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Please diagnose my problem!

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August 19, 2005 7:01:27 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

Hi,

I was merrily using my PC when suddenly it gave me a blue screen of death.
This is what it said

DRIVER_IRQL_NOT_LESS_OR_EQUAL

There was more stuff though unfortunately I've forgotten it now.

So I restart and it wont even get to the post screen and the motherboard is
beeping. It's a constant beeping, about a 1 second long beep followed by
approximately a 1 second pause and then beeps again - and it does this
continuously.

So after lots of restarting, turning off and leaving for a while then trying
again, it went to the BIOS page and under the CPU settings it said something
like your CPU is running too fast...

From what I've read when looking up this problem it seems it could be a
power problem (or at least that is what people have said on forums).

I tried another power supply but I still get the beeping and no post screen.
MY LCD monitor doesn't even appear to be getting a signal.

I pulled out my RAM and still got the same beeping so I guess the problem
occurs before a RAM check is made.

My motherboard is an ASUS A7V8-X. My CPU IS an AMD 2600+

Any help much appreciated!

--
Jabba

More about : diagnose problem

Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
August 19, 2005 7:01:28 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

hmm well the good news is - your MB is ok..but I think you probally
already knew that.. now the bad part... Your ram might be toast... and
your system might of overheated..

-power off-

First things first.. Clean out the inside, buy some canned air and
blast it.. check all your fans.. make sure they are all blowing the
right way. Fans should spin freely when blown with canned air or spun
by hand.. any hesitation in the fans spinning while off is a sign of a
dead or dying motor/bearing. Replace and continue testing..

next-
do you have any other ram that you could try out in it? if so, take out
your ram and pop the tester stuff in.. same beeps- try a different ram
slot.. different beeps. move on to next step and see what else is
damaged..

if you dont have a piece of ram that could work as a test strip.. call
up a local computer repair store.. many of them have ram testers and
can test your current stick of ram. and many do it for free, others
will do for free if your a regualar customer, the rest might charge.. I
wouldn't pay more then 5-10$ to test for it (if they dont have a
stand-alone tester and they would have to put it into a working systsem
to check it) I used to work at Best buy and before we got a standalone
we charged 10$ for it cause of the extra effort it took us.. if they
got a stand-alone.. dont expect that your wont get charged, for alot of
shops big or small time is money and they expect something.. (either
pay for time or make a purchase) but personally if i had a tester and
was running my own business/shop, ram tests with a tester is simple,
plug in tester, plug in ram, power on tester.. walk away.. audible
beeps will tell you good or bad or lights will tell you the same..

if ram is good.. then it might of just overheated and the system when
nuts.. I had an Asus and mine would say the same thing even though I
had the settings right on the money, but poor cooling caused the same
problem alot.. even the error in bios.


BTW did a reasearch on that BSOD stop error message. Microsoft says its
a driver issue but many fourms also relay it to Overclocking, dunno if
you are or not but the issue with OC is heat.. so if you Troubleshoot
all the issues around your heat problems and still get that error.. you
may need some driver, bios, and other updates..

lemme know
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
August 19, 2005 7:01:28 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

Many people will say it is this or that. IOW they are
guessing. They are also expert automobile mechanics. Worse
still, they will not even say WHY it is this or that which
means wild speculation.

If somehow the BIOS got changed, then reset the BIOS to
defaults ... AFTER recording what was originally in that
BIOS. Some BIOS defaults are intentionally different to
correct hardware incompatibility problems. Always record all
previously information before changing anything.

Try swapping memory SIMMs to get the machine to boot. If
swapping solves a booting problem, then one of those SIMMs is
probably defective.

A long list of reasons that could create the failure. So we
don't yet even worry about fixing the problem. First we must
understand it. For starters, what does the error message
say. Many will just say to do this when you get that
message. IOW they speculate. But the message suggests a
computer program tried to access memory that was illegal to
access. So why did program do that? Memory error? Defective
software? We don't know from what you have reported. So we
move on to collecting relevant facts - and don't yet try to
fix anything.

What does the Event (system) log report? Was this due to a
problem that your system had seen previously and had
previously worked around? Information from Event log is
necessary to diagnose the problem. See help (if necessary) to
find event log.

Also perform a quick check of the Device Manager just to
verify no defects were detected by the system.

A responsible computer manufacturer provides a comprehensive
set of diagnostics for the machine. If not provided, then you
must download and execute those diagnostics from each
component manufacturer. Especially important is the memory
diagnostic such as by Docmem or Memtst86. Run a memory
diagnostic first at normal cooler temperatures. Then repeat
the same diagnostics with memory chips heated by hairdryer on
high. That heated memory is quite normal temperature to
semiconductors (see data sheets if you doubt it). But
defective memory becomes more obviously defective when hot.
So heat it to temperatures that to you is uncomfortable to
touch. Good memory works just fine at those temperatures.
Intermittent memory becomes more failure prone and is easier
to detect with a memory diagnostic.

Why do you think others hype fans. They had problems.
Instead of fixing the problems, they cured the symptoms - more
fans. One chassis fan is more than sufficient cooling for
most computers. Two fans is only redundancy. Heat is also a
tool to assist diagnostics in finding intermittent defects.

Get diagnostics for those other system components. Notice
we first verify hardware integrity before even looking at or
suspecting Windows or software.

Meanwhile, buying a second power supply is usually wasted
money advocated by those who don't first collect facts. The
integrity of the power supply and other components of a power
supply 'system' are better checked in two minutes using a 3.5
digit multimeter. Yes, you replaced a power supply but other
components of the original power supply system remain. Not
that this would be a reasons for your problem. Some
procedures to see if both supplies are (were) good
accomplished in but 2 minutes:
"Computer doesnt start at all" in alt.comp.hardware on 10
Jan 2004 at
http://tinyurl.com/2t69q and
"I think my power supply is dead" in alt.comp.hardware on 5
Feb 2004 at
http://www.tinyurl.com/2musa

However in two minutes by only recording voltages (on red,
orange and yellow wires), you will probably discover power
supply system is and always was OK.

One last thing. Write down what you see. Numbers in that
original message that may have better identified what to look
for. But you did not record those numbers. Numbers that mean
nothing to you might have accurately answered your question in
a first shot. Collect facts. Fixing the problem comes later
once we have identified a real suspect - and not wildly start
replacing power supplies only because some Uncle Ned did that
previously.

Even if the collected data means nothing to you, that data
does provide those who 'answer without speculation' the
necessary tools to therefore bother to reply. Currently the
information as provided got previous responses of same
integrity.

Jabba wrote:
> I was merrily using my PC when suddenly it gave me a blue screen
> of death. This is what it said
>
> DRIVER_IRQL_NOT_LESS_OR_EQUAL
>
> There was more stuff though unfortunately I've forgotten it now.
>
> So I restart and it wont even get to the post screen and the
> motherboard is beeping. It's a constant beeping, about a 1 second
> long beep followed by approximately a 1 second pause and then
> beeps again - and it does this continuously.
>
> So after lots of restarting, turning off and leaving for a while
> then trying again, it went to the BIOS page and under the CPU
> settings it said something like your CPU is running too fast...
>
> From what I've read when looking up this problem it seems it could
> be a power problem (or at least that is what people have said on
> forums).
>
> I tried another power supply but I still get the beeping and no
> post screen. MY LCD monitor doesn't even appear to be getting a
> signal.
>
> I pulled out my RAM and still got the same beeping so I guess the
> problem occurs before a RAM check is made.
>
> My motherboard is an ASUS A7V8-X. My CPU IS an AMD 2600+
Related resources
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
August 19, 2005 7:01:28 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

Jabba wrote:
> Hi,
>
> I was merrily using my PC when suddenly it gave me a blue screen of death.
> This is what it said
>
> DRIVER_IRQL_NOT_LESS_OR_EQUAL
>
> There was more stuff though unfortunately I've forgotten it now.
>
> So I restart and it wont even get to the post screen and the motherboard is
> beeping. It's a constant beeping, about a 1 second long beep followed by
> approximately a 1 second pause and then beeps again - and it does this
> continuously.
>
> So after lots of restarting, turning off and leaving for a while then trying
> again, it went to the BIOS page and under the CPU settings it said something
> like your CPU is running too fast...
>
> From what I've read when looking up this problem it seems it could be a
> power problem (or at least that is what people have said on forums).
>
> I tried another power supply but I still get the beeping and no post screen.
> MY LCD monitor doesn't even appear to be getting a signal.
>
> I pulled out my RAM and still got the same beeping so I guess the problem
> occurs before a RAM check is made.
>
> My motherboard is an ASUS A7V8-X. My CPU IS an AMD 2600+
>
> Any help much appreciated!
>
> --
> Jabba
>
>
Check the MB for any leaking or bulging capacitors.

Bob
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
August 19, 2005 7:01:28 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

hmm this seems to be a pretty stubborn problem..
Power is fine..
ram seems fine..

Can you test video card?
the beep codes are a good indicator that your MB is fine.. but follow
Bob M's Advice and look for anything odd about it.. Bad Caps, or
anything that doesn't look like it was when it was original..

107C? no processor can stand that temp..thats 224F.. you could boil
water on your CPU..if thats 107F.. thats 41C.. and thats fine...
but if it really is 107C or close.. then that leads me to belive your
CPU fan failed and you toasted your CPU.. (would also give you a
repeating beep code)
80+C is BAD - Crispy critter in seconds...

if your program wasn't set up right and had a variation of 25C or more
is rather hard to belive.

im really hopin thats F and not C...

as for the ram test.. even if you had 2 sticks or 20.. if they were in
that computer, then you should test a ram error with them.. you should
use an outside stick to test it just to make sure its not a ram error..
cause if your 2 are bad.. then in or out you will get the same error..
so thats why ya need that outside chip that you know is good..


------------------------------------------
I was gonna save this till after we checked everything else but if
those temps are really Celcius.. then you'll need to take a look at
your processor...

now im sure you have some experience in system building and
heatsink/CPU interfacing... If not.. Stop now and find a local friend
or shop that will remove, test, and reinstall your CPU properly for
you..

---Do it your self method, If you had someone else build this system
for you and you never built a system before.. then get them to help
you..
If you think your Ready for this, proceed at your own risk, all Im
doing is advising, if you have some experience in this then you should
know what do you, I'm just gonna mark of the steps that have special
details about them. If your proceeding on your own and you've not done
this alot.. good luck you can cause more harm then good if you dont do
this right.. you were warned..

--before you do this.. get some replacement thermal compound, and
thermal compound remover... www.articsilver.com (Get thier remover and
compounds.. best i've ever used) Artic silver 5 is fantastic stuff..
more on use later..---

Attach your Anti-static strap (if you use one.. if you dont then do
what i do when i dont have mine and keep your arm or hand on the case
at all times to stay grounded)
disconnect everything..
Now your choice, you can remove the MB from the case and put on a
clean, level, static free suface, or you can leave it in there like i
do and go from there..
Remove the Heatsink carefully, it might stick a little (due to Thermal
pad) unless it really did get too hot inside and melted to your
Heatsink (seen it happen... not pretty)

Once that is off you can see your CPU and can tell if it looks ok or
not.. Look at your core directly and if there is any compound on it or
if you see the core directly, and any of it is black.. not a good
sign.. (either dirt from a loose HS or cooked core). Look at every area
of the CPU and Heatsink..


if all looks ok.. then remove the CPU put on a clean, level,
Static-free surface and clean it off with the Thermal Cleaner, (read
the instuctions and follow to the letter) also clean the bottom of the
heatsink (inspect that too for the sneaky black spots).

While the CPU is removed from the MB now is a great time to inspect the
entire area around the CPU for any signs of heat damage.. look at it
completly for anything odd.. compare to pictures of your exact board on
the web.. if anything looks a little off, then you might have a larger
issue at hand, but I personally belive your MB is ok.

If all is well, then reapply thermal to the Heatsink and CPU then
reinstall..
Remember,, VERY THIN Layer of Compound on the Core only for the CPU..
And remember the finger in a bag trick for re-applying to the
Heatsink.. (put a little compound on the bottom of HS, put your finger
in a clean plastic bag, press the compound with a twisting motion into
it, wipe away any excess.. you should see the compound in the "pores"
of the bottom of the HS.) Compound is a gap filler so alot isn't good
but too little isn't good either..

Re-install and move up to a barebone trouble-shooting setup..... (MB,
CPU, VID, RAM)

well if you did all that and your CPU, your Video card, and you MB look
fine visablly but you still get that beep code.. then there is a much
more serious issue..

if your getting tired of messin with this thing.. I know Best Buy does
full Diagnostics for 60$.. call them first and see what they are
willing to do.. They dont give time-tables for repairs, and if they do,
dont hold them to it.. its a retail enviroment.. just call and check up
on them and see hows it going.. they are good at calling when done with
diags normally..


your problem isn't uncommon, just hard to diagnose without looking
directly at it.
August 19, 2005 7:45:27 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

Thanks for the reply.

"Sparex" <Spare.parts@cox.net> wrote in message
news:1124462233.118960.295330@g44g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> hmm well the good news is - your MB is ok..but I think you probally
> already knew that.. now the bad part... Your ram might be toast... and
> your system might of overheated..
>

I hope my ram isnt toast - I have two sticks of it. Plus I get the same
beep code regardless of whether the RAM is in or not so I thought it might
be a problem with something before the RAM check is made?

My system does have a problem with overheating - it once got as high as
107ºC supposedly (not sure how much faith I put in the temp reading program)
and qute often crashed as a result (I believe overheating to be the cause) -
the crashes only ever happened during gaming though.

At the moment my system is cool and the one time I managed to get into the
BIOS the CPU temp was reported at 32ºC - I have all the sides off my case
too at the moment.

> <snip>

> BTW did a reasearch on that BSOD stop error message. Microsoft says its
> a driver issue but many fourms also relay it to Overclocking, dunno if
> you are or not but the issue with OC is heat.. so if you Troubleshoot
> all the issues around your heat problems and still get that error.. you
> may need some driver, bios, and other updates..

I'm not doing any overclocking.

The problem is I'm not in the position to do any updates as I can't even get
to the POST screen...

I will try the RAM in diff slots to see if I get any changes in beep code.

Thanks for your help!
August 19, 2005 8:01:00 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

The problem is I cannot access anything (BIOS, device manager etc) because
the computer cannot even reach the POST screen - the monitor isn't picking
up a signal.


"w_tom" <w_tom1@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:4305F005.3EBF6FD7@hotmail.com...
> Many people will say it is this or that. IOW they are
> guessing. They are also expert automobile mechanics. Worse
> still, they will not even say WHY it is this or that which
> means wild speculation.
>
> If somehow the BIOS got changed, then reset the BIOS to
> defaults ... AFTER recording what was originally in that
> BIOS. Some BIOS defaults are intentionally different to
> correct hardware incompatibility problems. Always record all
> previously information before changing anything.
>
> Try swapping memory SIMMs to get the machine to boot. If
> swapping solves a booting problem, then one of those SIMMs is
> probably defective.
>
> A long list of reasons that could create the failure. So we
> don't yet even worry about fixing the problem. First we must
> understand it. For starters, what does the error message
> say. Many will just say to do this when you get that
> message. IOW they speculate. But the message suggests a
> computer program tried to access memory that was illegal to
> access. So why did program do that? Memory error? Defective
> software? We don't know from what you have reported. So we
> move on to collecting relevant facts - and don't yet try to
> fix anything.
>
> What does the Event (system) log report? Was this due to a
> problem that your system had seen previously and had
> previously worked around? Information from Event log is
> necessary to diagnose the problem. See help (if necessary) to
> find event log.
>
> Also perform a quick check of the Device Manager just to
> verify no defects were detected by the system.
>
> A responsible computer manufacturer provides a comprehensive
> set of diagnostics for the machine. If not provided, then you
> must download and execute those diagnostics from each
> component manufacturer. Especially important is the memory
> diagnostic such as by Docmem or Memtst86. Run a memory
> diagnostic first at normal cooler temperatures. Then repeat
> the same diagnostics with memory chips heated by hairdryer on
> high. That heated memory is quite normal temperature to
> semiconductors (see data sheets if you doubt it). But
> defective memory becomes more obviously defective when hot.
> So heat it to temperatures that to you is uncomfortable to
> touch. Good memory works just fine at those temperatures.
> Intermittent memory becomes more failure prone and is easier
> to detect with a memory diagnostic.
>
> Why do you think others hype fans. They had problems.
> Instead of fixing the problems, they cured the symptoms - more
> fans. One chassis fan is more than sufficient cooling for
> most computers. Two fans is only redundancy. Heat is also a
> tool to assist diagnostics in finding intermittent defects.
>
> Get diagnostics for those other system components. Notice
> we first verify hardware integrity before even looking at or
> suspecting Windows or software.
>
> Meanwhile, buying a second power supply is usually wasted
> money advocated by those who don't first collect facts. The
> integrity of the power supply and other components of a power
> supply 'system' are better checked in two minutes using a 3.5
> digit multimeter. Yes, you replaced a power supply but other
> components of the original power supply system remain. Not
> that this would be a reasons for your problem. Some
> procedures to see if both supplies are (were) good
> accomplished in but 2 minutes:
> "Computer doesnt start at all" in alt.comp.hardware on 10
> Jan 2004 at
> http://tinyurl.com/2t69q and
> "I think my power supply is dead" in alt.comp.hardware on 5
> Feb 2004 at
> http://www.tinyurl.com/2musa
>
> However in two minutes by only recording voltages (on red,
> orange and yellow wires), you will probably discover power
> supply system is and always was OK.
>
> One last thing. Write down what you see. Numbers in that
> original message that may have better identified what to look
> for. But you did not record those numbers. Numbers that mean
> nothing to you might have accurately answered your question in
> a first shot. Collect facts. Fixing the problem comes later
> once we have identified a real suspect - and not wildly start
> replacing power supplies only because some Uncle Ned did that
> previously.
>
> Even if the collected data means nothing to you, that data
> does provide those who 'answer without speculation' the
> necessary tools to therefore bother to reply. Currently the
> information as provided got previous responses of same
> integrity.
>
> Jabba wrote:
>> I was merrily using my PC when suddenly it gave me a blue screen
>> of death. This is what it said
>>
>> DRIVER_IRQL_NOT_LESS_OR_EQUAL
>>
>> There was more stuff though unfortunately I've forgotten it now.
>>
>> So I restart and it wont even get to the post screen and the
>> motherboard is beeping. It's a constant beeping, about a 1 second
>> long beep followed by approximately a 1 second pause and then
>> beeps again - and it does this continuously.
>>
>> So after lots of restarting, turning off and leaving for a while
>> then trying again, it went to the BIOS page and under the CPU
>> settings it said something like your CPU is running too fast...
>>
>> From what I've read when looking up this problem it seems it could
>> be a power problem (or at least that is what people have said on
>> forums).
>>
>> I tried another power supply but I still get the beeping and no
>> post screen. MY LCD monitor doesn't even appear to be getting a
>> signal.
>>
>> I pulled out my RAM and still got the same beeping so I guess the
>> problem occurs before a RAM check is made.
>>
>> My motherboard is an ASUS A7V8-X. My CPU IS an AMD 2600+
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
August 19, 2005 8:01:01 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

Jabba wrote:
> The problem is I cannot access anything (BIOS, device manager etc)
> because the computer cannot even reach the POST screen - the
> monitor isn't picking up a signal.

Then first required are numbers from the power supply.
Without a good foundation, no computer will work properly. If
necessary, strip the computer down to it simplest functions.
Remove video, keyboard, mouse, memory, disk connections -
everything but power supply, motherboard, CPU, and speaker.
If motherboard does anything useful, then it will sound a beep
code complaining about the missing memory. If it does not
issue that beep code (and power supply voltages are in upper
3/4 limits of table provided in that previous discussion),
then you know one of those items (except power supply) is
defective.

If proper beep code is issued, then you can return
components one at a time.
August 19, 2005 8:46:27 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

"w_tom" <w_tom1@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:4305FBB6.3022D4E9@hotmail.com...

> Then first required are numbers from the power supply.
> Without a good foundation, no computer will work properly. If
> necessary, strip the computer down to it simplest functions.
> Remove video, keyboard, mouse, memory, disk connections -
> everything but power supply, motherboard, CPU, and speaker.
> If motherboard does anything useful, then it will sound a beep
> code complaining about the missing memory. If it does not
> issue that beep code (and power supply voltages are in upper
> 3/4 limits of table provided in that previous discussion),
> then you know one of those items (except power supply) is
> defective.
>
> If proper beep code is issued, then you can return
> components one at a time.

I've taken out all the ram and I get the same beep code as before

beeeep........beeeep........beeeep........beeeep........beeeep........beeeep

each beep lasts 1 second, each pause lasts 1 second.

The problem is not with the RAM

cheers
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
August 19, 2005 11:32:14 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

"Bob M" <ram1220@vzavenue.net> wrote in message
news:yeCdnVMZdet1iJveRVn-sQ@texas.net...
> Jabba wrote:
> > Hi,
> >
> > I was merrily using my PC when suddenly it gave me a blue screen of
death.
> > This is what it said
> >
> > DRIVER_IRQL_NOT_LESS_OR_EQUAL
> >
> > There was more stuff though unfortunately I've forgotten it now.
> >
> > So I restart and it wont even get to the post screen and the motherboard
is
> > beeping. It's a constant beeping, about a 1 second long beep followed
by
> > approximately a 1 second pause and then beeps again - and it does this
> > continuously.
> >
> > So after lots of restarting, turning off and leaving for a while then
trying
> > again, it went to the BIOS page and under the CPU settings it said
something
> > like your CPU is running too fast...
> >
> > From what I've read when looking up this problem it seems it could be a
> > power problem (or at least that is what people have said on forums).
> >
> > I tried another power supply but I still get the beeping and no post
screen.
> > MY LCD monitor doesn't even appear to be getting a signal.
> >
> > I pulled out my RAM and still got the same beeping so I guess the
problem
> > occurs before a RAM check is made.
> >
> > My motherboard is an ASUS A7V8-X. My CPU IS an AMD 2600+
> >
> > Any help much appreciated!
> >
> > --
> > Jabba
> >
> >
> Check the MB for any leaking or bulging capacitors.
>
> Bob

If RAM tests Ok elsewhere, and PSU OK, Motherboard is prime suspect,
memory controller is not working if good memory not detected in any slot.
Mike.
August 20, 2005 1:16:59 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

cheers for your help!

I went out and bought a new Motherboard - this one actually boots now so I
guess the old motherboard was bust! Oh well, its the first time I've had one
die on me so I guess I've been pretty lucky all this time.

I'm now dealing with a different BSOD

0x0000007B

Hopefully I should be able to sort this with a repair of XP!!

Sometimes computers are just too much work!

"Sparex" <Spare.parts@cox.net> wrote in message
news:1124475485.399395.301850@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com...
> hmm this seems to be a pretty stubborn problem..
> Power is fine..
> ram seems fine..
>
> Can you test video card?
> the beep codes are a good indicator that your MB is fine.. but follow
> Bob M's Advice and look for anything odd about it.. Bad Caps, or
> anything that doesn't look like it was when it was original..
>
> 107C? no processor can stand that temp..thats 224F.. you could boil
> water on your CPU..if thats 107F.. thats 41C.. and thats fine...
> but if it really is 107C or close.. then that leads me to belive your
> CPU fan failed and you toasted your CPU.. (would also give you a
> repeating beep code)
> 80+C is BAD - Crispy critter in seconds...
>
> if your program wasn't set up right and had a variation of 25C or more
> is rather hard to belive.
>
> im really hopin thats F and not C...
>
> as for the ram test.. even if you had 2 sticks or 20.. if they were in
> that computer, then you should test a ram error with them.. you should
> use an outside stick to test it just to make sure its not a ram error..
> cause if your 2 are bad.. then in or out you will get the same error..
> so thats why ya need that outside chip that you know is good..
>
>
> ------------------------------------------
> I was gonna save this till after we checked everything else but if
> those temps are really Celcius.. then you'll need to take a look at
> your processor...
>
> now im sure you have some experience in system building and
> heatsink/CPU interfacing... If not.. Stop now and find a local friend
> or shop that will remove, test, and reinstall your CPU properly for
> you..
>
> ---Do it your self method, If you had someone else build this system
> for you and you never built a system before.. then get them to help
> you..
> If you think your Ready for this, proceed at your own risk, all Im
> doing is advising, if you have some experience in this then you should
> know what do you, I'm just gonna mark of the steps that have special
> details about them. If your proceeding on your own and you've not done
> this alot.. good luck you can cause more harm then good if you dont do
> this right.. you were warned..
>
> --before you do this.. get some replacement thermal compound, and
> thermal compound remover... www.articsilver.com (Get thier remover and
> compounds.. best i've ever used) Artic silver 5 is fantastic stuff..
> more on use later..---
>
> Attach your Anti-static strap (if you use one.. if you dont then do
> what i do when i dont have mine and keep your arm or hand on the case
> at all times to stay grounded)
> disconnect everything..
> Now your choice, you can remove the MB from the case and put on a
> clean, level, static free suface, or you can leave it in there like i
> do and go from there..
> Remove the Heatsink carefully, it might stick a little (due to Thermal
> pad) unless it really did get too hot inside and melted to your
> Heatsink (seen it happen... not pretty)
>
> Once that is off you can see your CPU and can tell if it looks ok or
> not.. Look at your core directly and if there is any compound on it or
> if you see the core directly, and any of it is black.. not a good
> sign.. (either dirt from a loose HS or cooked core). Look at every area
> of the CPU and Heatsink..
>
>
> if all looks ok.. then remove the CPU put on a clean, level,
> Static-free surface and clean it off with the Thermal Cleaner, (read
> the instuctions and follow to the letter) also clean the bottom of the
> heatsink (inspect that too for the sneaky black spots).
>
> While the CPU is removed from the MB now is a great time to inspect the
> entire area around the CPU for any signs of heat damage.. look at it
> completly for anything odd.. compare to pictures of your exact board on
> the web.. if anything looks a little off, then you might have a larger
> issue at hand, but I personally belive your MB is ok.
>
> If all is well, then reapply thermal to the Heatsink and CPU then
> reinstall..
> Remember,, VERY THIN Layer of Compound on the Core only for the CPU..
> And remember the finger in a bag trick for re-applying to the
> Heatsink.. (put a little compound on the bottom of HS, put your finger
> in a clean plastic bag, press the compound with a twisting motion into
> it, wipe away any excess.. you should see the compound in the "pores"
> of the bottom of the HS.) Compound is a gap filler so alot isn't good
> but too little isn't good either..
>
> Re-install and move up to a barebone trouble-shooting setup..... (MB,
> CPU, VID, RAM)
>
> well if you did all that and your CPU, your Video card, and you MB look
> fine visablly but you still get that beep code.. then there is a much
> more serious issue..
>
> if your getting tired of messin with this thing.. I know Best Buy does
> full Diagnostics for 60$.. call them first and see what they are
> willing to do.. They dont give time-tables for repairs, and if they do,
> dont hold them to it.. its a retail enviroment.. just call and check up
> on them and see hows it going.. they are good at calling when done with
> diags normally..
>
>
> your problem isn't uncommon, just hard to diagnose without looking
> directly at it.
>
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
August 20, 2005 3:31:06 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

Jabba wrote:

> Hi,
>
> I was merrily using my PC when suddenly it gave me a blue screen of death.
> This is what it said
>
> DRIVER_IRQL_NOT_LESS_OR_EQUAL
>
> There was more stuff though unfortunately I've forgotten it now.
>
> So I restart and it wont even get to the post screen and the motherboard is
> beeping. It's a constant beeping, about a 1 second long beep followed by
> approximately a 1 second pause and then beeps again - and it does this
> continuously.
>
> So after lots of restarting, turning off and leaving for a while then trying
> again, it went to the BIOS page and under the CPU settings it said something
> like your CPU is running too fast...
>
> From what I've read when looking up this problem it seems it could be a
> power problem (or at least that is what people have said on forums).
>
> I tried another power supply but I still get the beeping and no post screen.
> MY LCD monitor doesn't even appear to be getting a signal.
>
> I pulled out my RAM and still got the same beeping so I guess the problem
> occurs before a RAM check is made.
>
> My motherboard is an ASUS A7V8-X. My CPU IS an AMD 2600+
>
> Any help much appreciated!

Award BIOS continuous beeping indicates a memory problem and so does the
"DRIVER_IRQL_NOT_LESS_OR_EQUAL."
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
August 20, 2005 1:04:10 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

well glad you got it fixed, and really glad it wasn't the CPU.. it was
a pesky problem and if it was memory and yet the MB acted like it was
and turned out to be the MB then that leaves the MB's Ram controller
(or Northbridge was deftive/shot) either way..
Glad you got that fixed..

a Repair of XP will fix that, shouldn't take more than 10 mins =)

Congrats on a working system.. watch those temps and keep it clean
inside and you'll be running strong for a long time..
!