How much to build custom PC?

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

I have made some preliminary choices for the components for a new PC that I
want to build, but am not sure that I will be able to spare the time (or
have the ability). There are some PC repair shops around here that say that
they can get the components, and build it for me. What price can I expect?
Generally, it will be an Intel based computer with a Sonata case and an Asus
((P5AD2-E Premium) mb) with 2 gigs of ram and 2 250SATA drives.

TIA
23 answers Last reply
More about build custom
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "Paolo Pignatelli" <Paolo@DotNetStore.com> wrote:

    > I have made some preliminary choices for the components for a
    > new PC that I want to build, but am not sure that I will be able
    > to spare the time (or have the ability). There are some PC
    > repair shops around here that say that they can get the
    > components, and build it for me. What price can I expect?
    > Generally, it will be an Intel based computer with a Sonata case
    > and an Asus ((P5AD2-E Premium) mb) with 2 gigs of ram and 2
    > 250SATA drives.

    In my estimation, a homebuilt PC is significantly more expensive
    than a prefabricated PC. Besides enjoying the hobby and learning
    about computers, the idea behind homebuilding is
    tailoring/customization. The price will vary depending on your
    specific requirements and your location.
  2. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "Paolo Pignatelli" <Paolo@DotNetStore.com> wrote in message
    news:Xx1he.13050$Ee6.8815@fe12.lga...
    >I have made some preliminary choices for the components for a new PC that I
    > want to build, but am not sure that I will be able to spare the time (or
    > have the ability). There are some PC repair shops around here that say
    > that
    > they can get the components, and build it for me. What price can I
    > expect?
    > Generally, it will be an Intel based computer with a Sonata case and an
    > Asus
    > ((P5AD2-E Premium) mb) with 2 gigs of ram and 2 250SATA drives.
    >
    > TIA
    >
    >

    Someone in work here generally charges £50 for a build, this includes
    sourcing all the components. I have seen some online sites that charge £75,
    but I think that is a bit steep.

    It doesn't usually take too long to put a pc together, the time consuming
    part, I find, is installing all the software, but then you can set something
    going and come back to it later. It's not that difficult, as long as you
    know the basics (plug things in one at a time and make sure they work, make
    sure you get the cables in the right way round, etc).

    Grendel.
  3. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "Grendel" <me@me.com> wrote:

    > It doesn't usually take too long to put a pc together, the time
    > consuming part, I find, is installing all the software, but then
    > you can set something going and come back to it later. It's not
    > that difficult, as long as you know the basics (plug things in
    > one at a time and make sure they work, make sure you get the
    > cables in the right way round, etc).

    I expressed the same thing upon re-arriving here after a long
    absence, before much reading. I am surprised the trouble people
    get into while trying to put a system together. For a beginner,
    maybe better would be to buy a good-quality prebuilt system (maybe
    with as few parts as possible) and began swapping parts as your
    needs and the technologies change. Or maybe by a high quality
    bare-bones system. When the time comes to replace the mainboard or
    power supply and case, he will be ready to get into that.

    Have fun.
  4. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Thanks. I have installed hard drives, both SCSI and ATA, and RAM and
    boards, etc... . I have just never changed a CPU or installed the MB in the
    case. How much more difficult is it?

    TIA


    "John Doe" <jdoe@usenet.love.invalid> wrote in message
    news:Xns965557BA1C120wisdomfolly@207.115.63.158...
    > "Grendel" <me@me.com> wrote:
    >
    > > It doesn't usually take too long to put a pc together, the time
    > > consuming part, I find, is installing all the software, but then
    > > you can set something going and come back to it later. It's not
    > > that difficult, as long as you know the basics (plug things in
    > > one at a time and make sure they work, make sure you get the
    > > cables in the right way round, etc).
    >
    > I expressed the same thing upon re-arriving here after a long
    > absence, before much reading. I am surprised the trouble people
    > get into while trying to put a system together. For a beginner,
    > maybe better would be to buy a good-quality prebuilt system (maybe
    > with as few parts as possible) and began swapping parts as your
    > needs and the technologies change. Or maybe by a high quality
    > bare-bones system. When the time comes to replace the mainboard or
    > power supply and case, he will be ready to get into that.
    >
    > Have fun.
  5. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "John Doe" <jdoe@usenet.love.invalid> wrote in message
    news:Xns965554993BE7Awisdomfolly@207.115.63.158...
    > "Paolo Pignatelli" <Paolo@DotNetStore.com> wrote:
    >
    > In my estimation, a homebuilt PC is significantly more expensive
    > than a prefabricated PC

    Huh, on which planet? A machine costing about £500 in the shops can be
    built at home for around £300!
  6. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "Grendel" <me@me.com> wrote:
    > "John Doe" <jdoe@usenet.love.invalid> wrote in message
    >> "Paolo Pignatelli" <Paolo@DotNetStore.com> wrote:

    >> In my estimation, a homebuilt PC is significantly more expensive
    >> than a prefabricated PC
    >
    > Huh, on which planet?

    Earth.

    > A machine costing about œ500 in the shops can be
    > built at home for around œ300!

    On which planet?


    >
    >
    >
    >
    > Path: newssvr17.news.prodigy.com!newsdbm06.news.prodigy.com!newsdst02.news.prodigy.com!newsmst01a.news.prodigy.com!prodigy.com!newscon06.news.prodigy.com!prodigy.net!news-FFM2.ecrc.net!news1.dtag.de!newsfeed00.sul.t-online.de!t-online.de!npeer.de.kpn-eurorings.net!zen.net.uk!dedekind.zen.co.uk!nntp-peering.plus.net!ptn-nntp-feeder01.plus.net!ptn-nntp-spool02.plus.net!ptn-nntp-reader01.plus.net!not-for-mail
    > From: "Grendel" <me me.com>
    > Newsgroups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
    > References: <Xx1he.13050$Ee6.8815@fe12.lga> <Xns965554993BE7Awisdomfolly@207.115.63.158>
    > Subject: Re: How much to build custom PC?
    > Date: Fri, 13 May 2005 14:47:43 +0100
    > X-Priority: 3
    > X-MSMail-Priority: Normal
    > X-Newsreader: Microsoft Outlook Express 6.00.2900.2530
    > X-RFC2646: Format=Flowed; Original
    > X-MimeOLE: Produced By Microsoft MimeOLE V6.00.2900.2530
    > Lines: 12
    > Message-ID: <4284affe$0$13898$ed2619ec ptn-nntp-reader01.plus.net>
    > Organization: Customer of PlusNet plc (http://www.plus.net)
    > NNTP-Posting-Host: dff1fcfc.ptn-nntp-reader01.plus.net
    > X-Trace: DXC=QM`o9=237RSMY6o]TfF\[Wigd3Y`7Rb;^YZmCHj47lfUKHC=[HGJ^NWn=^<_]>?ff[kR3QbV]a79]J<RR9Oo>nS[
    > X-Complaints-To: abuse@plus.net
    > Xref: newsmst01a.news.prodigy.com alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt:435742
    >
    >
  7. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    > Thanks. I have installed hard drives, both SCSI and ATA, and RAM and
    > boards, etc... . I have just never changed a CPU or installed the MB in the
    > case. How much more difficult is it?

    It's not hard. You just need to take it slow because you won't
    know what you are doing. You put the CPU and its fan/heat sink
    onto the motherboard first, along with your sticks of RAM, then
    put the motherboard into the case (which probably will already
    have your power supply installed). Then you start plugging stuff
    in, which isn't hard if you use the booklet that comes with the
    motherboard as your step by step guide.
  8. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "John Doe" <jdoe@usenet.love.invalid> wrote in message
    news:Xns965560946E188wisdomfolly@207.115.63.158...
    > "Grendel" <me@me.com> wrote:
    >> "John Doe" <jdoe@usenet.love.invalid> wrote in message
    >>> "Paolo Pignatelli" <Paolo@DotNetStore.com> wrote:
    >
    >>> In my estimation, a homebuilt PC is significantly more expensive
    >>> than a prefabricated PC
    >>
    >> Huh, on which planet?
    >
    > Earth.
    >
    >> A machine costing about o500 in the shops can be
    >> built at home for around o300!
    >
    > On which planet?
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Path:
    >> newssvr17.news.prodigy.com!newsdbm06.news.prodigy.com!newsdst02.news.prodigy.com!newsmst01a.news.prodigy.com!prodigy.com!newscon06.news.prodigy.com!prodigy.net!news-FFM2.ecrc.net!news1.dtag.de!newsfeed00.sul.t-online.de!t-online.de!npeer.de.kpn-eurorings.net!zen.net.uk!dedekind.zen.co.uk!nntp-peering.plus.net!ptn-nntp-feeder01.plus.net!ptn-nntp-spool02.plus.net!ptn-nntp-reader01.plus.net!not-for-mail
    >> From: "Grendel" <me me.com>
    >> Newsgroups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
    >> References: <Xx1he.13050$Ee6.8815@fe12.lga>
    >> <Xns965554993BE7Awisdomfolly@207.115.63.158>
    >> Subject: Re: How much to build custom PC?
    >> Date: Fri, 13 May 2005 14:47:43 +0100
    >> X-Priority: 3
    >> X-MSMail-Priority: Normal
    >> X-Newsreader: Microsoft Outlook Express 6.00.2900.2530
    >> X-RFC2646: Format=Flowed; Original
    >> X-MimeOLE: Produced By Microsoft MimeOLE V6.00.2900.2530
    >> Lines: 12
    >> Message-ID: <4284affe$0$13898$ed2619ec ptn-nntp-reader01.plus.net>
    >> Organization: Customer of PlusNet plc (http://www.plus.net)
    >> NNTP-Posting-Host: dff1fcfc.ptn-nntp-reader01.plus.net
    >> X-Trace:
    >> DXC=QM`o9=237RSMY6o]TfF\[Wigd3Y`7Rb;^YZmCHj47lfUKHC=[HGJ^NWn=^<_]>?ff[kR3QbV]a79]J<RR9Oo>nS[
    >> X-Complaints-To: abuse@plus.net
    >> Xref: newsmst01a.news.prodigy.com alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt:435742
    >>
    >>
    >

    Do your own simple comparison. Check out the cheapie machines that
    supermarkets have started selling to see what's in them, look on the web at
    places like ebuyer for barebones systems, or Komplett for an upgrade bundle,
    or just build your own up using individual components (the supermarket ones
    are generally using low end parts, which are the cheapest). Simple maths
    really!

    I got a m/b, XP3000+ cpu, 51MB RAM, 160GB hard drive, 600W power supply all
    for around £200, so the rest of the bits shouldn't take it above £300.
  9. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Easy as pie. I've been doing it for years with one arm disabled. Just be
    patient and keep track of how the old parts went together. Usually with a
    new mobo you'll have have to change the mounting posts(standoffs) a
    bit.Unless its a new case too.
    I've found the part I like the least is intalling the tiny front
    panel,hd,fdd connectors.

    "Paolo Pignatelli" <Paolo@DotNetStore.com> wrote in message
    news:xI2he.1011$yx.806@fe08.lga...
    > Thanks. I have installed hard drives, both SCSI and ATA, and RAM and
    > boards, etc... . I have just never changed a CPU or installed the MB in
    the
    > case. How much more difficult is it?
    >
    > TIA
    >
    >
    > "John Doe" <jdoe@usenet.love.invalid> wrote in message
    > news:Xns965557BA1C120wisdomfolly@207.115.63.158...
    > > "Grendel" <me@me.com> wrote:
    > >
    > > > It doesn't usually take too long to put a pc together, the time
    > > > consuming part, I find, is installing all the software, but then
    > > > you can set something going and come back to it later. It's not
    > > > that difficult, as long as you know the basics (plug things in
    > > > one at a time and make sure they work, make sure you get the
    > > > cables in the right way round, etc).
    > >
    > > I expressed the same thing upon re-arriving here after a long
    > > absence, before much reading. I am surprised the trouble people
    > > get into while trying to put a system together. For a beginner,
    > > maybe better would be to buy a good-quality prebuilt system (maybe
    > > with as few parts as possible) and began swapping parts as your
    > > needs and the technologies change. Or maybe by a high quality
    > > bare-bones system. When the time comes to replace the mainboard or
    > > power supply and case, he will be ready to get into that.
    > >
    > > Have fun.
    >
    >
  10. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    In article <4284affe$0$13898$ed2619ec@ptn-nntp-reader01.plus.net>,
    Grendel says...
    >
    > "John Doe" <jdoe@usenet.love.invalid> wrote in message
    > news:Xns965554993BE7Awisdomfolly@207.115.63.158...
    > > "Paolo Pignatelli" <Paolo@DotNetStore.com> wrote:
    > >
    > > In my estimation, a homebuilt PC is significantly more expensive
    > > than a prefabricated PC
    >
    > Huh, on which planet? A machine costing about £500 in the shops can be
    > built at home for around £300!
    >
    Bet you can't beat the price of a Dell entry level. Don't forget to
    include the cost of XP Home OEM.


    --
    Conor

    "Of all the things I've lost, I miss my mind the most." O.Osbourne.
  11. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Grendel wrote:
    > "John Doe" <jdoe@usenet.love.invalid> wrote in message
    > news:Xns965560946E188wisdomfolly@207.115.63.158...
    >
    >>"Grendel" <me@me.com> wrote:
    >>
    >>>"John Doe" <jdoe@usenet.love.invalid> wrote in message
    >>>
    >>>>"Paolo Pignatelli" <Paolo@DotNetStore.com> wrote:
    >>
    >>>>In my estimation, a homebuilt PC is significantly more expensive
    >>>>than a prefabricated PC
    >>>
    >>>Huh, on which planet?
    >>
    >>Earth.
    >>
    >>
    >>>A machine costing about o500 in the shops can be
    >>>built at home for around o300!
    >>
    >>On which planet?
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>Path:
    >>>newssvr17.news.prodigy.com!newsdbm06.news.prodigy.com!newsdst02.news.prodigy.com!newsmst01a.news.prodigy.com!prodigy.com!newscon06.news.prodigy.com!prodigy.net!news-FFM2.ecrc.net!news1.dtag.de!newsfeed00.sul.t-online.de!t-online.de!npeer.de.kpn-eurorings.net!zen.net.uk!dedekind.zen.co.uk!nntp-peering.plus.net!ptn-nntp-feeder01.plus.net!ptn-nntp-spool02.plus.net!ptn-nntp-reader01.plus.net!not-for-mail
    >>>From: "Grendel" <me me.com>
    >>>Newsgroups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
    >>>References: <Xx1he.13050$Ee6.8815@fe12.lga>
    >>><Xns965554993BE7Awisdomfolly@207.115.63.158>
    >>>Subject: Re: How much to build custom PC?
    >>>Date: Fri, 13 May 2005 14:47:43 +0100
    >>>X-Priority: 3
    >>>X-MSMail-Priority: Normal
    >>>X-Newsreader: Microsoft Outlook Express 6.00.2900.2530
    >>>X-RFC2646: Format=Flowed; Original
    >>>X-MimeOLE: Produced By Microsoft MimeOLE V6.00.2900.2530
    >>>Lines: 12
    >>>Message-ID: <4284affe$0$13898$ed2619ec ptn-nntp-reader01.plus.net>
    >>>Organization: Customer of PlusNet plc (http://www.plus.net)
    >>>NNTP-Posting-Host: dff1fcfc.ptn-nntp-reader01.plus.net
    >>>X-Trace:
    >>>DXC=QM`o9=237RSMY6o]TfF\[Wigd3Y`7Rb;^YZmCHj47lfUKHC=[HGJ^NWn=^<_]>?ff[kR3QbV]a79]J<RR9Oo>nS[
    >>>X-Complaints-To: abuse@plus.net
    >>>Xref: newsmst01a.news.prodigy.com alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt:435742
    >>>
    >>>
    >>
    >
    > Do your own simple comparison. Check out the cheapie machines that
    > supermarkets have started selling to see what's in them, look on the web at
    > places like ebuyer for barebones systems, or Komplett for an upgrade bundle,
    > or just build your own up using individual components (the supermarket ones
    > are generally using low end parts, which are the cheapest). Simple maths
    > really!
    >
    > I got a m/b, XP3000+ cpu, 51MB RAM, 160GB hard drive, 600W power supply all
    > for around £200, so the rest of the bits shouldn't take it above £300.
    >
    >
    >

    I agree, Grendel (comic or Gerte?). To build a computer yourself, you
    get better quality components with better capabilities for significantly
    less $$$ than a prefab machine. Assembling it yourself will save you
    around another $50.

    Ari

    --
    spammage trappage: replace fishies_ with yahoo

    I'm going to die rather sooner than I'd like. I tried to protect my
    neighbours from crime, and became the victim of it. Complications in
    hospital following this resulted in a serious illness. I now need a bone
    marrow transplant. Many people around the world are waiting for a marrow
    transplant, too. Please volunteer to be a marrow donor:
    http://www.abmdr.org.au/
    http://www.marrow.org/
  12. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "spodosaurus" <spodosaurus@_yahoo_.com> wrote in message
    news:4284c37c$1@quokka.wn.com.au...

    >
    > I agree, Grendel (comic or Gerte?).

    I actually took my name from a Marillion song. The song is based on the
    famous story of Beowulf, but it's from Grendel's perpective.

    >
    > Ari
    >
    > --
    > spammage trappage: replace fishies_ with yahoo
    >
    > I'm going to die rather sooner than I'd like. I tried to protect my
    > neighbours from crime, and became the victim of it. Complications in
    > hospital following this resulted in a serious illness. I now need a bone
    > marrow transplant. Many people around the world are waiting for a marrow
    > transplant, too. Please volunteer to be a marrow donor:
    > http://www.abmdr.org.au/
    > http://www.marrow.org/

    Good idea. I registered a couple of years ago as a friend seriously needed
    a transplant. She managed to get a match and is much better now.

    For people in the UK, look at : http://www.anthonynolan.org.uk/

    Grendel.
  13. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Al Smith wrote:
    >> Thanks. I have installed hard drives, both SCSI and ATA, and RAM and
    >> boards, etc... . I have just never changed a CPU or installed the
    >> MB in the case. How much more difficult is it?
    >
    > It's not hard. You just need to take it slow because you won't
    > know what you are doing. You put the CPU and its fan/heat sink
    > onto the motherboard first, along with your sticks of RAM, then
    > put the motherboard into the case (which probably will already
    > have your power supply installed). Then you start plugging stuff
    > in, which isn't hard if you use the booklet that comes with the
    > motherboard as your step by step guide.


    BAAAAAHAHAHAHHAHHAHA! you really are an ignorant fool aren't you. What
    about voltages on say agp cards, hd compatibilities, and the such?
  14. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    On Fri, 13 May 2005 09:00:57 -0400, "Paolo Pignatelli"
    <Paolo@DotNetStore.com> wrote:

    >I have made some preliminary choices for the components for a new PC that I
    >want to build, but am not sure that I will be able to spare the time (or
    >have the ability). There are some PC repair shops around here that say that
    >they can get the components, and build it for me. What price can I expect?
    >Generally, it will be an Intel based computer with a Sonata case and an Asus
    >((P5AD2-E Premium) mb) with 2 gigs of ram and 2 250SATA drives.
    >
    >TIA
    >
    The CPU selected will have an impact on overall cost, and it should.
    This sounds like a $1500 system. Expect $100-150 for the build
    service cost and testing.
  15. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "Paolo Pignatelli" <Paolo@DotNetStore.com> wrote in message
    news:xI2he.1011$yx.806@fe08.lga...
    > Thanks. I have installed hard drives, both SCSI and ATA, and RAM and
    > boards, etc... . I have just never changed a CPU or installed the MB in
    > the
    > case. How much more difficult is it?

    A CPU is easy - just putting the heat sink takes a bit of care, but it's not
    complicated. The MB is just a tad more complicated, but if you can figure
    out a hard drive, you can figure out a MB.
  16. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    jeffc wrote:
    > "Paolo Pignatelli" <Paolo@DotNetStore.com> wrote in message
    > news:xI2he.1011$yx.806@fe08.lga...
    >> Thanks. I have installed hard drives, both SCSI and ATA, and RAM and
    >> boards, etc... . I have just never changed a CPU or installed the
    >> MB in the
    >> case. How much more difficult is it?
    >
    > A CPU is easy - just putting the heat sink takes a bit of care, but
    > it's not complicated. The MB is just a tad more complicated, but if
    > you can figure out a hard drive, you can figure out a MB.

    and the FSB?
  17. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "John Doe" <jdoe@usenet.love.invalid> wrote in message
    news:Xns965554993BE7Awisdomfolly@207.115.63.158...
    > "Paolo Pignatelli" <Paolo@DotNetStore.com> wrote:
    >
    >> I have made some preliminary choices for the components for a
    >> new PC that I want to build, but am not sure that I will be able
    >> to spare the time (or have the ability). There are some PC
    >> repair shops around here that say that they can get the
    >> components, and build it for me. What price can I expect?
    >> Generally, it will be an Intel based computer with a Sonata case
    >> and an Asus ((P5AD2-E Premium) mb) with 2 gigs of ram and 2
    >> 250SATA drives.
    >
    > In my estimation, a homebuilt PC is significantly more expensive
    > than a prefabricated PC.

    Yes and no. If you really compare apples to apples, that is, the exact same
    components in each one, is it really? Can you even get the exact components
    you want in a prefab computer? The main reason they're cheaper is that they
    dictate what components you get.
  18. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "Grendel" <me@me.com> wrote:

    > Do your own simple comparison.
    ....
    > I got a m/b, XP3000+ cpu, 51MB RAM, 160GB hard drive, 600W power
    > supply all for around £200,

    From ZipZoomFly:

    MSI K7N2 Delta2-LSR nForce2 Ultra 400
    $60

    AMD Athlon XP 3000+ 2.16GHz 333FSB 512KB
    $115

    Corsair VS512MB333 512MB DDR333
    $42

    IBM Hitachi Deskstar 7K250 160GB Ultra ATA/100 7200RPM
    $82.50

    Antec SmartPower 2.0 SP-350 350W Power Supply
    $60 (forget about a namebrand 600 W power supply)

    That's about $360.

    > so the rest of the bits shouldn't take it above £300.

    The rest is more than bits.

    Computer case, mouse, keyboard, DVD/CD drive, video card, sound
    card, modem, speakers, Windows and the usual bundle of software
    which is worth at least $3,000 [kidding].

    The devil is in the details.

    If you want to, you can buy junk and get more for less.
  19. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Paolo Pignatelli wrote:
    > I have made some preliminary choices for the components for a new PC that I
    > want to build, but am not sure that I will be able to spare the time (or
    > have the ability). There are some PC repair shops around here that say that
    > they can get the components, and build it for me. What price can I expect?
    > Generally, it will be an Intel based computer with a Sonata case and an Asus
    > ((P5AD2-E Premium) mb) with 2 gigs of ram and 2 250SATA drives.
    >
    > TIA
    >
    >


    This is all about user needs.

    You may or may not be able to save $ by building your own. I plan my own
    builds not with the thought of saving money, but with the goal of
    getting a machine suited exactly to my current needs, that has room for
    future upgrades, and that is free from proprietary surprises (like the
    Dell power supply fiasco). When finished, it is also free of bloated
    "software" packages that offer little in the way of actual utility, and
    seem mostly designed to get the naive user to purchase either a full
    edition, online services, or spend money on consumables (like ink!).

    After almost 20 years of PC use, I've been suffering as a user for
    almost as long as many of the marketing asshats that are trying to
    convice me to buy from Dell, Gateway or a big box store have been alive.
    I have a much better idea about what my needs are than they ever could
    have. It's also a pretty good bet that the Best Buy/Circuit City sales
    person knows damned little about what he/she is offering other than to
    push their current loss leader and get you to try and bite off on the
    extended warranty.

    "Homebuilt is cheaper". "Storebought is cheaper" Both are true: if the
    price point is your ONLY consideration, you can either shop or select
    cheaper build supplies to meet the low price mark.

    Of course, you will end up with a $25 motherboard that may not ever get
    the BIOS update it needs to move from Windows 98 to XP (or it may just
    stop playing with USB devices..). You will end up with a hard drive that
    is possibly guranteed for as a little as one year (when there are 3 and
    5 year guranteed drives available for only marginally more expense).

    You will have "integrated everything"...that tend to be harder to
    troubleshoot and repair/replace.

    For my own user needs (large dual displays for academic work and photo
    editing, more than the minumum ammount of RAM, high quality sound for a
    good 5.1 speaker system, lots of storage and both USB and firewire
    connectivity): I can certainly build for within 10% on either side of
    what I can buy. And, because of the occasional issues with my own
    technical expertise, I have an established relationshiop withn a very
    good local PC repair guy. He's told me that if I ever get tired or
    misconnecting wires or forgetting basic troubleshooting (yes, it did
    cost me $75 once after I neglected to try and reset the CMOS), he'll
    assemble my machine for a 1-hour labor charge. But, each of my homebuilt
    projects has worked from the first power-on.

    I've bought mid-upper cost prebuilt in the past, and found them full of
    compromises. At least with a home built (or self-selected components
    assembled by a trusted tech) I get to decide where to make them.

    Many people have had perfectly good experinces with mass market/prebuilt
    machines, and I'm delighted for them. I prefer the greater control
    results in my eventual computing experience when I roll my own....
  20. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    ropeyarn@gmail.com wrote:

    > You may or may not be able to save $ by building your own.

    Basically, budget builds are not a cost saver, but more extravagant builds
    are. I built my first machine with, then, top shelf stuff, and priced an
    Alienware machine with comparable stuff and it was quite a bit more
    expensive. I couldn't even match the componentry with a Dell or Gateway.
    But, for a budget build, you can't beat getting a nice eMachines on sale
    instead.


    --



    Registered Linux user #378193
  21. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    In article <d6543n.10c.1@133.256.1.103.MISMATCH>, sbb78247 says...
    > jeffc wrote:
    > > "Paolo Pignatelli" <Paolo@DotNetStore.com> wrote in message
    > > news:xI2he.1011$yx.806@fe08.lga...
    > >> Thanks. I have installed hard drives, both SCSI and ATA, and RAM and
    > >> boards, etc... . I have just never changed a CPU or installed the
    > >> MB in the
    > >> case. How much more difficult is it?
    > >
    > > A CPU is easy - just putting the heat sink takes a bit of care, but
    > > it's not complicated. The MB is just a tad more complicated, but if
    > > you can figure out a hard drive, you can figure out a MB.
    >
    > and the FSB?
    >
    Motherboard BIOS automagically detects it from the CPUID.


    --
    Conor

    "Of all the things I've lost, I miss my mind the most." O.Osbourne.
  22. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Components are easy to get and have em delivered to the door, building
    any system is not really rocket science, but one would need to have
    built more than a few systems.

    That's what I do, build custom systems, but don't think it will be
    cheap if you want good gear inside it, game boxes being the most
    expensive with video cards at a grand or so, cpu's much the same or
    more, the $ can add up very quickly.

    The big companies put out the name systems, like Dell, HP or Compaq
    but they are full of generic items, that last the warranty then die,
    cheaper than the good box but can be a real PIA when upgrading or
    getting repairs, the "generic ATX" quality system with quality gear
    will cost ya $4,000 or so.

    Even a good case with nothing inside it can cost you around $500, your
    board another $300, cpu $1,000-$1,500, vid card another $1,000, $500
    for some memory, one can start to see how it adds up so fast, and
    it's got no drives, sound card or other goodies yet.

    If money is no problem, great, I take 10% added to the top, a deposit
    up front of 25% not refundable if you pull out, what do ya want ?
    building em is the simple part, paying for em is the hard bit.
  23. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    digisol wrote:
    > Components are easy to get and have em delivered to the door, building
    > any system is not really rocket science, but one would need to have
    > built more than a few systems.
    >
    > That's what I do, build custom systems, but don't think it will be
    > cheap if you want good gear inside it, game boxes being the most
    > expensive with video cards at a grand or so, cpu's much the same or
    > more, the $ can add up very quickly.
    >
    > The big companies put out the name systems, like Dell, HP or Compaq
    > but they are full of generic items, that last the warranty then die,
    > cheaper than the good box but can be a real PIA when upgrading or
    > getting repairs, the "generic ATX" quality system with quality gear
    > will cost ya $4,000 or so.
    >
    > Even a good case with nothing inside it can cost you around $500, your
    > board another $300, cpu $1,000-$1,500, vid card another $1,000, $500
    > for some memory, one can start to see how it adds up so fast, and
    > it's got no drives, sound card or other goodies yet.
    >
    > If money is no problem, great, I take 10% added to the top, a deposit
    > up front of 25% not refundable if you pull out, what do ya want ?
    > building em is the simple part, paying for em is the hard bit.


    Yikes! These are all uber extreme high end price points. The components
    in this range is at the level of top of the line Alienware or Northwest
    Falcom machines.

    You can easily easily reduce the cost of any of these by 50% (or even
    75%) and still end up with a superb system --even for demanding current
    games.

    Half the battle with a local custom builder is an honest business
    relationship that will not result in being sold ultra premium parts
    unessecarily.
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