harddrive fans

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware (More info?)

I've seen various harddrive fans and I wonder if they make a difference.
I see how the ones that go in front of a harddrive could work, but the
ones that attach below a harddrive don't look like they would have
enough room to move air. What's the scoop?
5 answers Last reply
More about harddrive fans
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware (More info?)

    No One <aintnoway@blahblahblah.com> writes:
    >I've seen various harddrive fans and I wonder if they make a difference.
    > I see how the ones that go in front of a harddrive could work, but the
    >ones that attach below a harddrive don't look like they would have
    >enough room to move air. What's the scoop?

    The ones that attach below, and I've got one of those, seem to be
    a fairly thick aluminum sheet and bolt directly to the frame of the
    drive. Then I'm guessing they are trying to act like a heat sink,
    conduct heat from the frame to the sheet and the fans the blow air
    between sheet and drive, cooling the sheet of aluminum, and thus
    the drive.

    See if you can measure the temperature of the metal case of your drive.
    THen consider that raising the temp every x degrees cuts the life of
    semiconductors, and probably motors, bearings, etc, by 1/2. Try to
    decide whether the drive will be so tiny by the time it has a chance
    of failing that you won't care and will throw it away anyway.
  2. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware (More info?)

    No One wrote:

    > I've seen various harddrive fans and I wonder if they make a
    > difference.

    I seal the computer case with tape on the inside so that there is no
    way for air to get inside. Then I mount the hard drive on brackets
    and mount it in a 5" drive bay. I drill holes in the plastic bezel of
    the drive bay cover. When the power supply fan draws air into the
    computer the only place it can come from is through the holes in the
    bezel in front of the hard drive. This is more effective (for air
    flow) if you have 3 stacked 5" drive bays and you mount the hard drive
    in the middle and 2 optical drives above and below it.
  3. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware (More info?)

    Don Taylor <dont@agora.rdrop.com> wrote:
    > No One <aintnoway@blahblahblah.com> writes:

    >>I've seen various harddrive fans and I wonder if they make a
    >>difference. I see how the ones that go in front of a harddrive
    >>could work, but the ones that attach below a harddrive don't
    >>look like they would have enough room to move air. What's the
    >>scoop?

    > The ones that attach below, and I've got one of those, seem to
    > be a fairly thick aluminum sheet and bolt directly to the frame
    > of the drive. Then I'm guessing they are trying to act like a
    > heat sink, conduct heat from the frame to the sheet and the fans
    > the blow air between sheet and drive, cooling the sheet of
    > aluminum, and thus the drive.
    > See if you can measure the temperature of the metal case of your
    > drive. THen consider that raising the temp every x degrees cuts
    > the life of semiconductors, and probably motors, bearings, etc,
    > by 1/2.

    Every x degrees? From what starting point? I think you have about
    25% of the equation there.

    Manufacturers of common hard disk drives list the maximum ambient
    temperature, the maximum temperature of the air around the drive.
    Provided there is at least a small amount of clearance around the
    disk, blowing room temperature air over the drive will keep it
    cool.

    Apparently similar to spodosaurus's case, the Antec SLK3700 has a
    drive caddy right next to a large (120 mm) intake fan. I have no
    more worries about hard disk drive temperature.

    Have fun.
  4. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    No One wrote:
    > I've seen various harddrive fans and I wonder if they make a difference.
    > I see how the ones that go in front of a harddrive could work, but the
    > ones that attach below a harddrive don't look like they would have
    > enough room to move air. What's the scoop?

    The best hard drive cooling performance I've achieved was moving my
    computer to a new Antec case (SLK3000B) with a five hard drive mounting
    bracket (as it turns out, I have five hard drives in this computer).
    Even with the plastic front fan clip located in front of the drives, as
    long as I have the Vantec Stealth 120mm fan running on 5V rather than
    12V the system is nice and quiet (even with the Antec fan running at max
    at the back and another Vantec Stealth running on 5V on the side panel).
    However, when I touch the outside of the drives, they're luke warm.
    Three of these drives are Seagates that used to run VERY hot. Not
    exactly the answer you were looking for, but another perspective: buying
    a case to suit your hard drive cooling needs.

    Cheers,

    Ari

    --
    spammage trappage: replace fishies_ with yahoo

    I'm going to die rather sooner than I'd like. I tried to protect my
    neighbours from crime, and became the victim of it. Complications in
    hospital following this resulted in a serious illness. I now need a bone
    marrow transplant. Many people around the world are waiting for a marrow
    transplant, too. Please volunteer to be a marrow donor:
    http://www.abmdr.org.au/
    http://www.marrow.org/
  5. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware (More info?)

    Terry Wilson wrote:

    > I'd agree with John Doe on this. It's always seemed to me that
    > providing positive filtered air pressure inside the case would
    > keep everything much cleaner, as the escaping air has little
    > dust to leave behind. And the air will find every little
    > crack and cranny.
    >
    > This has always been a hotly debated topic.

    A few months ago I retro-fitted about 8 tower cases with new Zalman
    power supplies and new motherboards with the big copper/aluminum
    Zalman CPU heat sinks. I sealed the cases except (naturally) for the
    power supply fan. I mounted the hard drives on brackets in 5" drive
    bay.

    A few years ago we had a couple of servers that had those ventilated
    5" bezels with 3 small fans built into the bezel. They were
    absolutely filled with lint / dust. I removed the fans, cleaned the
    bezel, and put the fan-less bezels in front of the hard drive in the
    retro-fitted PC's.

    These Zalman power suppies don't exactly create a huge air flow in the
    case that would turn it into a vacuum cleaner, so the issue of
    positive or negative air flow is I think kind of extreme. An ordinary
    bezel with 24 holes drilled into it will create enough of an opening
    to allow air to be pulled into the case without causing any buildup of
    vacuum inside the case that would lead air to try to get in from other
    places. Removing the bezel completely would certainly be enough of an
    opening for this.

    If you want a quite PC without extra fans, then this is the best way
    to mount the hard drive and cool it.
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