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Overheating Problem

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November 17, 2005 11:12:54 PM

Hi All

Ok, so about a year ago I built my first PC. I used an Asus P5GDC motherboard and an Intel LGA775 P4/3 GHz CPU.

From the beginning, my CPU ran hot...idled in the high 50's and would get to the high 70's when it was loaded down.

Within the past month, the cooling pefromance has decline. If I'm doing anything computationally intensive, the CPU temp routinely gets to 80 or 81 degrees C which then sets off an alarm.

My case has 4 fans in it so the air flow should be ok.

Has anyone out there experienced this? If so, what is the best solution?

Any suggestions would be appreciated.

More about : overheating problem

November 17, 2005 11:31:31 PM

Cleaning si very important to todays high powered systems.
If you have a vacuum with a blow function, unplug your system, take the side panel off, and take it outside (protected from rain etc) Then use the vacuum to blow all the dust out of the case. Remember the power supply.
Speaking of power supplies, does yours have a large (80mm) fan on the bottom? If not, think about getting one, as these are very good at removing heat from thr cpu area.
Also make sure you have as much fan power blowing air into the case, as blowing air out. Too many fans blowing air out just cause backpreasure.
November 17, 2005 11:44:25 PM

Be very careful using a vacuum (blowing or sucking). They produce an amazing amount of static electricity. That is why compressed air is preferable. Your best cleaning will be done with alcohol and cloth. Or removing, soaking and drying.
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November 17, 2005 11:54:50 PM

I should have mentioned the plastic end, and keeping it away from the parts.
Not to worry, the air itself is a poor conductor, so if no contact is made, no cct is complete. Also ,without the plug, the system is a poor connection to ground.
November 18, 2005 4:51:55 AM

Plastic is actually worse for static electricity, being an insulator the electrons easily jump to whatever object of dissimilar charge they come in close proximity to. Remember in physics doing static electricity experiments. They used a Plexiglas rod charged with rabbit fur to hold a negative charge and charge flows from negative to positive.

In the end(yen) it’s up to you. I may clean a HSF but would never directly clean my motherboard or any electronics with a vacuum. I would clean the exit from the PSU though. You’re not going to fry a capacitor as those babies can hold a charge.
November 18, 2005 5:01:17 AM

Quote:
Plastic is actually worse for static electricity, being an insulator the electrons easily jump to whatever object of dissimilar charge they come in close proximity to. Remember in physics doing static electricity experiments. They used a Plexiglas rod charged with rabbit fur to hold a negative charge and charge flows from negative to positive.

In the end(yen) it’s up to you. I may clean a HSF but would never directly clean my motherboard or any electronics with a vacuum. I would clean the exit from the PSU though. You’re not going to fry a capacitor as those babies can hold a charge.


Lets put it this way...there is static charge from dust floating around everyones cases.

using a vacuum wont damage anything as long as you arn't rubbing the mobo with the end of the vacuum. Think about what you just said....RUBBING rabbit fur on a plexiglass rod....RUBBING. If those two items dont come togehter, no charge....Also it wouldtake one hell of a static discharge to blow anything while a computer is off and unplugged.

Compressed air is alright, vacuum is alright, taking the parts out and cleaning them piece by peice is alright....Personally i would use he vacuum if i had one wiht a blow feature....outside on a rubber mat(computer on a rubber mat, me barefoot on the ground to make the static go through me.)....and with almost no connection to the ground the static would flow through me....the thing holding the plastic and connected to the ground....rather then my computer which would be insulated.
November 18, 2005 6:03:55 AM

Although I totally agree that it is a very limited risk. Anytime you have two objects of dissimilar materials rubbing against each other, some charge is going to be produced. Humidity has a lot to do with how much charge is produced. The biggest culprit in the vacuum is the little spinning thing that picks up stuff from the carpet. I think Wimshurst invented that. Canister vacuums don’t have this and are less likely to produce a lot of charge. As for the amount of charge it takes to blow a chip, 200v is more than enough. Considering just walking across a carpet in a polyester (ahh ahh ahh staying alive) suit can produce 12000v, it is very possible.
November 18, 2005 6:25:56 AM

You are forgetting what i said....REREAD!!


If i am barefoot on my lawn....with my computer on an insulated surface....a giant rubber mat lets say....
WHERE IS THE STATIC GOING TO GO?!?!?!

think.....


keep thinking.....


do some googling for background information on elec.....


Like i said, DO NOT TOUCH THE PLASTIC HOSE TO THE COMPUTER, It would take a MASSIVE charge to put even a 1" arc...and by massive i mean in the hundreds of thousands near a million volts.....frankly your vacuum just will not create that under any circumstances...so no touching....no harm

Also if you are holding the tube barefoot on your lawn....HOW THE F*CK WILL THE CHARGE BUILD UP?!?! The instant the charge is built in the plastic tube....it will go into your hand, down your body and out your feet without you even noticing.



the only way i see a vacuum doing damage is if you rig something up....where the hose isn't attached to something grounded....like lets say a person in multilayered insulation gear....using a CRAZY powerful vacumm they dont sell to general consumers, in a grain silo full of wheat dust, and you are rubbing the tube inside the computer which is sitting in a puddle of water....
November 18, 2005 6:34:52 AM

Actually, a static charge can flow either way. I forget the second set of components in that experiment, but it doesn't really matter. In a way this whole discussion is rather funny. If you are afraid of a vacuum near your computer, better get rid of all those scary fans. After all, a vacuum is just a practical aplication of air movement. A vacuum near your computer would have the same static capabilities as your case. Truly, the vacuum would be less likely, because they are designed to avoid static buildup.
A good piece of advice though, would be to keep glass rods out of your case, if you have a cat.
November 18, 2005 6:57:58 AM

Quote:
A good piece of advice though, would be to keep glass rods out of your case, if you have a cat.


:lol:  :lol:  :lol:  :lol:  :lol:  :lol:  :lol:  :lol:  :lol:  :lol:  :lol:  :lol:  :lol:  :lol:  :lol: 


you are just too perfect sometimes.
November 18, 2005 3:41:53 PM

pickxx
Dude why are you being a dork? You’re acting like I said your using a vacuum on a rubber mat barefoot with your thingy in a small woodland creature would kill your computer. What I didn’t agree from you is that you need to rub your plastic rod to build up static electricity. You were talking about a specific case, everything I’ve stated is based on the general case. No one is going to be barefoot with the computer on a rubber mat while working on it. Duh. Maybe you should reread what I said!!!

endyen
As for which way static electricity will flow, it depends on the material. Glass, mammal material (hair, dry skin), lead, aluminum, paper will all build up positive charges. While wood, nickel, copper, gold, plastic, polyester all go negative. Cotton and steel are neutral. If a sharp edged negative material rubs against a flat positive material the later will walk away with a charge and vice versa.
November 18, 2005 5:37:24 PM

Besides the point of zapping (or not) the crap out of a computer, I think it's fairly obvious that even 70 degrees is not something I'd personally be willing to accept with open arms. 80 is just right out. Get a big fricken 120mm-fanned third party heatsink and save that poor CPU from itself. Good case airflow or not, that HSF just ain't cuttin' it IMHO.
November 18, 2005 7:25:32 PM

*enter the thread looking for AMDMeltdown...*
*getting out the thread looking for Meltie...*

Amazing.. Meltie choose his week to enter this forum and bash AMD.. It's the third Intel overheating case in not that much time...


Poor meltie... troll forever!!
!