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Gamer Claims to Have Made $10,000+ USD in Diablo 3

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August 8, 2012 12:25:09 PM

Well i can see how this could be true. If you look at the first few days after the RMAH came out people were buying stuff like crazy. I saw streamers make $750 in a few days selling bad to decent gear, Not even the best item drops. Part of that was the game was fairly new and the amount of crazy good gear was very low.

Out of maybe the 10-15 items that I put up on the RMAH I've made $40 after fees, none of them any good. If you play the market and dedicate your time to making money on the RMAH you could make some good money.

I'm pretty surprised at the stuff selling on the RMAH to be honest. Its one thing to go out and buy a set of golf clubs for golf, but the way game items work is you never truly own the item you're just paying the money to rent it. Not to mention when you play golf its not like you will find a better set of clubs laying on the ground that you can upgrade too =P.
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August 8, 2012 12:29:46 PM

I wish I enjoyed the game more to play and make some money. I did the endgame with three classes and said "To heck with it", and boxed it.
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August 8, 2012 12:53:03 PM

...and that 10K is actually minus the 15% Blizzard nabbed from him.
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August 8, 2012 1:18:29 PM

ankit0x1hahaha...+10% tax +10% electricity bill +10% internet bills etc

What is so funny?

All that will be added to taxes.

Including the PC+games and all the equipment with office space and portion of the electricity.

Don't u know?
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August 8, 2012 1:20:52 PM

if he thinks an expensive golf club set helps him play better then he really needs to learn the game....golf clubs has nothing to do with it, it's called skill
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August 8, 2012 1:23:24 PM

Wow! Play Diablo 3, have fun, have money!
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August 8, 2012 1:26:55 PM

In the meantime, he could have been made $10,000 at a real job AND contributed to society in a meaningful way.

Trolling aside, I'm sure it takes quite a bit of chops to make that kind of cash just playing the virtual economy game, and is likely a pretty useful skill-set to build up for playing the real virtual economy game some day.
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August 8, 2012 1:31:51 PM

"if he thinks an expensive golf club set helps him play better then he really needs to learn the game....golf clubs has nothing to do with it, it's called skill"

So you are saying there is no difference between playing with a cheap set of 25 year old golf clubs and an expensive modern set? Essentially, anyone spending more then $20 on a set from a thrift shop is just throwing their money away?

What do the professionals use?
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August 8, 2012 1:46:58 PM

Reminds me of the article about how Valve hired an economist to examine their in-game economies.

How much actual time did it take him to make that $10k?

nebunif he thinks an expensive golf club set helps him play better then he really needs to learn the game....golf clubs has nothing to do with it, it's called skill


Not really--golf clubs have a profound effect on game once you get to a high level of skill--much like how any "enthusiast" object has a significant impact on your ability. Take competitive PC gaming, for example--high-end keyboards, mice, and network cards are geared toward giving the player an edge that they can't get with just average components. On the amateur level, these things are probably not noticeable, but as you increase your skills and abilities, you start to get limited by the components and not your abilities--so it all matters, it's not just skill. An expensive driver can get you more distance than a crap driver once you hit that skill level.

Same goes for running shoes if you're a competitive runner. Or racing tires and car design for competitive racers. At some point if you're good enough at something, your ability to achieve more is limited by the components you're using.
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August 8, 2012 1:48:59 PM

This is nothing. People make $10,000 per month on games like Runescape by gold farming. It's been harder with all of the updates, but this is still true.
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August 8, 2012 2:00:13 PM

Has a game's economy ever crashed before?
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August 8, 2012 2:00:29 PM

This is strange, because I have been putting a *very* good item on RMAH that's better than anything on there currently for that slot. I started at $250 max and it's now at $159, dropping by $10 at a time. It's a single neck piece that can give a hunter or monk 10k dps. I don't know how this guy is selling anything.
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August 8, 2012 2:00:49 PM

There's a lot of $211.65. I imagine this guy used that exploit to dupe items that was discovered a while ago
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August 8, 2012 2:18:46 PM

I think we all hate D3 for the following reasons:

a) We don't like to be exploited
b) We're used to games carrying an upfront cost of $30-$60 and that's it. We hate to incur costs that we haven't planned for.

While this guy takes a high-brow stance on the economics of the AH, the reality is that we hate the idea as casual gamers. The reason why we loved D2 so much is because there was an upfront cost of $60 that provided us months of entertainment and we knew that before buying the game.
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August 8, 2012 2:39:06 PM

Although the amount he made is quite low compared to a real job, I'm impressed that he managed to do it with D3. They should give him an ingame achievement for this ^_^
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August 8, 2012 2:48:18 PM

He's playing Diablo III's ultimate endgame. Farming.
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August 8, 2012 3:03:37 PM

That excludes those who never made it public and those who were botting. It's quite hard to believe.
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August 8, 2012 3:03:45 PM

Dumb money anyone!!
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August 8, 2012 3:13:30 PM

beaynThis is strange, because I have been putting a *very* good item on RMAH that's better than anything on there currently for that slot. I started at $250 max and it's now at $159, dropping by $10 at a time. It's a single neck piece that can give a hunter or monk 10k dps. I don't know how this guy is selling anything.

I'll give you 2 million gold for it :D 
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August 8, 2012 3:22:34 PM

"Although the amount he made is quite low compared to a real job"

What kind of real job do you mean? From the screenshot, he made at least* $2725.83 between 7/21 and 8/2. That is 13 days. If he could average that over the course of a year, it is equivalent to $76,585.34 per year. If he isn't claiming this as income [so not paying taxes, SS, FICA, etc], then it is equivalent to making $110K per year.


* I say at least since if the screenshot was taken during the day on 8/2, there might have been some additional sales on 8/2; and we don't know if there were any additional 7/21 lines that got cut off.
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August 8, 2012 3:36:21 PM

I've made over $8k. HOWEVER, nothing is selling anymore, I can show you my auctions with M's in gold up for days and not selling.

People aren't willing to spend cash on items unless you mark them way below the standard $0.25 per 100k.

I WAS making $2 per mil, now I'm lucky to get $0.50.
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August 8, 2012 3:37:27 PM

whiteodianI'll give you 2 million gold for it

It goes for about 500 million according to the gold AH. It's the best item I've found since the game released. I've only seen one item better on RMAH.
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August 8, 2012 3:45:18 PM

Maybe he can move out of grandma's basement now...
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August 8, 2012 3:52:02 PM

"I've made over $8k. HOWEVER, nothing is selling anymore".

I imagine if you are doing it in place of a job, you would always be transitioning from older games to newer ones where the markets are better. And the more you are in to it, the more you'll notice when the market is dying anyways, so those people will be the first to move on.
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August 8, 2012 4:22:22 PM

rosen380"I've made over $8k. HOWEVER, nothing is selling anymore". I imagine if you are doing it in place of a job, you would always be transitioning from older games to newer ones where the markets are better. And the more you are in to it, the more you'll notice when the market is dying anyways, so those people will be the first to move on.


http://i.imgur.com/gpKcA.png

D3 is dying and fast. There is NO end game content. How could the development have been that stupid? I think this game is a classic example of "take the money and run." A month to learn and a month to gear, and then you've got NOTHING else to do. No competitive play. Hell, no one even plays multiplayer. Blizzard needs to get their act together.
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August 8, 2012 4:49:47 PM

If this guy is being honest and made that much with no exploiting, wonder how much the farmers and botters made farming items with the Wizard invulnerability exploit?
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August 8, 2012 4:52:03 PM

D3 is not MMO, you only pay 60 buck instead of 13/mon. so no update on end game is expect.. unless you think blizzard will give out update for free.
the farming IS the end, only difference between d2 and d3 is AH and amount of item you can farm. in D2 i can farm high level rune, craft and set item.. the possibility is endless and make d2 much more enjoyable. in D3.. craft system is POS and anything you want can just buy off AH with bypass the end game.
blizzard shot themselves in the foot with all their greed, without AH D3 will last much much longer.
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August 8, 2012 5:18:37 PM

What you do is stop watching youtube and start farming diablo 3 while at work. That way you have a salary when no one buys your digital trinkets.
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August 8, 2012 6:07:37 PM

rosen380"if he thinks an expensive golf club set helps him play better then he really needs to learn the game....golf clubs has nothing to do with it, it's called skill"So you are saying there is no difference between playing with a cheap set of 25 year old golf clubs and an expensive modern set? Essentially, anyone spending more then $20 on a set from a thrift shop is just throwing their money away?What do the professionals use?


they are pro's. take 2 average golfers and pit them against each other. the one with the expensive sticks won't beat the guy with the cheap set 10/10, i have a 100$ set of irons and beat guys that drop 800$ on their iron sets.
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August 8, 2012 6:15:48 PM

I wouldn't expect 10/10. I'm not suggesting that spending a grand on clubs will turn an average golfer into an elite one. I'll bet Adam Dunn could hit more HRs than me using a pool cue rather than a bat :) 

If you take a golfer who is typically around 10 over par on a particular course with $10 yard sale clubs, and then hand them a $1000 set, where are they likely to be? Still 10 over? Eight over?
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August 8, 2012 6:36:38 PM

Well the clubs may or may not help but the fact is the gear in game does because clubs you buy in real life don't have stats on them. His analogy is kinda crappy but we get it. I would say a paintball analogy would be more accurate since cheap guns are inaccurate and don't shoot so far and that is less controllable than say swinging a club where its mostly based on you.
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August 8, 2012 8:04:42 PM

Value doesn't create itself out the demand for an item from a bunch of people. Value either comes from natural resources or is created by the amount of work someone has put in.

We will find ourselves stuck in deep excrements if we believe that value is created by demand alone. Oil isn't created just because there is demand for it, but if we can create value, which then transcends into currency that is ubiquitous among all markets/items, we will then create more value than there actually will be because of imaginary products and demand for cheap excrements.
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August 8, 2012 8:28:35 PM

Diablo 3 is the first game which brought gold farming industry to the western countries.
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August 8, 2012 8:57:31 PM

The article is a bit misleading. At first I thought OMG, this guy must be a fantastic gamer, he found $10,000 worth of items. But, if you read more carefully, he hasn't even defeated Diablo. He bought items found by others and resold them at a higher price. Impressive, IMO. This kind of skill could make him rich in the stock market.
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August 8, 2012 9:19:19 PM

I do the same thing on eBay-- if I see something I can buy for a fraction of what I can sell it for after eBay costs and shipping, I buy it and resell it. It doesn't seem like it would happen too often; sometimes it is as simple as they put it in the wrong category and used the wrong/mis-spelled keywords so the bulk of the interested parties never see the listing.

Often, I am buying things listed as 'for parts' or untested, that I think I can put a small amount of time into refurbishing...
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August 8, 2012 9:29:36 PM

Stop complaining and play Path Of Exile ::- D.
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August 8, 2012 10:15:31 PM

aevmThe article is a bit misleading. At first I thought OMG, this guy must be a fantastic gamer, he found $10,000 worth of items. But, if you read more carefully, he hasn't even defeated Diablo. He bought items found by others and resold them at a higher price. Impressive, IMO. This kind of skill could make him rich in the stock market.


Trading items and not farming has always been where the money is in Diablo games.
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August 8, 2012 10:58:36 PM

teh_chemReminds me of the article about how Valve hired an economist to examine their in-game economies.How much actual time did it take him to make that $10k?Not really--golf clubs have a profound effect on game once you get to a high level of skill--much like how any "enthusiast" object has a significant impact on your ability. Take competitive PC gaming, for example--high-end keyboards, mice, and network cards are geared toward giving the player an edge that they can't get with just average components. On the amateur level, these things are probably not noticeable, but as you increase your skills and abilities, you start to get limited by the components and not your abilities--so it all matters, it's not just skill. An expensive driver can get you more distance than a crap driver once you hit that skill level.Same goes for running shoes if you're a competitive runner. Or racing tires and car design for competitive racers. At some point if you're good enough at something, your ability to achieve more is limited by the components you're using.

lol....really now?...ok try this...go to the store and get the most expensive golf clubs, at the same time get a cheap set also...now, go on the driving range and hit some balls....there will be no difference if you don't know the basics of the game...get my point?...sure the clubs will feel different but they do not really improve someone's game if they don't really know the basics...it's a fact
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August 8, 2012 11:04:11 PM

aevmThis kind of skill could make him rich in the stock market.


You may think partially so, but strategies for an inefficient market with don't work out when more real money is at play in a very efficient market.

People are willing to let a few dollars or gold go when they are gaming as it is entertainment, not an investment. Just like how people will pay 400% market value for a beer at a bar or pay outrageous prices for food at a sporting event. Or even when gambling, amateur gamblers will throw money away on mathematically unsound bets, cause it brings enjoyment.

That stuff doesn't happen so much on WallStreet, where it isn't a game anymore but pure investment and mathematics where they have math/applied math (like CS/physics/ee)/econ PhDs coming up with the latest economic strategies and algorithms to squeeze out every penny.

That being said, the skill he SHOULD take away is to look for other inefficient markets and apply his arbitrage strategies there; NOT try to apply basic arbitrage strategies in a cutthroat efficient market.
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August 8, 2012 11:24:11 PM

teh_chemReminds me of the article about how Valve hired an economist to examine their in-game economies.How much actual time did it take him to make that $10k?
Not really--golf clubs have a profound effect on game once you get to a high level of skill--much like how any "enthusiast" object has a significant impact on your ability. Take competitive PC gaming, for example--high-end keyboards, mice, and network cards are geared toward giving the player an edge that they can't get with just average components. On the amateur level, these things are probably not noticeable, but as you increase your skills and abilities, you start to get limited by the components and not your abilities--so it all matters, it's not just skill. An expensive driver can get you more distance than a crap driver once you hit that skill level.Same goes for running shoes if you're a competitive runner. Or racing tires and car design for competitive racers. At some point if you're good enough at something, your ability to achieve more is limited by the components you're using.


Exactly. Anyone who's ever held a pair of VaporX skates in comparison to regular skates knows that the price can make a huge difference. What happens if a power skater in the NHL doesn't have to move half a pound to a pound per foot? They go faster.

What happens if they use a lighter, stronger stick? They don't tire as fast and don't break their sticks as often.

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August 9, 2012 12:40:48 AM

too many people overthinking golf analogy. everyone understands the point and intention of the analogy; stop arguing over semantics and corner cases.
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August 9, 2012 2:30:51 AM

raytsengtoo many people overthinking golf analogy. everyone understands the point and intention of the analogy; stop arguing over semantics and corner cases.


amen
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August 9, 2012 3:11:45 AM

djscribblesIn the meantime, he could have been made $10,000 at a real job AND contributed to society in a meaningful way. Trolling aside, I'm sure it takes quite a bit of chops to make that kind of cash just playing the virtual economy game, and is likely a pretty useful skill-set to build up for playing the real virtual economy game some day.

Like working for an O&G firm and help destroy the environment
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August 9, 2012 6:29:44 AM

zubikovI think we all hate D3 for the following reasons:a) We don't like to be exploitedb) We're used to games carrying an upfront cost of $30-$60 and that's it. We hate to incur costs that we haven't planned for.While this guy takes a high-brow stance on the economics of the AH, the reality is that we hate the idea as casual gamers. The reason why we loved D2 so much is because there was an upfront cost of $60 that provided us months of entertainment and we knew that before buying the game.


Well spoken, sir.
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August 9, 2012 9:00:56 AM

djscribblesIn the meantime, he could have been made $10,000 at a real job AND contributed to society in a meaningful way.


You do realize that about 80% of the global workforce is in the service industry which is actually not productive to society at all. A lot of which depends on making money out of movement of the said money.

Value is an idiotic term to begin with. Humanity reached a level of technology where it could create abundance in material goods, services, energy, food, water, etc. in a clean and sustainable capacity at the beginning of the 20th century (seeing how we were finding technological solutions to scarcity since the industrial revolution).
'Money' is an obsolete notion that has no realistic purpose because it stopped representing resources over 90 years ago (when the first great depression took place).
'Value' is a fictional notion today that lost relevance.

We can easily automate close to 90% of the global workforce today. To top it off, most of the production industry already IS fully (or mostly) automated as is.

thing to keep in mind: There is never enough money to go around because its produced out of debt, and notions of scarcity.
People never ask themselves if we have the resources and technology to accomplish things... instead they ask:
'How much does it 'cost''.
Such foolishness.

The more I read about 'tech news' the more I come across financial reports instead of actual technological news.

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August 9, 2012 1:09:13 PM

beaynThis is strange, because I have been putting a *very* good item on RMAH that's better than anything on there currently for that slot. I started at $250 max and it's now at $159, dropping by $10 at a time. It's a single neck piece that can give a hunter or monk 10k dps. I don't know how this guy is selling anything.


stats please
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August 16, 2012 1:06:52 AM

deksmanYou do realize that about 80% of the global workforce is in the service industry which is actually not productive to society at all.


When you begin an argument with a statement so patently stupid as the one you've made here, anything that follows is a loss no matter how clever. Once you get a fever that causes you to bleed from your eyes, ears, nose, and arse for a lack of telephone sanitizer technicians or garbage-men and can't get any help because there are no transport services to take you to unstaffed medical centers with dirty equipment, then maybe you can tell us all about how unproductive the service industry is.
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November 29, 2013 4:26:03 AM

8-14h per day for weeks/months and he made $10k. Awesome. Slave labor wages
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November 29, 2013 4:26:04 AM

8-14h per day for weeks/months and he made $10k. Awesome. Slave labor wages
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!