hdd shows up in Found New Hardware wizard

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

I have a w2k system that works great. I often unplug the
cd burner which is the master on the secondary to plug in
a hdd in order to fix it in some way. For the last few months,
every time I plug in a new hard drive, the found new hardware
wizard comes up. Often, if I ignore it and don't press any buttons,
I can still do what I want to do with the new hdd in My computer.

Now I have one that even though it did show once, I can't get to
see it again. Every time I restart the computer, the hardware wizard
comes up seeing the hdd and asking for a driver. so it is seeing the
hard drive.

How can I fix this stupid problem???

HELP!!!
14 answers Last reply
More about shows found hardware wizard
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Huh? 'splain better.

    johns
  2. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Computer has primary and secondary IDE. Each IDE has master and slave
    positions.
    My primary IDE has my somewhat permanent hdd's on both the master and slave
    of the primary.
    I only have one cd burner as the master on my secondary. It is convenient
    to disconnect that
    burner data cable and substitute plug in another harddrive out of a
    different computer to test it
    (scan for viruses, spyware, fix sectors, pull data prior to formatting it,
    etc.).

    Since a hdd doesn't require a driver, I was always able to do this no
    problems. But couple of
    months ago, every time I plugged in a hdd as master on the secondary, the
    found new hardware
    wizard would come on. That was no big deal because I would just ignore it
    and go to my computer
    and there would be the hdd and I could still do what I want (and just cancel
    new hardware found wizard).

    But lately, it has become more trouble. Even though the found new hardware
    comes on first thing and identifies the hdd (so I know the computer sees
    it), I am unable to see it in My Computer, and if I try
    to jump through the hoops of found new hardware wizard, naturally, it can't
    find a driver for the hdd and if I cancel the wizard, I still can't see hdd
    in My Computer.


    "johns" <johns123xxx@xxxmoscow.com> wrote in message
    news:d56s9a$f4q$1@news.fsr.net...
    > Huh? 'splain better.
    >
    > johns
    >
    >
  3. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    dancer wrote:
    > Computer has primary and secondary IDE. Each IDE has master and slave
    > positions.
    > My primary IDE has my somewhat permanent hdd's on both the master and slave
    > of the primary.
    > I only have one cd burner as the master on my secondary. It is convenient
    > to disconnect that
    > burner data cable and substitute plug in another harddrive out of a
    > different computer to test it
    > (scan for viruses, spyware, fix sectors, pull data prior to formatting it,
    > etc.).
    >
    > Since a hdd doesn't require a driver, I was always able to do this no
    > problems. But couple of
    > months ago, every time I plugged in a hdd as master on the secondary, the
    > found new hardware
    > wizard would come on. That was no big deal because I would just ignore it
    > and go to my computer
    > and there would be the hdd and I could still do what I want (and just cancel
    > new hardware found wizard).
    >
    > But lately, it has become more trouble. Even though the found new hardware
    > comes on first thing and identifies the hdd (so I know the computer sees
    > it), I am unable to see it in My Computer, and if I try
    > to jump through the hoops of found new hardware wizard, naturally, it can't
    > find a driver for the hdd and if I cancel the wizard, I still can't see hdd
    > in My Computer.
    >
    >
    > "johns" <johns123xxx@xxxmoscow.com> wrote in message
    > news:d56s9a$f4q$1@news.fsr.net...
    >
    >>Huh? 'splain better.
    >>
    >>johns
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
    >
    We are not dealing with a HD formatted in NTFS on this secondary IDE
    cable, are we? If so, is the bootable HD (C) also formatted in NTFS?
  4. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "Ken" <user@domain.invalid> wrote in message
    news:82Kde.175207$cg1.153201@bgtnsc04-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...

    > >
    > We are not dealing with a HD formatted in NTFS on this secondary IDE
    > cable, are we? If so, is the bootable HD (C) also formatted in NTFS?

    Hi Ken and Johns, Thank you both for trying to help me.
    Actually, yes, all the hdd's are NTFS although I have always been able to
    see a hdd that I plugged into the secondary IDE master no matter what the
    format.

    I just changed my BIOS from a fast POST to normal and the drive does not
    show in BIOS but I think that has always been the case. I changed the
    secondary
    master from Auto detect to specifying that it was a HDD and that didn't help
    either.
    I also tried jumpering the add in hdd to be CS but that didn't help. I
    didn't know
    all of the specs of the hdd to specify them completely when I changed the
    detect
    method from auto detect to manually specify so now I will try to find those
    specs
    for the BIOS just to see if that works.

    Any help greatly appreciated,
    jenny
  5. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    suspect IDE cable ?..J

    "dancer" <dancerjen@bellsouth.net> wrote in message
    news:nQzde.1313$SC.710@bignews6.bellsouth.net...
    >I have a w2k system that works great. I often unplug the
    > cd burner which is the master on the secondary to plug in
    > a hdd in order to fix it in some way. For the last few months,
    > every time I plug in a new hard drive, the found new hardware
    > wizard comes up. Often, if I ignore it and don't press any buttons,
    > I can still do what I want to do with the new hdd in My computer.
    >
    > Now I have one that even though it did show once, I can't get to
    > see it again. Every time I restart the computer, the hardware wizard
    > comes up seeing the hdd and asking for a driver. so it is seeing the
    > hard drive.
    >
    > How can I fix this stupid problem???
    >
    > HELP!!!
    >
    >
  6. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "old jon" <jonbrookes@nospamntlworld.com> wrote in message
    news:BzKde.16426$Y46.3187@newsfe1-win.ntli.net...
    > suspect IDE cable ?..J

    It works perfectly to show the burner and I did actually replace the cable
    with
    no change. I picked an old cable out of my cable box so that isn't a great
    test
    but two bad cables is rather unlikely considering that both will see the
    burner.

    Thanks jon. I guess I will have to try and rig the hdd in place of my
    primary slave.
    That means I have to find a cable that has more distance between the two
    drives.
    May have to buy that.
  7. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    dancer wrote:
    > "Ken" <user@domain.invalid> wrote in message
    > news:82Kde.175207$cg1.153201@bgtnsc04-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
    >
    >
    >>We are not dealing with a HD formatted in NTFS on this secondary IDE
    >>cable, are we? If so, is the bootable HD (C) also formatted in NTFS?
    >
    >
    > Hi Ken and Johns, Thank you both for trying to help me.
    > Actually, yes, all the hdd's are NTFS although I have always been able to
    > see a hdd that I plugged into the secondary IDE master no matter what the
    > format.
    >
    > I just changed my BIOS from a fast POST to normal and the drive does not
    > show in BIOS but I think that has always been the case. I changed the
    > secondary
    > master from Auto detect to specifying that it was a HDD and that didn't help
    > either.
    > I also tried jumpering the add in hdd to be CS but that didn't help. I
    > didn't know
    > all of the specs of the hdd to specify them completely when I changed the
    > detect
    > method from auto detect to manually specify so now I will try to find those
    > specs
    > for the BIOS just to see if that works.
    >
    > Any help greatly appreciated,
    > jenny
    >
    >
    The reason I asked about the format, was that a NTFS format cannot be
    read by a FAT type drive. Since both are NTFS, that should not be a
    problem.

    One thing I would do and have done, because I too swap HDs in and out
    like you, is to designate your CD a drive letter that is higher than it
    would assume even if the extra HD were installed. For instance: If
    only one HD (C:) were installed, I would assign the letter E: to the CD.
    That way when the second HD was installed, it would be assigned D: and
    would not conflict with the CD.

    There is one thing that might have happened to your second HD. NTFS
    has a habit of assigning a letter to a HD if you allow it. This
    normally happens after a detection of new hardware, and upon a REBOOT
    with the HD still installed. I believe this is called a disk signature.
    When it happens, you must clear the disk signature.

    One example of this is if you clone a NTFS drive to a blank HD and want
    it to be bootable. You must disconnect the second HD from the system
    immediately after the cloning and use it as the C: drive once, because
    if you keep it in the D: position and reboot, it will not be usable as a
    bootable C: drive. I believe the signature is written on the reboot
    after it has been detected as new hardware. After it has once booted as
    the C: drive, it can then be put in the D: position without any problems.

    Is it possible that you inadvertently have a disk signature written on
    this drive??
  8. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "Ken" <user@domain.invalid> wrote in message
    news:alOde.175871$cg1.138282@bgtnsc04-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...


    > There is one thing that might have happened to your second HD. NTFS
    > has a habit of assigning a letter to a HD if you allow it. This
    > normally happens after a detection of new hardware, and upon a REBOOT
    > with the HD still installed. I believe this is called a disk signature.
    > When it happens, you must clear the disk signature.
    >
    > One example of this is if you clone a NTFS drive to a blank HD and want
    > it to be bootable. You must disconnect the second HD from the system
    > immediately after the cloning and use it as the C: drive once, because
    > if you keep it in the D: position and reboot, it will not be usable as a
    > bootable C: drive. I believe the signature is written on the reboot
    > after it has been detected as new hardware. After it has once booted as
    > the C: drive, it can then be put in the D: position without any problems.
    >
    > Is it possible that you inadvertently have a disk signature written on
    > this drive??

    I took the hdd out of laptop and put as secondary master in one of my
    computers. The found new hardware wizard came up but I ignored it.
    I was able to see the laptop hdd as drive D: (which is always the
    designation
    when I add hdd's). Fortunately, I moved all the important stuff I could
    think
    of to a folder on my C: desktop.

    Then I realized that I had not loaded spinrite 6 to my computer and couldn't
    do it now because the cd burner was unplugged. I wanted to run spinrite 6
    on this laptop hdd because I knew it had some bad sectors.

    So I replugged the burner back into the system and unplugged the laptop hdd
    from my system. I used my cd read/writer to read spinrite 6 and loaded it
    onto
    my desktop. Then I unplugged the burner once again and once again plugged
    in the laptop hdd. But this time I could not get it to show up no matter
    what I
    do.

    It doesn't show up in BIOS either. I can't remember if I have always seen
    every hdd in BIOS or not. I'm not sure if that is a prerequisite.

    But that's it. In trying to get my computer to see the laptop hdd again, I
    have
    tried making it a slave to primary and several other tricks all to no avail.
    I'm ready
    to give up - especially since I did get all the important stuff saved.

    Now I am ready to try a repair via the OS cd. (I think)
  9. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    dancer wrote:

    > "Ken" <user@domain.invalid> wrote in message
    > news:alOde.175871$cg1.138282@bgtnsc04-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
    >
    >
    >
    >>There is one thing that might have happened to your second HD. NTFS
    >>has a habit of assigning a letter to a HD if you allow it. This
    >>normally happens after a detection of new hardware, and upon a REBOOT
    >>with the HD still installed. I believe this is called a disk signature.
    >> When it happens, you must clear the disk signature.
    >>
    >>One example of this is if you clone a NTFS drive to a blank HD and want
    >>it to be bootable. You must disconnect the second HD from the system
    >>immediately after the cloning and use it as the C: drive once, because
    >>if you keep it in the D: position and reboot, it will not be usable as a
    >>bootable C: drive. I believe the signature is written on the reboot
    >>after it has been detected as new hardware. After it has once booted as
    >>the C: drive, it can then be put in the D: position without any problems.
    >>
    >>Is it possible that you inadvertently have a disk signature written on
    >>this drive??
    >
    >
    > I took the hdd out of laptop and put as secondary master in one of my
    > computers. The found new hardware wizard came up but I ignored it.
    > I was able to see the laptop hdd as drive D: (which is always the
    > designation
    > when I add hdd's). Fortunately, I moved all the important stuff I could
    > think
    > of to a folder on my C: desktop.
    >
    > Then I realized that I had not loaded spinrite 6 to my computer and couldn't
    > do it now because the cd burner was unplugged. I wanted to run spinrite 6
    > on this laptop hdd because I knew it had some bad sectors.
    >
    > So I replugged the burner back into the system and unplugged the laptop hdd
    > from my system. I used my cd read/writer to read spinrite 6 and loaded it
    > onto
    > my desktop. Then I unplugged the burner once again and once again plugged
    > in the laptop hdd. But this time I could not get it to show up no matter
    > what I
    > do.
    >
    > It doesn't show up in BIOS either. I can't remember if I have always seen
    > every hdd in BIOS or not. I'm not sure if that is a prerequisite.
    >
    > But that's it. In trying to get my computer to see the laptop hdd again, I
    > have
    > tried making it a slave to primary and several other tricks all to no avail.
    > I'm ready
    > to give up - especially since I did get all the important stuff saved.
    >
    > Now I am ready to try a repair via the OS cd. (I think)
    >
    >

    You have a couple of things that look like problems. For one, the BIOS
    should see the drive.

    Second, and assuming you're on XP, the new hardware wizard does more that
    just install a 'driver'. It also identifies the drive (the identity is
    stored in the registry) and assigns a drive letter so your assumption you
    can just 'cancel' it because no 'driver' is needed (actually, it is. It's
    just that it's likely the same one that's there for the other drives) seems
    premature. I can't say for sure what the symptom 'should' be as I've never
    canceled it but I suspect it thinks the drive (partition, actually) is
    'known' but that it has no drive letter assigned so it doesn't show in
    Explorer (I.E. you didn't want it installed? OK, it's not 'installed').

    That's just a guess but, to check it, go into Control Panel, Administrative
    Tools, Computer Management, Storage, Disk Management and find the drive.
    Then see if the partition has a drive letter assignment and, if not, assign
    one.

    The rest of your symptoms are consistent with that as moving the drive will
    have no effect after it's partitions are identified. You can put it
    anywhere and Windows will know it's 'that partition' with the same drive
    letter, or not if it doesn't have one, and a reinstall may not 'fix' it
    either as it will try to keep existing settings.
  10. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "Ken" <user@domain.invalid> wrote in message
    news:alOde.175871$cg1.138282@bgtnsc04-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
    > dancer wrote:
    >> "Ken" <user@domain.invalid> wrote in message
    >> news:82Kde.175207$cg1.153201@bgtnsc04-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
    >>
    >>
    >>>We are not dealing with a HD formatted in NTFS on this secondary IDE
    >>>cable, are we? If so, is the bootable HD (C) also formatted in NTFS?
    >>
    >>
    >> Hi Ken and Johns, Thank you both for trying to help me.
    >> Actually, yes, all the hdd's are NTFS although I have always been able to
    >> see a hdd that I plugged into the secondary IDE master no matter what the
    >> format.
    >>
    >> I just changed my BIOS from a fast POST to normal and the drive does not
    >> show in BIOS but I think that has always been the case. I changed the
    >> secondary
    >> master from Auto detect to specifying that it was a HDD and that didn't
    >> help
    >> either.
    >> I also tried jumpering the add in hdd to be CS but that didn't help. I
    >> didn't know
    >> all of the specs of the hdd to specify them completely when I changed the
    >> detect
    >> method from auto detect to manually specify so now I will try to find
    >> those
    >> specs
    >> for the BIOS just to see if that works.
    >>
    >> Any help greatly appreciated,
    >> jenny
    >>
    >>
    > The reason I asked about the format, was that a NTFS format cannot be read
    > by a FAT type drive.
    Ken - The drives are read by the OS. Doesn't matter what the system drive
    is formatted as. E.g., if you install Win 2K on a FAT formatted drive, the
    OS can still read/write to NTFS drives.


    Since both are NTFS, that should not be a
    > problem.
    >
    > One thing I would do and have done, because I too swap HDs in and out like
    > you, is to designate your CD a drive letter that is higher than it would
    > assume even if the extra HD were installed. For instance: If only one HD
    > (C:) were installed, I would assign the letter E: to the CD. That way when
    > the second HD was installed, it would be assigned D: and would not
    > conflict with the CD.
    >
    > There is one thing that might have happened to your second HD. NTFS has a
    > habit of assigning a letter to a HD if you allow it. This normally
    > happens after a detection of new hardware, and upon a REBOOT with the HD
    > still installed. I believe this is called a disk signature. When it
    > happens, you must clear the disk signature.
    >
    > One example of this is if you clone a NTFS drive to a blank HD and want it
    > to be bootable. You must disconnect the second HD from the system
    > immediately after the cloning and use it as the C: drive once, because if
    > you keep it in the D: position and reboot, it will not be usable as a
    > bootable C: drive. I believe the signature is written on the reboot after
    > it has been detected as new hardware. After it has once booted as the C:
    > drive, it can then be put in the D: position without any problems.
    >
    > Is it possible that you inadvertently have a disk signature written on
    > this drive??
  11. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    fj wrote:

    > "Ken" <user@domain.invalid> wrote in message
    > news:alOde.175871$cg1.138282@bgtnsc04-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
    >
    >>dancer wrote:
    >>
    >>>"Ken" <user@domain.invalid> wrote in message
    >>>news:82Kde.175207$cg1.153201@bgtnsc04-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>We are not dealing with a HD formatted in NTFS on this secondary IDE
    >>>>cable, are we? If so, is the bootable HD (C) also formatted in NTFS?
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>Hi Ken and Johns, Thank you both for trying to help me.
    >>>Actually, yes, all the hdd's are NTFS although I have always been able to
    >>>see a hdd that I plugged into the secondary IDE master no matter what the
    >>>format.
    >>>
    >>>I just changed my BIOS from a fast POST to normal and the drive does not
    >>>show in BIOS but I think that has always been the case. I changed the
    >>>secondary
    >>>master from Auto detect to specifying that it was a HDD and that didn't
    >>>help
    >>>either.
    >>>I also tried jumpering the add in hdd to be CS but that didn't help. I
    >>>didn't know
    >>>all of the specs of the hdd to specify them completely when I changed the
    >>>detect
    >>>method from auto detect to manually specify so now I will try to find
    >>>those
    >>>specs
    >>>for the BIOS just to see if that works.
    >>>
    >>>Any help greatly appreciated,
    >>>jenny
    >>>
    >>>
    >>
    >>The reason I asked about the format, was that a NTFS format cannot be read
    >>by a FAT type drive.
    >
    > Ken - The drives are read by the OS. Doesn't matter what the system drive
    > is formatted as. E.g., if you install Win 2K on a FAT formatted drive, the
    > OS can still read/write to NTFS drives.
    >
    >
    > Since both are NTFS, that should not be a
    >
    >>problem.

    I was not aware that it was OS dictated. I thought it was dictated by
    the format. Thanks for enlightening me.

    >>
    >>One thing I would do and have done, because I too swap HDs in and out like
    >>you, is to designate your CD a drive letter that is higher than it would
    >>assume even if the extra HD were installed. For instance: If only one HD
    >>(C:) were installed, I would assign the letter E: to the CD. That way when
    >>the second HD was installed, it would be assigned D: and would not
    >>conflict with the CD.
    >>
    >>There is one thing that might have happened to your second HD. NTFS has a
    >>habit of assigning a letter to a HD if you allow it. This normally
    >>happens after a detection of new hardware, and upon a REBOOT with the HD
    >>still installed. I believe this is called a disk signature. When it
    >>happens, you must clear the disk signature.
    >>
    >>One example of this is if you clone a NTFS drive to a blank HD and want it
    >>to be bootable. You must disconnect the second HD from the system
    >>immediately after the cloning and use it as the C: drive once, because if
    >>you keep it in the D: position and reboot, it will not be usable as a
    >>bootable C: drive. I believe the signature is written on the reboot after
    >>it has been detected as new hardware. After it has once booted as the C:
    >>drive, it can then be put in the D: position without any problems.
    >>
    >>Is it possible that you inadvertently have a disk signature written on
    >>this drive??
    >
    >
    >
  12. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Hey David, Great info! Thanks, Everyone, as it turned out, the hdd was
    going bad and apparent died (fortunately after I had moved all the important
    files that I could think of into a folder onto my desktop). So that was the
    reason that my computer would not see drive. I found this out by sticking
    it
    back in the laptop and trying to format and reinstall xp. That dog is dead.
    Thanks again to all.
    jenny


    "David Maynard" <nospam@private.net> wrote in message
    news:117g0oksca536e4@corp.supernews.com...

    >
    > You have a couple of things that look like problems. For one, the BIOS
    > should see the drive.
    >
    > Second, and assuming you're on XP, the new hardware wizard does more that
    > just install a 'driver'. It also identifies the drive (the identity is
    > stored in the registry) and assigns a drive letter so your assumption you
    > can just 'cancel' it because no 'driver' is needed (actually, it is. It's
    > just that it's likely the same one that's there for the other drives)
    seems
    > premature. I can't say for sure what the symptom 'should' be as I've never
    > canceled it but I suspect it thinks the drive (partition, actually) is
    > 'known' but that it has no drive letter assigned so it doesn't show in
    > Explorer (I.E. you didn't want it installed? OK, it's not 'installed').
    >
    > That's just a guess but, to check it, go into Control Panel,
    Administrative
    > Tools, Computer Management, Storage, Disk Management and find the drive.
    > Then see if the partition has a drive letter assignment and, if not,
    assign
    > one.
    >
    > The rest of your symptoms are consistent with that as moving the drive
    will
    > have no effect after it's partitions are identified. You can put it
    > anywhere and Windows will know it's 'that partition' with the same drive
    > letter, or not if it doesn't have one, and a reinstall may not 'fix' it
    > either as it will try to keep existing settings.
    >
    >
  13. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    As it turns out, the hdd went bad at some point in the testing.
    I know because I went to format and reinstall and no can do.
    The dog is dead.
  14. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    dancer wrote:

    > Hey David, Great info! Thanks, Everyone, as it turned out, the hdd was
    > going bad and apparent died (fortunately after I had moved all the important
    > files that I could think of into a folder onto my desktop). So that was the
    > reason that my computer would not see drive. I found this out by sticking
    > it
    > back in the laptop and trying to format and reinstall xp. That dog is dead.
    > Thanks again to all.
    > jenny

    Hehe. Yea, "dead drive" is a common cause of invisibility


    > "David Maynard" <nospam@private.net> wrote in message
    > news:117g0oksca536e4@corp.supernews.com...
    >
    >
    >>You have a couple of things that look like problems. For one, the BIOS
    >>should see the drive.
    >>
    >>Second, and assuming you're on XP, the new hardware wizard does more that
    >>just install a 'driver'. It also identifies the drive (the identity is
    >>stored in the registry) and assigns a drive letter so your assumption you
    >>can just 'cancel' it because no 'driver' is needed (actually, it is. It's
    >>just that it's likely the same one that's there for the other drives)
    >
    > seems
    >
    >>premature. I can't say for sure what the symptom 'should' be as I've never
    >>canceled it but I suspect it thinks the drive (partition, actually) is
    >>'known' but that it has no drive letter assigned so it doesn't show in
    >>Explorer (I.E. you didn't want it installed? OK, it's not 'installed').
    >>
    >>That's just a guess but, to check it, go into Control Panel,
    >
    > Administrative
    >
    >>Tools, Computer Management, Storage, Disk Management and find the drive.
    >>Then see if the partition has a drive letter assignment and, if not,
    >
    > assign
    >
    >>one.
    >>
    >>The rest of your symptoms are consistent with that as moving the drive
    >
    > will
    >
    >>have no effect after it's partitions are identified. You can put it
    >>anywhere and Windows will know it's 'that partition' with the same drive
    >>letter, or not if it doesn't have one, and a reinstall may not 'fix' it
    >>either as it will try to keep existing settings.
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
    >
Ask a new question

Read More

Homebuilt Hardware Hard Drives Systems