AC transformer brick clutter - what's your solution?

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

I've got maybe 10 of these transformers that have the plug built into them.
They take up two slots or more on a standard power strip. I've got a bad
thing going here, daisy chaining one power strip to another. A real mess.

any recommendations for a power "strip" that would take maybe 8 of these
nuisance bricks? For a reasonable price?

I saw some interesting stuff under the "Power Sentry" label. Owned by
Fiskars.
14 answers Last reply
More about transformer brick clutter what solution
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "spoon2001" <invalid@invalid.invalid> wrote in message
    news:11e14mt45hd4lc5@corp.supernews.com...
    > I've got maybe 10 of these transformers that have the plug built into
    > them. They take up two slots or more on a standard power strip. I've got
    > a bad thing going here, daisy chaining one power strip to another. A real
    > mess.
    >
    > any recommendations for a power "strip" that would take maybe 8 of these
    > nuisance bricks? For a reasonable price?
    >
    > I saw some interesting stuff under the "Power Sentry" label. Owned by
    > Fiskars.
    >


    Some people use 12" extension cords to allow use of all slots
  2. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    In article <11e14mt45hd4lc5@corp.supernews.com>,
    spoon2001 <invalid@invalid.invalid> wrote:
    >I've got maybe 10 of these transformers that have the plug built into them.
    >They take up two slots or more on a standard power strip. I've got a bad
    >thing going here, daisy chaining one power strip to another. A real mess.
    >
    >any recommendations for a power "strip" that would take maybe 8 of these
    >nuisance bricks? For a reasonable price?
    >
    >I saw some interesting stuff under the "Power Sentry" label. Owned by
    >Fiskars.
    >


    You can buy 12 inch long "extension cords" that allow you to use all
    the sockets in you power strip, but it makes the wiring even uglier.

    You can get power strips up to 6 ft long with power plugs 6 inches
    apart. I frequently screw them on the wall behind a workbench or
    under a desk. WireMold is the big brand and Home Depot has them.
    Here's a pic;

    http://www.wiremold.com/www/commercial/products/images/application_photos/2000.jpg

    You could buy two and screw them to the wall with the socket
    placememnt offset by 3 inches. That would give you as many as
    24 sockets in a 6 ft space.


    --
    a d y k e s @ p a n i x . c o m

    Don't blame me. I voted for Gore.
  3. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    philo wrote:
    > "spoon2001" <invalid@invalid.invalid> wrote in message
    > news:11e14mt45hd4lc5@corp.supernews.com...
    >
    >>I've got maybe 10 of these transformers that have the plug built into
    >>them. They take up two slots or more on a standard power strip. I've got
    >>a bad thing going here, daisy chaining one power strip to another. A real
    >>mess.
    >>
    >>any recommendations for a power "strip" that would take maybe 8 of these
    >>nuisance bricks? For a reasonable price?
    >>
    >>I saw some interesting stuff under the "Power Sentry" label. Owned by
    >>Fiskars.
    >>
    >
    >
    >
    > Some people use 12" extension cords to allow use of all slots

    Cyberguys (cyberguys.com - no connection except being a customer) has
    what they call a "Liberator", which is basically a 12" extension cord --
    and a variant which is a 12" Y extension which lets you hang two warts
    in the space of one plug. Got a few of them and they save a lot of space.
  4. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "spoon2001" <invalid@invalid.invalid> wrote in message
    news:11e14mt45hd4lc5@corp.supernews.com...

    > I've got maybe 10 of these transformers that have the plug built into
    > them. They take up two slots or more on a standard power strip. I've got
    > a bad thing going here, daisy chaining one power strip to another. A real
    > mess.
    >
    > any recommendations for a power "strip" that would take maybe 8 of these
    > nuisance bricks? For a reasonable price?

    Google for something called "The Octopus" or something similar. It is
    like an AC strip, but has individual cords for each outlet. Kinda looks
    like an Octopus.

    Saw an ad for this. I don't remember where. Sorry.
  5. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    I once got from Microcenter 3" extenders that were designed for this very
    problem.

    "spoon2001" <invalid@invalid.invalid> wrote in message
    news:11e14mt45hd4lc5@corp.supernews.com...
    > I've got maybe 10 of these transformers that have the plug built into
    > them. They take up two slots or more on a standard power strip. I've got
    > a bad thing going here, daisy chaining one power strip to another. A real
    > mess.
    >
    > any recommendations for a power "strip" that would take maybe 8 of these
    > nuisance bricks? For a reasonable price?
    >
    > I saw some interesting stuff under the "Power Sentry" label. Owned by
    > Fiskars.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
  6. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "spoon2001" <invalid@invalid.invalid> wrote:

    >I've got maybe 10 of these transformers that have the plug built into them.
    >They take up two slots or more on a standard power strip. I've got a bad
    >thing going here, daisy chaining one power strip to another. A real mess.
    >
    >any recommendations for a power "strip" that would take maybe 8 of these
    >nuisance bricks? For a reasonable price?
    >
    >I saw some interesting stuff under the "Power Sentry" label. Owned by
    >Fiskars.
    >

    I'm working on a plug reducing plan. Started when I put a 12VDC power
    supply in a SFF PC - since I have a 12VDC 20A supply running for
    amateur radio gear, tapping a lead for the SFF PC was not hard.

    Then I got an auto adaptor for the laptop. Another tap from the 12
    supply, two fewer AC plugs to find outlets for.

    Now am looking and find that 99% of the power cubes are 12VDC out.
    Ahh. Only need to find some cords with mating plugs then trace out the
    polarity to make pigtails. Got the pigtail cords from a collection of
    power adaptors I have collected but have no idea what they were for
    originally.

    Eventually move all the accessories to their own 12V power supply.
    Part of the reason for this whole thing is that some cheap power
    adaptors can cause radio interference - not something I want. Using a
    higher quality power supply to power all the 12V thingies eliminates
    electrical noise, and reduces them all to one AC plug.

    --
    "A Sound Mind. A Healthy Body. Pick One" Mr. Hedge
  7. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    ric wrote:
    > "spoon2001" <invalid@invalid.invalid> wrote in message
    > news:11e14mt45hd4lc5@corp.supernews.com...
    >
    >> I've got maybe 10 of these transformers that have the plug built into
    >> them. They take up two slots or more on a standard power strip. I've got
    >> a bad thing going here, daisy chaining one power strip to
    >> another. A real mess.
    >>
    >> any recommendations for a power "strip" that would take maybe 8 of
    >> these nuisance bricks? For a reasonable price?
    >
    > Google for something called "The Octopus" or something similar. It is
    > like an AC strip, but has individual cords for each outlet. Kinda
    > looks like an Octopus.
    >
    > Saw an ad for this. I don't remember where. Sorry.

    I think you may mean the PowerSquid, shown here:

    http://tinyurl.com/9s4hu
  8. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Won't say it's the best idea but it's worked the best for me, so far. Take
    an extension cord, cut out a center section then put a female crimp-on
    receptacle at one side of the cut and a male crimp-on plug on the other. Now
    you have 2 ext cords of whatever length you make them. Most of mine are
    3-6", just enough to get them off the power strip. A lot of low current
    outlets can be added this way.
    Still a mess, but better.
    YMMV
  9. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    On Fri, 22 Jul 2005 01:31:44 -0500, spoon2001 wrote

    > any recommendations for a power "strip" that would take maybe 8 of these
    > nuisance bricks?

    How about a Kensington SmartSockets Premium Adapter Model?
    <http://www.kensington.com/html/1050.html>. That'll take 6 of your
    bricks.

    -- Vincent Horatius
  10. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    spoon2001 wrote:
    > I've got maybe 10 of these transformers that have the plug built into them.
    > They take up two slots or more on a standard power strip. I've got a bad
    > thing going here, daisy chaining one power strip to another. A real mess.
    >
    > any recommendations for a power "strip" that would take maybe 8 of these
    > nuisance bricks? For a reasonable price?
    >
    > I saw some interesting stuff under the "Power Sentry" label. Owned by
    > Fiskars.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    Plug in a second power strip, into your original power strip if
    necessary, but using the other half of the wall plug is probably safer.
    Fastening them to the back of the desk just below desk top level (or to
    the underside of the desk) keeps them accessible but out of site and
    helps to reduce wire clutter.

    John
  11. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Fry's/Outpost.com has electrical cords that are about 1' long that allows
    you to plug the brick into the cord, and then the cord into you power strip.


    "John" <John@nowhere.com> wrote in message
    news:BBCFe.9823$ab2.772@trndny07...
    > spoon2001 wrote:
    >> I've got maybe 10 of these transformers that have the plug built into
    >> them. They take up two slots or more on a standard power strip. I've got
    >> a bad thing going here, daisy chaining one power strip to another. A
    >> real mess.
    >>
    >> any recommendations for a power "strip" that would take maybe 8 of these
    >> nuisance bricks? For a reasonable price?
    >>
    >> I saw some interesting stuff under the "Power Sentry" label. Owned by
    >> Fiskars.
  12. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    I use a power strip designed to be use on a work bench. goes on the wall
    about 31/2 feet long X 1 1/2 wide. It has 8 outlets


    "spoon2001" <invalid@invalid.invalid> wrote in message
    news:11e14mt45hd4lc5@corp.supernews.com...
    > I've got maybe 10 of these transformers that have the plug built into
    them.
    > They take up two slots or more on a standard power strip. I've got a bad
    > thing going here, daisy chaining one power strip to another. A real mess.
    >
    > any recommendations for a power "strip" that would take maybe 8 of these
    > nuisance bricks? For a reasonable price?
    >
    > I saw some interesting stuff under the "Power Sentry" label. Owned by
    > Fiskars.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
  13. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    spoon2001 wrote:
    > I've got maybe 10 of these transformers that have the plug built into them.
    > They take up two slots or more on a standard power strip. I've got a bad
    > thing going here, daisy chaining one power strip to another. A real mess.

    Basic power strips are cheap, the specialize ones with more space
    between connectors are more expensive.

    Since most of these wall warts are for fairly low current, if they are
    for +5V or +12V, or both, you can wire the devices up to be powered off
    the PC's power supply, using the standard 4 pin Molex connectors.

    See "http://store.yahoo.com/svcompucycle/pcimolex-17.html" for a PCI
    card edge bracket with three outlets.

    I run a 15" LCD panel off the PC's 12V power, and I have a Molex to
    proprietary cable for an external hard drive, for when I use it.
  14. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Justice Gustine wrote:
    > "spoon2001" <invalid@invalid.invalid> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>I've got maybe 10 of these transformers that have the plug built into them.
    >>They take up two slots or more on a standard power strip. I've got a bad
    >>thing going here, daisy chaining one power strip to another. A real mess.
    >>
    >>any recommendations for a power "strip" that would take maybe 8 of these
    >>nuisance bricks? For a reasonable price?
    >>
    >>I saw some interesting stuff under the "Power Sentry" label. Owned by
    >>Fiskars.
    >>
    >
    >
    > I'm working on a plug reducing plan. Started when I put a 12VDC power
    > supply in a SFF PC - since I have a 12VDC 20A supply running for
    > amateur radio gear, tapping a lead for the SFF PC was not hard.
    >
    > Then I got an auto adaptor for the laptop. Another tap from the 12
    > supply, two fewer AC plugs to find outlets for.
    >
    > Now am looking and find that 99% of the power cubes are 12VDC out.
    > Ahh. Only need to find some cords with mating plugs then trace out the
    > polarity to make pigtails. Got the pigtail cords from a collection of
    > power adaptors I have collected but have no idea what they were for
    > originally.
    >
    > Eventually move all the accessories to their own 12V power supply.
    > Part of the reason for this whole thing is that some cheap power
    > adaptors can cause radio interference - not something I want. Using a
    > higher quality power supply to power all the 12V thingies eliminates
    > electrical noise, and reduces them all to one AC plug.

    I run as many devices as possible off the PC power supply using 4 pin
    male Molex connectors and one of those PCI card edge brackets with
    female Molex connectors (see
    http://store.yahoo.com/svcompucycle/pcimolex-17.html).

    With a 400W supply I have plenty of +12V and +5V capacity. And of course
    another advantage is that everything is turned on and off with the PC.
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