Leave a Pentium 630 running 24/7?

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

Is it advisable to leave a computer with a Prescott chip running 24
hours a day? Have a Compaq 5000 with an 866 Pentium and it has never
been turned off in the past five years. Ran across this article and it
makes me wonder. . .

CPU Temperature vs Life Expectancy
http://www.overclockers.com/tips30/

Right now the chip is 66.5 C / 151.2 F and motherboard is 46 C / 114 F

ASUS P5WD2 with Intel CPU Fan
Pentium 630
Coolermaster Wavemaster
Enermax Noisetaker 420W
Jetway X300LE

Thanks for reading this -
10 answers Last reply
More about leave pentium running
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    if your going to do so. some sort of power management should be used. having
    the optical drives spun up and HDDs spinning would be a waste of power and
    definitely cause premature failing. unfortunately allot of hardware/drivers
    won't / don't support hibernation/or even standby, causing a freeze when
    going into or out of power save mode.


    "Joe" <Joe@.noemail> wrote in message
    news:9bfqi1hkaak3phptodf04lifgm7ko0adfn@4ax.com...
    >
    > Is it advisable to leave a computer with a Prescott chip running 24
    > hours a day? Have a Compaq 5000 with an 866 Pentium and it has never
    > been turned off in the past five years. Ran across this article and it
    > makes me wonder. . .
    >
    > CPU Temperature vs Life Expectancy
    > http://www.overclockers.com/tips30/
    >
    > Right now the chip is 66.5 C / 151.2 F and motherboard is 46 C / 114 F
    >
    > ASUS P5WD2 with Intel CPU Fan
    > Pentium 630
    > Coolermaster Wavemaster
    > Enermax Noisetaker 420W
    > Jetway X300LE
    >
    > Thanks for reading this -
  2. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "Joe" <Joe@.noemail> wrote in message
    news:9bfqi1hkaak3phptodf04lifgm7ko0adfn@4ax.com...
    >
    > Is it advisable to leave a computer with a Prescott chip running 24
    > hours a day? Have a Compaq 5000 with an 866 Pentium and it has never
    > been turned off in the past five years. Ran across this article and it
    > makes me wonder. . .
    >
    > CPU Temperature vs Life Expectancy
    > http://www.overclockers.com/tips30/
    >
    > Right now the chip is 66.5 C / 151.2 F and motherboard is 46 C / 114 F
    >
    > ASUS P5WD2 with Intel CPU Fan
    > Pentium 630
    > Coolermaster Wavemaster
    > Enermax Noisetaker 420W
    > Jetway X300LE
    >
    > Thanks for reading this -

    Even for the I-6xx chips, that is a bit warm. Mine was idling in the mid-low
    50s and I corrected it by tinkering with my case airflow. It now idles at
    38-42C and under load at 58-60C. I use the Intel stock HS/Fan. A lot depends
    on your ambient (room) temps too. My problem ended up being a fan in the top
    of the case was interfering with good airflow across the HS. I took that fan
    out and my temps went down considerably. Correctly mounting the S775 HS can
    also be tricky. I always secure the tightners by tightening one corner then
    the opposite corner then repeat for the other two. It is also very easy to
    break the little retainers if you remove and try and reinstall the HS/Fan.
    If you had to remove the HS at any time, you may have broken one of them and
    one of the corners of the HS is not making good contact with the processor.
    I tend to feel that your airflow in not adequate because your MB temps are a
    good 12-14C higher than mine too. At idle, mine are 31-32C steady. My main
    computer room is at 72f all the time. If yours is 10degs+ f above that, then
    your temps would be normal.........:-) Good luck.

    Ed
  3. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Joe writes:

    > Is it advisable to leave a computer with a Prescott chip running 24
    > hours a day?

    You can operate any computer 24 hours a day without any trouble, as
    long as it is operating within its nominal temperature range. There's
    nothing special about Prescott chips that changes this.

    > Have a Compaq 5000 with an 866 Pentium and it has never
    > been turned off in the past five years.

    It may run for another fifteen years or beyond. The most likely
    failure is a fan or disk drive, not the CPU.

    > Ran across this article and it
    > makes me wonder. . .
    >
    > CPU Temperature vs Life Expectancy
    > http://www.overclockers.com/tips30/

    But it's on an overclocker site, isn't it? If you go outside the
    manufacturer's specs, all bets are off.

    --
    Transpose mxsmanic and gmail to reach me by e-mail.
  4. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    The thermal limit of that CPU is 70 C, so you are running almost at the
    limit. I would turn it off overnight to let it cool off.

    --
    DaveW
    __________

    "Joe" <Joe@.noemail> wrote in message
    news:9bfqi1hkaak3phptodf04lifgm7ko0adfn@4ax.com...
    >
    > Is it advisable to leave a computer with a Prescott chip running 24
    > hours a day? Have a Compaq 5000 with an 866 Pentium and it has never
    > been turned off in the past five years. Ran across this article and it
    > makes me wonder. . .
    >
    > CPU Temperature vs Life Expectancy
    > http://www.overclockers.com/tips30/
    >
    > Right now the chip is 66.5 C / 151.2 F and motherboard is 46 C / 114 F
    >
    > ASUS P5WD2 with Intel CPU Fan
    > Pentium 630
    > Coolermaster Wavemaster
    > Enermax Noisetaker 420W
    > Jetway X300LE
    >
    > Thanks for reading this -
  5. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Joe wrote:
    > Is it advisable to leave a computer with a Prescott chip running 24
    > hours a day? Have a Compaq 5000 with an 866 Pentium and it has never
    > been turned off in the past five years. Ran across this article and it
    > makes me wonder. . .
    >
    > CPU Temperature vs Life Expectancy
    > http://www.overclockers.com/tips30/
    >
    > Right now the chip is 66.5 C / 151.2 F and motherboard is 46 C / 114 F
    >
    > ASUS P5WD2 with Intel CPU Fan
    > Pentium 630
    > Coolermaster Wavemaster
    > Enermax Noisetaker 420W
    > Jetway X300LE
    >
    > Thanks for reading this -

    Thermal cycling (when you turn the computer on and off) puts stress on
    the components as well. If you want to leave it on (worse for the
    environment due to power consumption), leave it on. The cost of running
    the computer 24/7/365 is probably more than it'll be worth in a year's
    time. So, it's neither advisable nor inadvisable: do what you want.

    --
    spammage trappage: remove the underscores to reply

    I'm going to die rather sooner than I'd like. I tried to protect my
    neighbours from crime, and became the victim of it. Complications in
    hospital following this resulted in a serious illness. I now need a bone
    marrow transplant. Many people around the world are waiting for a marrow
    transplant, too. Please volunteer to be a marrow donor:
    http://www.abmdr.org.au/
    http://www.marrow.org/
  6. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    JAD writes:

    > having
    > the optical drives spun up and HDDs spinning would be a waste of power and
    > definitely cause premature failing.

    Not so. Hard disk drives can run 24 hours a day indefinitely; running
    them continuously doesn't reduce the number of hours they will
    survive. While spinning a drive puts wear and tear on it, so does
    starting and stopping it (a lot).

    --
    Transpose mxsmanic and gmail to reach me by e-mail.
  7. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    your not serious? bearing failure makes up 80%+ of hard drive failure. Roms
    are priced and made 'disposable' these days, and letting them spin, is
    asking for them to die. Although a 'load' is put on the PSU during spinup, I
    don't think that out weighs the 24/7 spinning of the bearings. Use =
    friction/wear. 'definitely may have been 'strong' , 'contributes' may
    have been a better choice of words. I personally don't set
    'standby/hibernate' to begin in >2 hrs of idle time.


    "Mxsmanic" <mxsmanic@gmail.com> wrote in message
    news:rm8ri1trsp7ug8km1kshprggdcoidg2d7e@4ax.com...
    > JAD writes:
    >
    > > having
    > > the optical drives spun up and HDDs spinning would be a waste of power
    and
    > > definitely cause premature failing.
    >
    > Not so. Hard disk drives can run 24 hours a day indefinitely; running
    > them continuously doesn't reduce the number of hours they will
    > survive. While spinning a drive puts wear and tear on it, so does
    > starting and stopping it (a lot).
    >
    > --
    > Transpose mxsmanic and gmail to reach me by e-mail.
  8. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    JAD writes:

    > your not serious? bearing failure makes up 80%+ of hard drive failure.

    All the failures I've encountered on disk drives have been media
    failures or head/actuator failures. Bearings will eventually fail,
    but usually not before something else fails. And if one starts and
    stops the disk regularly, one nearly guarantees that something else
    will fail first.

    > Although a 'load' is put on the PSU during spinup, I
    > don't think that out weighs the 24/7 spinning of the bearings.

    More importantly, a load is put on the media and the heads, and they
    will start to wear out after enough cycles.

    --
    Transpose mxsmanic and gmail to reach me by e-mail.
  9. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Others are confronting Mxsmanic's speculations.
    Speculations? Yes. He cannot provide any technical reasons,
    numbers, or citations for his claims. Somehow he just knows

    One lowest number for power cycling I ever saw was on an IBM
    disk drive - 40,000. That means power cycling seven times
    every day (including holidays) for .... 15 years. Yes, power
    cycling is destructive. And then we replace the Daily News
    tabloid version with reality - the numbers. Seven times every
    day for *15 years* means, for all practical purposes, that
    power cycling is only destructive in myths and half truth
    reasoning (also called propaganda).

    Bearing failure is a significant reason for failure.
    Bearing failure is due to hours of operation - not due to
    power cycling. As in most myths about 'destructive power
    cycling', the purveyor does not even provide manufacturer data
    sheet numbers. Hours of operation is often a reason for
    failures - not power cycling, not mythical transients, and not
    the so many other things promoted by junk science reasoning.

    Note reasons provided by Mxsmanic. He observed things. He
    did not bother to learn why things failed. Did not repair
    failed component inside the drive. Did not learn what
    manufacturers numbers said. Did not demand numbers. Failed
    to first ask so many "Whys?" Instead he just knows only from
    personal observation followed by personal speculation.
    Definitive conclusions based only upon a hypothesis or
    speculation - and no numbers - is classic junk science
    reasoning.

    Mxsmanic wrote:
    > JAD writes:
    >> your not serious? bearing failure makes up 80%+ of hard drive failure.
    >
    > All the failures I've encountered on disk drives have been media
    > failures or head/actuator failures. Bearings will eventually fail,
    > but usually not before something else fails. And if one starts and
    > stops the disk regularly, one nearly guarantees that something else
    > will fail first.
    >
    >> Although a 'load' is put on the PSU during spinup, I
    >> don't think that out weighs the 24/7 spinning of the bearings.
    >
    > More importantly, a load is put on the media and the heads, and they
    > will start to wear out after enough cycles.
  10. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    JAD wrote:
    > your not serious?

    There's your and you're: spot the difference and win wonderful prizes!

    > bearing failure makes up 80%+ of hard drive failure.

    1. Source?
    2. Source attributing it direcly to leaving the drives spinning?

    > Roms
    > are priced and made 'disposable' these days, and letting them spin, is
    > asking for them to die. Although a 'load' is put on the PSU during spinup, I
    > don't think that out weighs the 24/7 spinning of the bearings. Use =
    > friction/wear. 'definitely may have been 'strong' , 'contributes' may
    > have been a better choice of words. I personally don't set
    > 'standby/hibernate' to begin in >2 hrs of idle time.
    >
    >
    > "Mxsmanic" <mxsmanic@gmail.com> wrote in message
    > news:rm8ri1trsp7ug8km1kshprggdcoidg2d7e@4ax.com...
    >
    >>JAD writes:
    >>
    >>
    >>>having
    >>>the optical drives spun up and HDDs spinning would be a waste of power
    >
    > and
    >
    >>>definitely cause premature failing.
    >>
    >>Not so. Hard disk drives can run 24 hours a day indefinitely; running
    >>them continuously doesn't reduce the number of hours they will
    >>survive. While spinning a drive puts wear and tear on it, so does
    >>starting and stopping it (a lot).
    >>
    >>--
    >>Transpose mxsmanic and gmail to reach me by e-mail.
    >
    >
    >


    --
    spammage trappage: remove the underscores to reply

    I'm going to die rather sooner than I'd like. I tried to protect my
    neighbours from crime, and became the victim of it. Complications in
    hospital following this resulted in a serious illness. I now need a bone
    marrow transplant. Many people around the world are waiting for a marrow
    transplant, too. Please volunteer to be a marrow donor:
    http://www.abmdr.org.au/
    http://www.marrow.org/
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