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Who makes the most reliable mainboards?

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May 4, 2005 10:59:25 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

I just had an ASUS P4C800E-Deluxe board go bad. It seems this is not an
unusual event: http://www.hardwareanalysis.com/content/topic/8069/?o=4...
I have real reservations about using this board again. I'm thinking I should
go with a board that, while it may not have as many features, is much more
reliable and well built. Does anyone have any info or links to information
on motherboard reliability ratings. Most ratings I've found address features
and price only. What brands do you have confidence in?
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
May 4, 2005 10:59:26 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

On Wed, 4 May 2005 06:59:25 -0400, "BP" <Zpoweretal@110.neZt> wrote:

>I just had an ASUS P4C800E-Deluxe board go bad. It seems this is not an
>unusual event: http://www.hardwareanalysis.com/content/topic/8069/?o=4...
>I have real reservations about using this board again. I'm thinking I should
>go with a board that, while it may not have as many features, is much more
>reliable and well built. Does anyone have any info or links to information
>on motherboard reliability ratings. Most ratings I've found address features
>and price only. What brands do you have confidence in?

ASUS.

--
Michael Cecil
http://home.comcast.net/~macecil/
http://home.comcast.net/~safehex/
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
May 4, 2005 10:59:26 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

On Wed, 4 May 2005 06:59:25 -0400, "BP" <Zpoweretal@110.neZt> wrote:

>I just had an ASUS P4C800E-Deluxe board go bad. It seems this is not an
>unusual event: http://www.hardwareanalysis.com/content/topic/8069/?o=4...
>I have real reservations about using this board again. I'm thinking I should
>go with a board that, while it may not have as many features, is much more
>reliable and well built. Does anyone have any info or links to information
>on motherboard reliability ratings. Most ratings I've found address features
>and price only. What brands do you have confidence in?
>

MSI

Bob
Related resources
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
May 4, 2005 10:59:26 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

BP wrote:

> I just had an ASUS P4C800E-Deluxe board go bad. It seems this is not an
> unusual event: http://www.hardwareanalysis.com/content/topic/8069/?o=4...
> I have real reservations about using this board again. I'm thinking I
> should go with a board that, while it may not have as many features, is
> much more reliable and well built. Does anyone have any info or links to
> information on motherboard reliability ratings. Most ratings I've found
> address features and price only. What brands do you have confidence in?

Honestly, as long as you use a top tier board maker like Gigabyte, MSI,
Abit, etc, I don't think there's much difference in the component quality.
Each brand has certain boards that are stellar and some that are
problematic. Sometimes, you'll even have great luck with problematic
boards. I own a Gigabyte GA-8IRXP board that users had lots of reboot
problems with when overclocking. It's been a great board for me, and it's
overclocked to 3.0 GHz (from 2.6 GHz).

Don't believe in those comparisons, either. Tom's hardware had a love affair
with Gigabyte for awhile, then MSI. Also, the manufacturers give hand
selected samples to them, and even fudge things in the BIOS to get them to
run better. It used to be that boards would show up a couple of MHz hotter
on the FSB, but reviewers started getting smarter about that. Then, MSI
snuck in dynamic overclocking on them. It's all a game, just like the
nVidia vs. ATi war. They all cheat...some more than others.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
May 4, 2005 1:30:33 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

BP wrote:
> I just had an ASUS P4C800E-Deluxe board go bad. It seems this is not
> an unusual event:
> http://www.hardwareanalysis.com/content/topic/8069/?o=4...
> I have real reservations about using this board again. I'm thinking I
> should go with a board that, while it may not have as many features,
> is much more reliable and well built. Does anyone have any info or
> links to information on motherboard reliability ratings. Most ratings
> I've found address features and price only. What brands do you have
> confidence in?

I have had good luck with Asus and MSI. Just remember to RTFM when setting
them up.
May 4, 2005 4:25:25 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

Aopen , Asus



"BP" <Zpoweretal@110.neZt> wrote in message
news:FfadnRdEUqvfNuXfRVn-sQ@conversent.net...
> I just had an ASUS P4C800E-Deluxe board go bad. It seems this is not an
> unusual event: http://www.hardwareanalysis.com/content/topic/8069/?o=4...
> I have real reservations about using this board again. I'm thinking I
should
> go with a board that, while it may not have as many features, is much more
> reliable and well built. Does anyone have any info or links to information
> on motherboard reliability ratings. Most ratings I've found address
features
> and price only. What brands do you have confidence in?
>
>
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
May 4, 2005 5:48:58 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

ASUS, I have old asus boards that still work even after the cpu died. I've
had good luck with them but they tend to be expensive. I went gigabyte on my
last upgrade

"BP" <Zpoweretal@110.neZt> wrote in message
news:FfadnRdEUqvfNuXfRVn-sQ@conversent.net...
>I just had an ASUS P4C800E-Deluxe board go bad. It seems this is not an
> unusual event: http://www.hardwareanalysis.com/content/topic/8069/?o=4...
> I have real reservations about using this board again. I'm thinking I
> should
> go with a board that, while it may not have as many features, is much more
> reliable and well built. Does anyone have any info or links to information
> on motherboard reliability ratings. Most ratings I've found address
> features
> and price only. What brands do you have confidence in?
>
>
May 4, 2005 6:51:07 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

I currently have a SOYO motherboard in my home system. I built two
identical systems at the same time and they are both running error-free: no
system hangs (related to the mobo that is...software is a different issue).
Both systems are AMD based (not knocking Intel here, just giving info).
Haven't found anything I can't do yet with this system....but I'm sure
there's plenty I haven't tried (wink).

Anyway, there is one down-side I can mention about SOYO (this is a biased
because I was very impatient at the time - for various reasons, many not
related to the experience itself): I had to do some dealings with the SOYO
tech support folks and wasn't real happy about a few things. It seemed to
take an inordinate amount of time to get my problem solved (won't go into
details). I am a computer technician by trade - 12 years experience. To
make a long story short, I had to replace one of the motherboards during
initial system setups because one of the new boards was bad (it happens).
Short of my lack of patience with their tech folks, I've got plenty of
confidence in their product.

I've also used Abit boards in the past, but I'm not up to speed on their
current boards, so I won't comment. My past experiences with them has been
all good.

Intel boards are not as bad as everyone seems to think (giant industry isn't
normally liked very much) but I wouldn't build a home system for myself
using an Intel board: I don't have enough faith in their ability to perform
well as a gaming system..mostly they seem to be geared toward office-type
work.

So there you have it - my humble two-cents worth.

Here's hoping you lots of luck.

-TomClymer

"BP" <Zpoweretal@110.neZt> wrote in message
news:FfadnRdEUqvfNuXfRVn-sQ@conversent.net...
>I just had an ASUS P4C800E-Deluxe board go bad. It seems this is not an
> unusual event: http://www.hardwareanalysis.com/content/topic/8069/?o=4...
> I have real reservations about using this board again. I'm thinking I
> should
> go with a board that, while it may not have as many features, is much more
> reliable and well built. Does anyone have any info or links to information
> on motherboard reliability ratings. Most ratings I've found address
> features
> and price only. What brands do you have confidence in?
>
>
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
May 4, 2005 8:25:32 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

Also have had no probs with MSI boards, in fact I now use them in any PC
builds,

PT


"sbb78247" <sbb78247@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:D 5bpfg.25c.1@133.256.1.103.MISMATCH...
> BP wrote:
>> I just had an ASUS P4C800E-Deluxe board go bad. It seems this is not
>> an unusual event:
>> http://www.hardwareanalysis.com/content/topic/8069/?o=4...
>> I have real reservations about using this board again. I'm thinking I
>> should go with a board that, while it may not have as many features,
>> is much more reliable and well built. Does anyone have any info or
>> links to information on motherboard reliability ratings. Most ratings
>> I've found address features and price only. What brands do you have
>> confidence in?
>
> I have had good luck with Asus and MSI. Just remember to RTFM when
> setting them up.
>
May 4, 2005 11:07:57 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

RTFM?

"sbb78247" <sbb78247@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:D 5bpfg.25c.1@133.256.1.103.MISMATCH...
: BP wrote:
: > I just had an ASUS P4C800E-Deluxe board go bad. It seems this is not
: > an unusual event:
: > http://www.hardwareanalysis.com/content/topic/8069/?o=4...
: > I have real reservations about using this board again. I'm thinking I
: > should go with a board that, while it may not have as many features,
: > is much more reliable and well built. Does anyone have any info or
: > links to information on motherboard reliability ratings. Most ratings
: > I've found address features and price only. What brands do you have
: > confidence in?
:
: I have had good luck with Asus and MSI. Just remember to RTFM when
setting
: them up.
:
:
May 4, 2005 11:15:31 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

Hey, thanks for the input. The consensus here is ASUS, MSI, with honorable
mentions for AOpen and Soyo. That will narrow the search parameters.
The guy that replaced my mainboard will only use Intel boards. He sells
systems and has "never had a problem with the Intel boards". OK.

Now the $189 question. Would YOU reinstall the P4C800E-Deluxe board that
ASUS will be RMAing back to me?

<TomClymer@Cox.Com> wrote in message
news:4t9ee.30639$fx3.21218@okepread02...
: I currently have a SOYO motherboard in my home system. I built two
: identical systems at the same time and they are both running error-free:
no
: system hangs (related to the mobo that is...software is a different
issue).
: Both systems are AMD based (not knocking Intel here, just giving info).
: Haven't found anything I can't do yet with this system....but I'm sure
: there's plenty I haven't tried (wink).
:
: Anyway, there is one down-side I can mention about SOYO (this is a biased
: because I was very impatient at the time - for various reasons, many not
: related to the experience itself): I had to do some dealings with the
SOYO
: tech support folks and wasn't real happy about a few things. It seemed to
: take an inordinate amount of time to get my problem solved (won't go into
: details). I am a computer technician by trade - 12 years experience. To
: make a long story short, I had to replace one of the motherboards during
: initial system setups because one of the new boards was bad (it happens).
: Short of my lack of patience with their tech folks, I've got plenty of
: confidence in their product.
:
: I've also used Abit boards in the past, but I'm not up to speed on their
: current boards, so I won't comment. My past experiences with them has
been
: all good.
:
: Intel boards are not as bad as everyone seems to think (giant industry
isn't
: normally liked very much) but I wouldn't build a home system for myself
: using an Intel board: I don't have enough faith in their ability to
perform
: well as a gaming system..mostly they seem to be geared toward office-type
: work.
:
: So there you have it - my humble two-cents worth.
:
: Here's hoping you lots of luck.
:
: -TomClymer
:
: "BP" <Zpoweretal@110.neZt> wrote in message
: news:FfadnRdEUqvfNuXfRVn-sQ@conversent.net...
: >I just had an ASUS P4C800E-Deluxe board go bad. It seems this is not an
: > unusual event: http://www.hardwareanalysis.com/content/topic/8069/?o=4...
: > I have real reservations about using this board again. I'm thinking I
: > should
: > go with a board that, while it may not have as many features, is much
more
: > reliable and well built. Does anyone have any info or links to
information
: > on motherboard reliability ratings. Most ratings I've found address
: > features
: > and price only. What brands do you have confidence in?
: >
: >
:
:
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
May 4, 2005 11:15:32 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

BP wrote:
> Hey, thanks for the input. The consensus here is ASUS, MSI, with
> honorable mentions for AOpen and Soyo. That will narrow the search
> parameters.
> The guy that replaced my mainboard will only use Intel boards. He
> sells systems and has "never had a problem with the Intel boards". OK.
>
> Now the $189 question. Would YOU reinstall the P4C800E-Deluxe board
> that ASUS will be RMAing back to me?
>
<snip>

Why not? Check the revision number and Bios to see if it is more current
than what you sent in. if it is a higher number then you have the
proverbial 50/50 chance. Otherwise, if you must spend the money get
something more current if you don't want to take the chance.

S
May 5, 2005 4:34:21 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

Gigabyte .. nVidia chipset only. ASUS is kid stuff, and
won't last.

johns
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
May 5, 2005 9:39:13 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

BP wrote:

> Hey, thanks for the input. The consensus here is ASUS, MSI, with honorable
> mentions for AOpen and Soyo. That will narrow the search parameters.
> The guy that replaced my mainboard will only use Intel boards. He sells
> systems and has "never had a problem with the Intel boards". OK.

Huh? I saw quite a few thumbs up for Gigabyte...
May 5, 2005 11:52:27 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

Kids stuff?...what happened you get a shock whilst playing at building a
machine with an asus board?

Nvidia indeed........... now there's gaming kids stuff..........

"johns" <johns123xxx@xxxmoscow.com> wrote in message
news:D 5ci9u$1qte$1@news.fsr.net...
> Gigabyte .. nVidia chipset only. ASUS is kid stuff, and
> won't last.
>
> johns
>
>
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
May 6, 2005 4:17:09 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

On Wed, 4 May 2005 06:59:25 -0400, "BP" <Zpoweretal@110.neZt> wrote:

>I just had an ASUS P4C800E-Deluxe board go bad. It seems this is not an
>unusual event: http://www.hardwareanalysis.com/content/topic/8069/?o=4...
>I have real reservations about using this board again. I'm thinking I should
>go with a board that, while it may not have as many features, is much more
>reliable and well built. Does anyone have any info or links to information
>on motherboard reliability ratings. Most ratings I've found address features
>and price only. What brands do you have confidence in?
>


Reading through that thread, it seemed that a lot of the people with
problems were trying to get by with power supplies less than 400watts.
I wouldn't use less than a 550 watt power supply today.

All motherboards seem to have some issues; usually from the chipset,
the bios, or a cheap component part.
May 6, 2005 10:56:02 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

<cheap bastard> wrote in message
news:uo5m71p4cc0uu97u43pl123qvj6gcbqvcf@4ax.com...
> On Wed, 4 May 2005 06:59:25 -0400, "BP" <Zpoweretal@110.neZt> wrote:
>
>>I just had an ASUS P4C800E-Deluxe board go bad. It seems this is not an
>>unusual event: http://www.hardwareanalysis.com/content/topic/8069/?o=4...
>>I have real reservations about using this board again. I'm thinking I
>>should
>>go with a board that, while it may not have as many features, is much more
>>reliable and well built. Does anyone have any info or links to information
>>on motherboard reliability ratings. Most ratings I've found address
>>features
>>and price only. What brands do you have confidence in?
>>
>
>
> Reading through that thread, it seemed that a lot of the people with
> problems were trying to get by with power supplies less than 400watts.
> I wouldn't use less than a 550 watt power supply today.
>
> All motherboards seem to have some issues; usually from the chipset,
> the bios, or a cheap component part.
>

I'm wondering if boards, by any maker, that have many features (10 pounds of
manure in a 5 pound bag) are more prone to meltdown than a simpler, plain
vanilla board.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
May 6, 2005 3:13:14 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

cheap bastard wrote:

> On Wed, 4 May 2005 06:59:25 -0400, "BP" <Zpoweretal@110.neZt>
> wrote:
>
>>I just had an ASUS P4C800E-Deluxe board go bad. It seems this is
>>not an unusual event:
>>http://www.hardwareanalysis.com/content/topic/8069/?o=4... I have
>>real reservations about using this board again. I'm thinking I
>>should go with a board that, while it may not have as many
>>features, is much more reliable and well built. Does anyone have
>>any info or links to information on motherboard reliability
>>ratings. Most ratings I've found address features and price
>>only. What brands do you have confidence in?
>>
>
>
> Reading through that thread, it seemed that a lot of the people
> with problems were trying to get by with power supplies less
> than 400watts. I wouldn't use less than a 550 watt power supply
> today.

But seriously.

Like any other component, a power supply should be
suited to the system requirements.

Many systems run just fine on 150 watt power supplies.





>
> All motherboards seem to have some issues; usually from the
> chipset, the bios, or a cheap component part.
>
>
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
May 7, 2005 1:45:40 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

cheap bastard wrote:

> Reading through that thread, it seemed that a lot of the people with
> problems were trying to get by with power supplies less than 400watts.
> I wouldn't use less than a 550 watt power supply today.
>
> All motherboards seem to have some issues; usually from the chipset,
> the bios, or a cheap component part.

You can get by just fine with a quality 300 watt PSU from someone like
Antec, but have problems with some garbage 500 watt PSU from someone you've
never heard of. Wattage ratings don't tell the real story. Check out the
amperage on the +12V line. That will paint you a better picture.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
May 8, 2005 7:52:27 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

"BP" <Zpoweretal@110.neZt> :
>I just had an ASUS P4C800E-Deluxe board go bad. It seems this is not an
>unusual event: http://www.hardwareanalysis.com/content/topic/8069/?o=4...
>I have real reservations about using this board again. I'm thinking I should
>go with a board that, while it may not have as many features, is much more
>reliable and well built. Does anyone have any info or links to information
>on motherboard reliability ratings. Most ratings I've found address features
>and price only. What brands do you have confidence in?
>
my preferences:
Supermicro, tyan
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
May 8, 2005 1:51:42 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

hona ponape wrote:

>
> my preferences:
> Supermicro, tyan
>

I'll have to get you drunk and exchange wallets. What do you like to
drink? :) 

For workstation boards it's hard to beat Tyan.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
May 8, 2005 7:01:28 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

"Timbertea" <timbusenet@sbcglobal.net> wrote in message
news:o ilfe.2$ce6.1@newssvr30.news.prodigy.com...
> hona ponape wrote:
>
>>
>> my preferences:
>> Supermicro, tyan
>
> I'll have to get you drunk and exchange wallets. What do you like to
> drink? :) 
>
> For workstation boards it's hard to beat Tyan.
>
>

Just built 3 P4 3.2 systems for a real estate office with Tyans with onboard
video, audio and lan. Went flawlessly. They have been going for a month in
the office without a single issue. I have to agree with you as far as
workstations go.

Ed
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
May 8, 2005 10:59:21 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

Ed Medlin writes:

> Just built 3 P4 3.2 systems for a real estate office with Tyans with onboard
> video, audio and lan. Went flawlessly. They have been going for a month in
> the office without a single issue. I have to agree with you as far as
> workstations go.

I've never heard of Tyan. How much do their boards cost? Their Web
site doesn't seem to give prices, which is usually a bad sign.

--
Transpose hotmail and mxsmanic in my e-mail address to reach me directly.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
May 8, 2005 10:59:22 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

"Mxsmanic" <mxsmanic@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:9ahs71537a1cu1p8sppumt32d296sh0bji@4ax.com...
>
> I've never heard of Tyan. How much do their boards cost?

http://www.pricegrabber.com/search.php?topcat_search=1&...

http://www.pricewatch.com/h/m2.aspx?i=2&p=30


> Their Web
> site doesn't seem to give prices, which is usually a bad sign.

Neither do the mills of forestry products, but their retailers do.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
May 8, 2005 10:59:23 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

"Gary C" <Clem_Kadiddlehopper@Crazy_Googinheimer.com> wrote:
> "Mxsmanic" <mxsmanic@hotmail.com> wrote in message

>> I've never heard of Tyan. How much do their boards cost?
....
>> Their Web
>> site doesn't seem to give prices, which is usually a bad sign.
>
> Neither do the mills of forestry products, but their retailers do.

currently, overall, I expect no more than links to sellers when
browsing products at a manufacturer's web site
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
May 9, 2005 2:24:56 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

Mxsmanic wrote:
> Ed Medlin writes:
>
>
>>Just built 3 P4 3.2 systems for a real estate office with Tyans with onboard
>>video, audio and lan. Went flawlessly. They have been going for a month in
>>the office without a single issue. I have to agree with you as far as
>>workstations go.
>
>
> I've never heard of Tyan. How much do their boards cost? Their Web
> site doesn't seem to give prices, which is usually a bad sign.
>


Tyan sells mostly server & workstation boards. They don't really go
after the single-CPU consumer market. The offerings they have for the
single-cpu consumer market are really dated.

Typical workstation board from Tyan is in the $300-580 range. Most of
the server boards are a bit less, depending on features. $500 for a
motherboard is only a small part of the cost for a professional level
workstation.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
May 9, 2005 6:05:21 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

Timbertea <timbusenet@sbcglobal.net> :
>hona ponape wrote:
>
>>
>> my preferences:
>> Supermicro, tyan
>>
>
>I'll have to get you drunk and exchange wallets. What do you like to
>drink? :) 
>
>For workstation boards it's hard to beat Tyan.
>
lol, I'll take you up on that. I'm not as picky about booze as i am about
motherboards.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
May 9, 2005 7:45:08 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

Timbertea writes:

> Tyan sells mostly server & workstation boards. They don't really go
> after the single-CPU consumer market. The offerings they have for the
> single-cpu consumer market are really dated.
>
> Typical workstation board from Tyan is in the $300-580 range. Most of
> the server boards are a bit less, depending on features. $500 for a
> motherboard is only a small part of the cost for a professional level
> workstation.

What does one do with a workstation, as opposed to an ordinary desktop,
that requires special boards and mulitple CPUs?

--
Transpose hotmail and mxsmanic in my e-mail address to reach me directly.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
May 9, 2005 7:45:09 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

Mxsmanic <mxsmanic@hotmail.com> :
>Timbertea writes:
>
>> Tyan sells mostly server & workstation boards. They don't really go
>> after the single-CPU consumer market. The offerings they have for the
>> single-cpu consumer market are really dated.
>>
>> Typical workstation board from Tyan is in the $300-580 range. Most of
>> the server boards are a bit less, depending on features. $500 for a
>> motherboard is only a small part of the cost for a professional level
>> workstation.
>
>What does one do with a workstation, as opposed to an ordinary desktop,
>that requires special boards and mulitple CPUs?
Nothing. "Workstation" class boards are usually tesetd more, so they tend
to have less stability issues. The downside to this is that they cost
more and are usually behind in offering the latest and greatest features.

As far as multiple processors go, there are many discussions on this
subject going on on every hardware group and web site. The new processors
from AMD and Intel are dual-core: two processors in one package (essentialy
the same as having two seperate processors).

Is it worth getting dual processors? For most people, the answer is no.
It depends what your plans are for your computer.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
May 9, 2005 8:16:26 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

Mxsmanic wrote:

> What does one do with a workstation, as opposed to an ordinary desktop,
> that requires special boards and mulitple CPUs?

3D rendering with LightWave 3D or something similar?
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
May 9, 2005 3:35:30 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

"Mxsmanic" <mxsmanic@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:9ahs71537a1cu1p8sppumt32d296sh0bji@4ax.com...
> Ed Medlin writes:
>
>> Just built 3 P4 3.2 systems for a real estate office with Tyans with
>> onboard
>> video, audio and lan. Went flawlessly. They have been going for a month
>> in
>> the office without a single issue. I have to agree with you as far as
>> workstations go.
>
> I've never heard of Tyan. How much do their boards cost? Their Web
> site doesn't seem to give prices, which is usually a bad sign.
>
> --
> Transpose hotmail and mxsmanic in my e-mail address to reach me directly.

Higher than most consumer based MBs. They are really reliable and are more
well known in the server market. These were customer request, so I just
built what he wanted.


Ed
May 9, 2005 7:53:31 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

Now we're talking. This is the kind of information I was looking for.

"Ed Medlin" <ed@edmedlin.com> wrote in message
news:6WHfe.234$1A6.76@newssvr17.news.prodigy.com...
>
> "Mxsmanic" <mxsmanic@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:9ahs71537a1cu1p8sppumt32d296sh0bji@4ax.com...
>> Ed Medlin writes:
>>
>>> Just built 3 P4 3.2 systems for a real estate office with Tyans with
>>> onboard
>>> video, audio and lan. Went flawlessly. They have been going for a month
>>> in
>>> the office without a single issue. I have to agree with you as far as
>>> workstations go.
>>
>> I've never heard of Tyan. How much do their boards cost? Their Web
>> site doesn't seem to give prices, which is usually a bad sign.
>>
>> --
>> Transpose hotmail and mxsmanic in my e-mail address to reach me directly.
>
> Higher than most consumer based MBs. They are really reliable and are more
> well known in the server market. These were customer request, so I just
> built what he wanted.
>
>
> Ed
>
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
May 9, 2005 10:44:33 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

Mon, 9 May 2005 15:53:31 -0400: written by "BP" <replytoall@only.net>:

>Now we're talking. This is the kind of information I was looking for.

I have two Tyan boards here that are about 4+ years old. They work
flawlessly and are still great boards. I upgraded to an ASUS because I
needed a faster processor for rendering video and I couldn't find any
Tyan boards for home server use, otherwise I'd have gone w/Tyan.

Let me say this, I never use anything other than Crucial memory with my
computers since I don't like to play games w/my hardware.
--


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Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
May 10, 2005 5:30:37 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

Mxsmanic wrote:
> Timbertea writes:
>
>
>>Tyan sells mostly server & workstation boards. They don't really go
>>after the single-CPU consumer market. The offerings they have for the
>>single-cpu consumer market are really dated.
>>
>>Typical workstation board from Tyan is in the $300-580 range. Most of
>>the server boards are a bit less, depending on features. $500 for a
>>motherboard is only a small part of the cost for a professional level
>>workstation.
>
>
> What does one do with a workstation, as opposed to an ordinary desktop,
> that requires special boards and mulitple CPUs?
>

The term is being diluted these days, as people are calling things that
aren't workstations workstations, and we do indeed have improvements in
graphics and dual core deskstop chips on the way...


The main reason to get a workstation up until about 3 years ago was
graphics, graphics, and graphics. If you wanted to do CAD/CAM, video
production & editing, rendering, animation, medical imaging (still a
good use, get your CT-scan back a lot sooner), and much of scientific
computing. Much of this could be done of a regular computer, but some of
the medical imaging and scientific computing really did need 64 bits due
to the size of the datasets, and consumer level systems would choke
trying to display those models.

Outside of those fields, there was another reason, most computers were
just horribly slow. Most heavy users had dual PIII/Celeron systems in
the early days just to make their job tolerable. Most of these were
still hard drive bound, but they were fast enough. Most of these folks
don't have a dual cpu workstation anymore, they have a fast P4. This
need went away after we broke the 2Ghz mark for most users.

In large part, thanks to gamers being willing to pay a premium, consumer
level cards are catching up and the graphics power is there now. They
still don't have the optimizations that professional cards have, but the
raw power is there. These improvements (engines, processors) do get
passed along to the professional cards (the main difference between them
is software more often than not). Thanks to PCI-E, the power
requirements can now be met without having to have a workstation board
as well.

If you did mostly 2D work, you could make the jump a lot sooner. If you
needed 3D, you had to wait.

The other area workstations compete is on memory & storage systems. You
wont find a desktop that allows you to have more than 4GB of memory
easily, you can buy a workstation board that will let you have 8-16GB of
memory. The board will typically also have SCSI 320, and fast PCI-X
slots for additional SCSI raid controllers. Heaven forbid you have to
access the slow substorage system though, even with 320 it's still
thousands of times slower than main memory - even when you have to use
slower memory to get huge sizes it still works out in your favor.

I think they still have a place in people working with 3D models,
medical imaging, certain kinds of people working in animation and film.
Most of the software development people will probably end up turning to
distributed computing and dual core desktops to fill their needs, many
of the CAD people can already switch without pain provided they can get
enough memory and make intelligent motherboard decisions & select the
right graphics card. Heavy multitaskers like myself will wait on dual
cores to switch. I'm trying to hold out for a A64 4400...
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
May 12, 2005 5:19:37 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

Just picked up a Tiger, half an hour ago, thx this conversation. Bought
a workstation with Tyan Tiger 100-board, dual P2 or P3 processors and 1
Meg RAM. Like this: http://www.tyan.com/products/html/tiger100.html. €
30 ($ 40).

hona ponape wrote:
>
> Timbertea <timbusenet@sbcglobal.net> :
> >hona ponape wrote:
> >
> >>
> >> my preferences:
> >> Supermicro, tyan
> >>
> >
> >I'll have to get you drunk and exchange wallets. What do you like to
> >drink? :) 
> >
> >For workstation boards it's hard to beat Tyan.
> >
> lol, I'll take you up on that. I'm not as picky about booze as i am about
> motherboards.
!