.51 MB
> o Available physical memory – 3.14 MB
> o Total virtual memory – 2.00 GB
> o Available virtual memory – 1.32 GB
> o Page file space – 1.50 GB
> · HSP56 MicroModem 56K Modem
> · We use a dial up ISP
> · We have 2 CAD applications: AutoCAD v14 & Cadkey 97
> · We have approximately 6 imaging applications
> o 1 for Polaroid digital camera
> o 1 for HP PSC 2410 all-in-one printer/scanner/fax/copier
>
> Any other information that may be needed can be supplied to help
> diagnose etc if e-mailed to us at jomobe@yahoo.com.
August 21, 2005 8:53:54 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsme.general (More info?)

XP should run fine on that machine, although I would get a better video
card.

Alias

"lindab" <lindab@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote

> Desperate for your help,
>
> We purchased a Compaq Presario in March of 2001. It had Windows ME
> preloaded onto it, and we purchased a separate MS Office Suite 2000 to
> complement the new system.
>
> We began to rely on the system with legal documents, business account
> information, electronic banking, imaging & photos, engineering& financial
> spreadsheets, and CAD applications. We had good luck with it all for the
> first couple years or so and then the system’s performance began to go
> straight down the toilet! The system began to slow down and progressively
> got worse. Then various error messages cropped up and working with the
> Internet applications became interminable. Finally, in November of 2004
> it
> became so bad that we paid a third party to help us out of the
> difficulties
> that we were having. After that, the system worked better but was still
> not
> as reliable as it was originally. The third party advised us that our RAM
> BIOS was only 128 MB, and the image and CAD applications we were using
> could
> be the culprit of the slowdown. So we extended our RAM BIOS from the
> factory’s 128 MB to 512 MB which again seemed to help, but only for a
> few
> weeks. The slowdown began anew and other problems cropped up. We have
> heard
> it blamed on the HP “all-in-one� unit, the newer BIOS we installed,
> and
> mostly the Windows ME operating system.
>
> Since the folks that we knew were reliable individuals and all of them
> agreed about the ME OS, we have purchased a Windows XP OS to replace the
> ME
> OS, with the plan that we would back up all of our files to a removable
> drive, reformat the hard drive to eliminate any remnants of the ME OS, and
> install the XP (ME has caused us enough heartache that we would rather it
> be
> gone altogether). McAfee Security Suite 7.0 finda no viruses that could
> be
> causing these problems, and Ad-Aware usage does not improve anything.
>
> Now we notice that the XP package is labeled as an upgrade rather than a
> replacement OS, and that our Office 2000 does not even mention
> compatibility
> with the XP system. While we both are not exactly the dullest knives in
> the
> drawer, we do not understand these complexities and inter-relationships
> well
> enough to come up with our own plan.
>
> What in tarnation do we do now?
> Should we use the XP as an upgrade to the ME OS, or wipe out the ME OS as
> originally planned?
> Will the Office 2000 be compatible with XP?
>
> Info that may help anyone properly advise us what to do:
> We subscribe to McAfee Security Suite and have recently upgraded to v 7.0
> · Machine: Compaq Presario 5003US w/ MV940 Monitor. We have a CD-ROM,
> CD-RW
> and 3-1/2� floppy.
> · CPU: Intel Pentium III, 930 MHz
> · Video Memory: 11 MB
> · Advertised 60 GB Hard Drive with the following current memory stats
> from
> ‘System Summary’:
> o Total physical memory – 510.51 MB
> o Available physical memory – 3.14 MB
> o Total virtual memory – 2.00 GB
> o Available virtual memory – 1.32 GB
> o Page file space – 1.50 GB
> · HSP56 MicroModem 56K Modem
> · We use a dial up ISP
> · We have 2 CAD applications: AutoCAD v14 & Cadkey 97
> · We have approximately 6 imaging applications
> o 1 for Polaroid digital camera
> o 1 for HP PSC 2410 all-in-one printer/scanner/fax/copier
>
> Any other information that may be needed can be supplied to help diagnose
> etc if e-mailed to us at jomobe@yahoo.com.
>
> Thanks(?)
>
> Cc:
> Compaq
> MicroSoft
>
>
>
>
Anonymous
August 21, 2005 10:04:25 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsme.general (More info?)

It's always legal to upgrade - so long as you also keep hold of the original
disks in the case of OEM software.

If the XP won't clean-install (asking for the ME system disk along the way),
then the solution is to install ME clean using the OEM CD, and do an
immediate upgrade install of XP using the purchased CD.

--
Noel Paton (MS-MVP 2002-2005, Windows)

Nil Carborundum Illegitemi
http://www.btinternet.com/~winnoel/millsrpch.htm

http://tinyurl.com/6oztj

Please read http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm on how to post messages to NG's

"Rick T" <plinnane3REMOVE@NOSPAMyahoo.com> wrote in message
news:uISYunmpFHA.3828@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> Under no circumstances should you install XP simply on top of your
> existing WinME system. Among other technical considerations, you will
> most probably be moving your problems onto the new OS.
>
> Since you've already purchased an XP-Upgrade, I'd suggest contacting HP to
> find out how to install it using your Compaq Windows Millenium CD as
> "proof of previous OS" that the Upgrade Installer will require. You may
> find that you cannot do so legally (I don't know what Microsoft's
> contracts with HP/Compaq are/were), or you may find that they have an XP
> Upgrade or Full Install media already available for your machine.
>
> Regardless of whether you choose to go to XP or continue with WinME, back
> up your proprietary data, wipe the OS partition and install fresh; install
> Norton/McAffee last.
>
> On the hardware side you should at the very least allocate more on-board
> video-memory from the system BIOS (I'd recommend 64MB); this is a freebie,
> and consider getting a discrete graphics card if your mainboard has an AGP
> slot: Matrox are the best for 2D work; if you require heavy GL support,
> then ATI's FireGL series.
>
>
> Rick
>
> Of course since you're running CAD apps you could always purchase one of
> their Alpha-based workstations running Unix. :) 
>
>
>
> lindab wrote:
>> Desperate for your help,
>>
>> We purchased a Compaq Presario in March of 2001. It had Windows ME
>> preloaded onto it, and we purchased a separate MS Office Suite 2000 to
>> complement the new system.
>>
>> We began to rely on the system with legal documents, business account
>> information, electronic banking, imaging & photos, engineering& financial
>> spreadsheets, and CAD applications. We had good luck with it all for the
>> first couple years or so and then the system’s performance began to go
>> straight down the toilet! The system began to slow down and
>> progressively got worse. Then various error messages cropped up and
>> working with the Internet applications became interminable. Finally, in
>> November of 2004 it became so bad that we paid a third party to help us
>> out of the difficulties that we were having. After that, the system
>> worked better but was still not as reliable as it was originally. The
>> third party advised us that our RAM BIOS was only 128 MB, and the image
>> and CAD applications we were using could be the culprit of the slowdown.
>> So we extended our RAM BIOS from the factory’s 128 MB to 512 MB which
>> again seemed to help, but only for a few weeks. The slowdown began anew
>> and other problems cropped up. We have heard it blamed on the HP
>> “all-in-one” unit, the newer BIOS we installed, and mostly the Windows ME
>> operating system.
>>
>> Since the folks that we knew were reliable individuals and all of them
>> agreed about the ME OS, we have purchased a Windows XP OS to replace the
>> ME OS, with the plan that we would back up all of our files to a
>> removable drive, reformat the hard drive to eliminate any remnants of the
>> ME OS, and install the XP (ME has caused us enough heartache that we
>> would rather it be gone altogether). McAfee Security Suite 7.0 finda no
>> viruses that could be causing these problems, and Ad-Aware usage does
>> not improve anything.
>>
>> Now we notice that the XP package is labeled as an upgrade rather than a
>> replacement OS, and that our Office 2000 does not even mention
>> compatibility with the XP system. While we both are not exactly the
>> dullest knives in the drawer, we do not understand these complexities and
>> inter-relationships well enough to come up with our own plan.
>>
>> What in tarnation do we do now?
>> Should we use the XP as an upgrade to the ME OS, or wipe out the ME OS as
>> originally planned?
>> Will the Office 2000 be compatible with XP?
>>
>> Info that may help anyone properly advise us what to do:
>> We subscribe to McAfee Security Suite and have recently upgraded to v 7.0
>> · Machine: Compaq Presario 5003US w/ MV940 Monitor. We have a CD-ROM,
>> CD-RW and 3-1/2” floppy.
>> · CPU: Intel Pentium III, 930 MHz
>> · Video Memory: 11 MB
>> · Advertised 60 GB Hard Drive with the following current memory stats
>> from ‘System Summary’:
>> o Total physical memory – 510.51 MB
>> o Available physical memory – 3.14 MB
>> o Total virtual memory – 2.00 GB
>> o Available virtual memory – 1.32 GB
>> o Page file space – 1.50 GB
>> · HSP56 MicroModem 56K Modem
>> · We use a dial up ISP
>> · We have 2 CAD applications: AutoCAD v14 & Cadkey 97
>> · We have approximately 6 imaging applications
>> o 1 for Polaroid digital camera
>> o 1 for HP PSC 2410 all-in-one printer/scanner/fax/copier
>>
>> Any other information that may be needed can be supplied to help diagnose
>> etc if e-mailed to us at jomobe@yahoo.com.
>>
>> Thanks(?)
>>
>> Cc:
>> Compaq
>> MicroSoft
>>
>>
>>
Anonymous
August 21, 2005 10:18:15 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsme.general (More info?)

Noel Paton wrote:
> It's always legal to upgrade - so long as you also keep hold of the original
> disks in the case of OEM software.
>
> If the XP won't clean-install (asking for the ME system disk along the way),
> then the solution is to install ME clean using the OEM CD, and do an
> immediate upgrade install of XP using the purchased CD.
>

I remember Compaq had OS CD's that didn't get along with M$ ones back
around Win98 or so... so won't they have the 512-byte thing if they just
install NTFS on top of WinME's FAT32 ? (as well as superfluous
files/subdirectories)


Rick
Anonymous
August 22, 2005 10:45:54 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsme.general (More info?)

The XP installer gives the option to wipe the drive at the time of the
install - converting to NTFS along the way

--
Noel Paton (MS-MVP 2002-2005, Windows)

Nil Carborundum Illegitemi
http://www.btinternet.com/~winnoel/millsrpch.htm

http://tinyurl.com/6oztj

Please read http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm on how to post messages to NG's

"Rick T" <plinnane3REMOVE@NOSPAMyahoo.com> wrote in message
news:ulSJO4ppFHA.3536@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> Noel Paton wrote:
>> It's always legal to upgrade - so long as you also keep hold of the
>> original disks in the case of OEM software.
>>
>> If the XP won't clean-install (asking for the ME system disk along the
>> way), then the solution is to install ME clean using the OEM CD, and do
>> an immediate upgrade install of XP using the purchased CD.
>>
>
> I remember Compaq had OS CD's that didn't get along with M$ ones back
> around Win98 or so... so won't they have the 512-byte thing if they just
> install NTFS on top of WinME's FAT32 ? (as well as superfluous
> files/subdirectories)
>
>
> Rick
Anonymous
August 22, 2005 12:59:14 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsme.general (More info?)

So does Win 2K.

--
Walterius

"Noel Paton" <NoelDPspamless@btopenworld.com> wrote in message
news:o 1Rc%23ytpFHA.3408@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> The XP installer gives the option to wipe the drive at the time of the
> install - converting to NTFS along the way
>
> --
> Noel Paton (MS-MVP 2002-2005, Windows)
>
> Nil Carborundum Illegitemi
> http://www.btinternet.com/~winnoel/millsrpch.htm
>
> http://tinyurl.com/6oztj
>
> Please read http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm on how to post messages to NG's
>
> "Rick T" <plinnane3REMOVE@NOSPAMyahoo.com> wrote in message
> news:ulSJO4ppFHA.3536@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> > Noel Paton wrote:
> >> It's always legal to upgrade - so long as you also keep hold of the
> >> original disks in the case of OEM software.
> >>
> >> If the XP won't clean-install (asking for the ME system disk along the
> >> way), then the solution is to install ME clean using the OEM CD, and do
> >> an immediate upgrade install of XP using the purchased CD.
> >>
> >
> > I remember Compaq had OS CD's that didn't get along with M$ ones back
> > around Win98 or so... so won't they have the 512-byte thing if they just
> > install NTFS on top of WinME's FAT32 ? (as well as superfluous
> > files/subdirectories)
> >
> >
> > Rick
>
>
September 18, 2005 4:42:36 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsme.general (More info?)

A note on my experience with new graphics cards and old Compaq computers:

Mine is a DeskPro P-III 500 MHz.

1. AGP slots progress with time and technology, and they are keyed to
prevent use with incompatible cards. My AGP slot is two generations too old
to mate with a modern graphics card. And:

2. My DeskPro has a separate graphics card--an ATI, yet--but it is in no
way similar in form to a standard graphics card. So the card slot, the
connector position, and the size of the opening are all incompatible with
any graphics card you would purchase. Is the Presario any different?

I took a quick look to see if the computer had an AGP slot an went out and
spent $200 on a new graphics card at CompUSA. By the time I got around to
installing it, CompUSA's return window was long past, and only then did I
discover the above!

Joe


> > Under no circumstances should you install XP simply on top of your
> > existing WinME system. Among other technical considerations, you will
> > most probably be moving your problems onto the new OS.
> >
> > Since you've already purchased an XP-Upgrade, I'd suggest contacting HP
to
> > find out how to install it using your Compaq Windows Millenium CD as
> > "proof of previous OS" that the Upgrade Installer will require. You may
> > find that you cannot do so legally (I don't know what Microsoft's
> > contracts with HP/Compaq are/were), or you may find that they have an XP
> > Upgrade or Full Install media already available for your machine.
> >
> > Regardless of whether you choose to go to XP or continue with WinME,
back
> > up your proprietary data, wipe the OS partition and install fresh;
install
> > Norton/McAffee last.
> >
> > On the hardware side you should at the very least allocate more on-board
> > video-memory from the system BIOS (I'd recommend 64MB); this is a
freebie,
> > and consider getting a discrete graphics card if your mainboard has an
AGP
> > slot: Matrox are the best for 2D work; if you require heavy GL support,
> > then ATI's FireGL series.
> >
> >
> > Rick
> >
Anonymous
September 19, 2005 12:48:21 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsme.general (More info?)

Joe - I suspect that your graphics card may be a PCI one :( 


--
Noel Paton (MS-MVP 2002-2005, Windows)

Nil Carborundum Illegitemi
http://www.btinternet.com/~winnoel/millsrpch.htm

http://tinyurl.com/6oztj

Please read http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm on how to post messages to NG's

"Joe" <joe@ratherbeflying.invalid> wrote in message
news:iYqdnTYerdelXrDeRVn-gw@comcast.com...
>A note on my experience with new graphics cards and old Compaq computers:
>
> Mine is a DeskPro P-III 500 MHz.
>
> 1. AGP slots progress with time and technology, and they are keyed to
> prevent use with incompatible cards. My AGP slot is two generations too
> old
> to mate with a modern graphics card. And:
>
> 2. My DeskPro has a separate graphics card--an ATI, yet--but it is in no
> way similar in form to a standard graphics card. So the card slot, the
> connector position, and the size of the opening are all incompatible with
> any graphics card you would purchase. Is the Presario any different?
>
> I took a quick look to see if the computer had an AGP slot an went out and
> spent $200 on a new graphics card at CompUSA. By the time I got around to
> installing it, CompUSA's return window was long past, and only then did I
> discover the above!
>
> Joe
>
>
>> > Under no circumstances should you install XP simply on top of your
>> > existing WinME system. Among other technical considerations, you will
>> > most probably be moving your problems onto the new OS.
>> >
>> > Since you've already purchased an XP-Upgrade, I'd suggest contacting HP
> to
>> > find out how to install it using your Compaq Windows Millenium CD as
>> > "proof of previous OS" that the Upgrade Installer will require. You
>> > may
>> > find that you cannot do so legally (I don't know what Microsoft's
>> > contracts with HP/Compaq are/were), or you may find that they have an
>> > XP
>> > Upgrade or Full Install media already available for your machine.
>> >
>> > Regardless of whether you choose to go to XP or continue with WinME,
> back
>> > up your proprietary data, wipe the OS partition and install fresh;
> install
>> > Norton/McAffee last.
>> >
>> > On the hardware side you should at the very least allocate more
>> > on-board
>> > video-memory from the system BIOS (I'd recommend 64MB); this is a
> freebie,
>> > and consider getting a discrete graphics card if your mainboard has an
> AGP
>> > slot: Matrox are the best for 2D work; if you require heavy GL support,
>> > then ATI's FireGL series.
>> >
>> >
>> > Rick
>> >
>
>
September 19, 2005 12:48:22 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsme.general (More info?)

You suspect wrong. But if it had been a PCI version I probably could have
used it. I don't think that this particular card (Radeon 9600 Pro) came in
a PCI version; as a matter of fact I had the impression that ATI had dropped
PCI for their newer video cards. The specific connector problem is that
this card requires AGP 8X/4X; the computer has AGP 2X. The form-factor
situation renders it a moot point anyway. Some people check this stuff out
before they spend their money.

Joe


"Noel Paton" <NoelDPspamless@btopenworld.com> wrote in message
news:u0xstnIvFHA.3256@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> Joe - I suspect that your graphics card may be a PCI one :( 
>
>
> --
> Noel Paton (MS-MVP 2002-2005, Windows)
>
> Nil Carborundum Illegitemi
> http://www.btinternet.com/~winnoel/millsrpch.htm
>
> http://tinyurl.com/6oztj
>
> Please read http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm on how to post messages to NG's
>
> "Joe" <joe@ratherbeflying.invalid> wrote in message
> news:iYqdnTYerdelXrDeRVn-gw@comcast.com...
> >A note on my experience with new graphics cards and old Compaq computers:
> >
> > Mine is a DeskPro P-III 500 MHz.
> >
> > 1. AGP slots progress with time and technology, and they are keyed to
> > prevent use with incompatible cards. My AGP slot is two generations too
> > old
> > to mate with a modern graphics card. And:
> >
> > 2. My DeskPro has a separate graphics card--an ATI, yet--but it is in
no
> > way similar in form to a standard graphics card. So the card slot, the
> > connector position, and the size of the opening are all incompatible
with
> > any graphics card you would purchase. Is the Presario any different?
> >
> > I took a quick look to see if the computer had an AGP slot an went out
and
> > spent $200 on a new graphics card at CompUSA. By the time I got around
to
> > installing it, CompUSA's return window was long past, and only then did
I
> > discover the above!
> >
> > Joe
> >
> >
> >> > Under no circumstances should you install XP simply on top of your
> >> > existing WinME system. Among other technical considerations, you
will
> >> > most probably be moving your problems onto the new OS.
> >> >
> >> > Since you've already purchased an XP-Upgrade, I'd suggest contacting
HP
> > to
> >> > find out how to install it using your Compaq Windows Millenium CD as
> >> > "proof of previous OS" that the Upgrade Installer will require. You
> >> > may
> >> > find that you cannot do so legally (I don't know what Microsoft's
> >> > contracts with HP/Compaq are/were), or you may find that they have an
> >> > XP
> >> > Upgrade or Full Install media already available for your machine.
> >> >
> >> > Regardless of whether you choose to go to XP or continue with WinME,
> > back
> >> > up your proprietary data, wipe the OS partition and install fresh;
> > install
> >> > Norton/McAffee last.
> >> >
> >> > On the hardware side you should at the very least allocate more
> >> > on-board
> >> > video-memory from the system BIOS (I'd recommend 64MB); this is a
> > freebie,
> >> > and consider getting a discrete graphics card if your mainboard has
an
> > AGP
> >> > slot: Matrox are the best for 2D work; if you require heavy GL
support,
> >> > then ATI's FireGL series.
> >> >
> >> >
> >> > Rick
> >> >
> >
> >
>
>
Anonymous
September 19, 2005 1:32:30 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsme.general (More info?)

The form-factor for AGP has always been the same, with minor amendments for
differentiating the various speeds.
What I meant was that your motherboard may have had an onboard AGP chip, but
any extension card may have to be PCI.


--
Noel Paton (MS-MVP 2002-2005, Windows)

Nil Carborundum Illegitemi
http://www.btinternet.com/~winnoel/millsrpch.htm

http://tinyurl.com/6oztj

Please read http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm on how to post messages to NG's

"Joe" <joe@ratherbeflying.invalid> wrote in message
news:JZudndf6Z5z8VLDeRVn-sg@comcast.com...
> You suspect wrong. But if it had been a PCI version I probably could have
> used it. I don't think that this particular card (Radeon 9600 Pro) came
> in
> a PCI version; as a matter of fact I had the impression that ATI had
> dropped
> PCI for their newer video cards. The specific connector problem is that
> this card requires AGP 8X/4X; the computer has AGP 2X. The form-factor
> situation renders it a moot point anyway. Some people check this stuff
> out
> before they spend their money.
>
> Joe
>
>
> "Noel Paton" <NoelDPspamless@btopenworld.com> wrote in message
> news:u0xstnIvFHA.3256@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
>> Joe - I suspect that your graphics card may be a PCI one :( 
>>
>>
>> --
>> Noel Paton (MS-MVP 2002-2005, Windows)
>>
>> Nil Carborundum Illegitemi
>> http://www.btinternet.com/~winnoel/millsrpch.htm
>>
>> http://tinyurl.com/6oztj
>>
>> Please read http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm on how to post messages to NG's
>>
>> "Joe" <joe@ratherbeflying.invalid> wrote in message
>> news:iYqdnTYerdelXrDeRVn-gw@comcast.com...
>> >A note on my experience with new graphics cards and old Compaq
>> >computers:
>> >
>> > Mine is a DeskPro P-III 500 MHz.
>> >
>> > 1. AGP slots progress with time and technology, and they are keyed to
>> > prevent use with incompatible cards. My AGP slot is two generations
>> > too
>> > old
>> > to mate with a modern graphics card. And:
>> >
>> > 2. My DeskPro has a separate graphics card--an ATI, yet--but it is in
> no
>> > way similar in form to a standard graphics card. So the card slot, the
>> > connector position, and the size of the opening are all incompatible
> with
>> > any graphics card you would purchase. Is the Presario any different?
>> >
>> > I took a quick look to see if the computer had an AGP slot an went out
> and
>> > spent $200 on a new graphics card at CompUSA. By the time I got around
> to
>> > installing it, CompUSA's return window was long past, and only then did
> I
>> > discover the above!
>> >
>> > Joe
>> >
>> >
>> >> > Under no circumstances should you install XP simply on top of your
>> >> > existing WinME system. Among other technical considerations, you
> will
>> >> > most probably be moving your problems onto the new OS.
>> >> >
>> >> > Since you've already purchased an XP-Upgrade, I'd suggest contacting
> HP
>> > to
>> >> > find out how to install it using your Compaq Windows Millenium CD as
>> >> > "proof of previous OS" that the Upgrade Installer will require. You
>> >> > may
>> >> > find that you cannot do so legally (I don't know what Microsoft's
>> >> > contracts with HP/Compaq are/were), or you may find that they have
>> >> > an
>> >> > XP
>> >> > Upgrade or Full Install media already available for your machine.
>> >> >
>> >> > Regardless of whether you choose to go to XP or continue with WinME,
>> > back
>> >> > up your proprietary data, wipe the OS partition and install fresh;
>> > install
>> >> > Norton/McAffee last.
>> >> >
>> >> > On the hardware side you should at the very least allocate more
>> >> > on-board
>> >> > video-memory from the system BIOS (I'd recommend 64MB); this is a
>> > freebie,
>> >> > and consider getting a discrete graphics card if your mainboard has
> an
>> > AGP
>> >> > slot: Matrox are the best for 2D work; if you require heavy GL
> support,
>> >> > then ATI's FireGL series.
>> >> >
>> >> >
>> >> > Rick
>> >> >
>> >
>> >
>>
>>
>
>
Anonymous
September 19, 2005 2:39:38 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsme.general (More info?)

Noel,

There are I believe at least two AGP form factors due to earlier x1 and x2
models using different voltages to later x4 and x8 models.
--
Mike


Noel Paton <NoelDPspamless@btopenworld.com> wrote:

> The form-factor for AGP has always been the same, with minor
> amendments for differentiating the various speeds.
> What I meant was that your motherboard may have had an onboard AGP
> chip, but any extension card may have to be PCI.
Anonymous
September 19, 2005 3:26:47 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsme.general (More info?)

Noel,

See http://www.ertyu.org/~steven_nikkel/agpcompatibility.ht... for details
of the different voltages which are keyed differently on the card so that
for example a low voltage x8 card can't be inserted in a 3.3v x1 slot.
--
Mike


Mike M <No_Spam@Corned_Beef.Only> wrote:

> Noel,
>
> There are I believe at least two AGP form factors due to earlier x1
> and x2 models using different voltages to later x4 and x8 models.
>
>> The form-factor for AGP has always been the same, with minor
>> amendments for differentiating the various speeds.
>> What I meant was that your motherboard may have had an onboard AGP
>> chip, but any extension card may have to be PCI.
Anonymous
September 19, 2005 11:08:13 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsme.general (More info?)

The only difference is in the position/number of the 'divider', and the
actual length of the connector - Joe was saying that the slot was in a
different location (If I read him right), which to my mind means that the
slot was PCI. OTOH, If I read it wrong, then the slot could indeed be AGP1,
and the card he's trying to install is AGP8x

--
Noel Paton (MS-MVP 2002-2005, Windows)

Nil Carborundum Illegitemi
http://www.btinternet.com/~winnoel/millsrpch.htm

http://tinyurl.com/6oztj

Please read http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm on how to post messages to NG's

"Mike M" <No_Spam@Corned_Beef.Only> wrote in message
news:uNnPzAKvFHA.2008@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> Noel,
>
> See http://www.ertyu.org/~steven_nikkel/agpcompatibility.ht... for details
> of the different voltages which are keyed differently on the card so that
> for example a low voltage x8 card can't be inserted in a 3.3v x1 slot.
> --
> Mike
>
>
> Mike M <No_Spam@Corned_Beef.Only> wrote:
>
>> Noel,
>>
>> There are I believe at least two AGP form factors due to earlier x1
>> and x2 models using different voltages to later x4 and x8 models.
>>
>>> The form-factor for AGP has always been the same, with minor
>>> amendments for differentiating the various speeds.
>>> What I meant was that your motherboard may have had an onboard AGP
>>> chip, but any extension card may have to be PCI.
>
!