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Installed XP twice- hdd full

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Anonymous
August 10, 2004 5:57:01 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Okay, I admit that this was very stupid but I couldn't get Windows to start
one day. So I reinstalled XP. I thought that it would give me the option to
repair instead on reinstall somewhere along the way but it didn't. So now my
computer is working but it is very low on memory and I'm guessing that its
from the info that was left from before. But now I can't access those files.
If anyone could help me with step-by-step instructions on how to fix this, I
would really appreciate it. I really do not know much about computers so if I
need to reformat or something like that, please tell me how. Thanks in
advance.

More about : installed hdd full

Anonymous
August 11, 2004 2:05:54 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Hi,

The dual installation would not be causing the low memory problems. The
extra installation just occupies hard drive space, and low memory errors
would only result if you were running out of hard drive space.

First, you can regain the space by deleting the old system folders. You need
to take ownership of them. Right-click the folder, select properties. Go to
the security tab and click advanced. You can take control of the folders on
the owner tab. For the security tab to appear in a WinXP Pro system, you
must disable simple file sharing in the control panel/folder options/view
tab. For a WinXP Home system, you must restart in safe mode and logon as
administrator. More details here:

HOW TO: Take Ownership of a File or Folder in Windows XP [Q308421]
http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=308421

As to the low memory problems, do you have Intel Application Accelerator
installed? If so, you need to uninstall it and install the latest version.
The older ones are incompatible with WinXP and can cause this error message.

If not, then try this: Go to System properties/advanced/performance
settings/advanced tab/virtual memory change and disable the swap file.
Reboot. Delete all instances of pagefile.sys from all drives should any
exist, then reverse the original steps and reenable the swap file. Reboot
once more to finish. See if this helps,

--
Best of Luck,

Rick Rogers, aka "Nutcase" - Microsoft MVP
http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/
Associate Expert - WindowsXP Expert Zone
www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone
Windows help - www.rickrogers.org

"littlebit_202" <littlebit_202@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:3668AC20-F9C8-4E89-A668-1D9BAD751476@microsoft.com...
> Okay, I admit that this was very stupid but I couldn't get Windows to
> start
> one day. So I reinstalled XP. I thought that it would give me the option
> to
> repair instead on reinstall somewhere along the way but it didn't. So now
> my
> computer is working but it is very low on memory and I'm guessing that its
> from the info that was left from before. But now I can't access those
> files.
> If anyone could help me with step-by-step instructions on how to fix this,
> I
> would really appreciate it. I really do not know much about computers so
> if I
> need to reformat or something like that, please tell me how. Thanks in
> advance.
Anonymous
September 5, 2004 11:07:02 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

This is not stupid...I suspect many people reinstall with problems

First of all, it's better to install a fresh copy over a clean drive. In
other words, use either a utility or the DOS prompt to clean the drive (write
"zero's" to the drive), and then install the OS. This insures a "clean
install." Note, reformatting a drive is NOT the same thing as writing zero's.
To reformat from DOS, first go to explorer and double click My Computer.
Right click the "A: Floppy Drive" and choose to creat a MS-DOS start up disc.
Use a clean, formatted floppy disc of course. Reboot with the disc in the
drive. At the prompts, you can type in your formatting, deleting commands.

Two, your RAM problem is not a result of the OS reinstallation, rather with
something else. I like "Rick 'Nutcase's'" suggestion of cleaning the page.sys
files; however, there are other things that may be more cupable: viruses,
conflicting versions of programs from the 1st install, spyware, etc. Most of
this is resolved by doing a "clean install."

When you do a clean install, to help maximize the RAM your system does have,
install all your applications after the OS, and after having installed the OS
updates. Then go to >Start>Run and type "msconfig." Choose the checkbox,
"selective startup," choose the "startup" tab, and proceed to uncheck
everything except for antivirus software elements, firewall, and display or
video components. By doing this, you prevent the ridiculous amount of startup
applications that run in the background from your various
applications--things that consume RAM, often without your knowledge.
--MK


"littlebit_202" wrote:

> Okay, I admit that this was very stupid but I couldn't get Windows to start
> one day. So I reinstalled XP. I thought that it would give me the option to
> repair instead on reinstall somewhere along the way but it didn't. So now my
> computer is working but it is very low on memory and I'm guessing that its
> from the info that was left from before. But now I can't access those files.
> If anyone could help me with step-by-step instructions on how to fix this, I
> would really appreciate it. I really do not know much about computers so if I
> need to reformat or something like that, please tell me how. Thanks in
> advance.
Anonymous
September 6, 2004 1:53:02 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

On Sun, 5 Sep 2004 19:07:02 -0700, mjkaiz
<mjkaiz@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:

>This is not stupid...I suspect many people reinstall with problems
>
>First of all, it's better to install a fresh copy over a clean drive. In
>other words, use either a utility or the DOS prompt to clean the drive (write
>"zero's" to the drive), and then install the OS. This insures a "clean
>install." Note, reformatting a drive is NOT the same thing as writing zero's.
>To reformat from DOS, first go to explorer and double click My Computer.
>Right click the "A: Floppy Drive" and choose to creat a MS-DOS start up disc.
>Use a clean, formatted floppy disc of course. Reboot with the disc in the
>drive. At the prompts, you can type in your formatting, deleting commands.

Booting to MSDOS using the Startup floppy created from within XP's
Explorer will not allow you to format your HD, since the floppy does
not contain the command necessary to do the formatting. If you should
desire to install XP from the DOS prompt, you would be better off to
obtain a Windows 9x/ME startup floppy from http://www.bootdisk.com

Donald L McDaniel
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