Run batch file overnight

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsnt.misc (More info?)

I want to run a batch file (which I have tested and works) to do some
moving of files overnight for my own extra backup at work (I am not
the network admin). What is the best way to do this?

I have tried using "Scheduled Tasks" in the control panel, but this
seems to require me to be logged in in order for the task to run,
which is less than ideal. Can anybody help?

Thanks in advance,
D. Edwards
8 answers Last reply
More about batch file overnight
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsnt.misc (More info?)

    No you don't need to be logged on. Just keep in mind if it involves network
    resources, make sure the user account has permissions to the resources and
    also use UNC paths as mapped drives won't exist when no one is logged on.


    --
    Regards,

    Dave Patrick ....Please no email replies - reply in newsgroup.
    Microsoft Certified Professional
    Microsoft MVP [Windows]
    http://www.microsoft.com/protect


    "Daryl J. Edwards" wrote:
    |I want to run a batch file (which I have tested and works) to do some
    | moving of files overnight for my own extra backup at work (I am not
    | the network admin). What is the best way to do this?
    |
    | I have tried using "Scheduled Tasks" in the control panel, but this
    | seems to require me to be logged in in order for the task to run,
    | which is less than ideal. Can anybody help?
    |
    | Thanks in advance,
    | D. Edwards
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsnt.misc (More info?)

    If you're going to want any program/task/service to run, SOMEONE is
    going to have to be logged in. Thus, running the batch file through task
    scheduler is your best option but as you say you'll need to be logged
    in. I have a feeling you'll find this unavoidable.
    good luck
    sh4d03

    Daryl J. Edwards wrote:

    > I want to run a batch file (which I have tested and works) to do some
    > moving of files overnight for my own extra backup at work (I am not
    > the network admin). What is the best way to do this?
    >
    > I have tried using "Scheduled Tasks" in the control panel, but this
    > seems to require me to be logged in in order for the task to run,
    > which is less than ideal. Can anybody help?
    >
    > Thanks in advance,
    > D. Edwards
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsnt.misc (More info?)

    Ridiculous

    --
    Regards,

    Dave Patrick ....Please no email replies - reply in newsgroup.
    Microsoft Certified Professional
    Microsoft MVP [Windows]
    http://www.microsoft.com/protect


    "sh4d03" wrote:
    | If you're going to want any program/task/service to run, SOMEONE is
    | going to have to be logged in. Thus, running the batch file through task
    | scheduler is your best option but as you say you'll need to be logged
    | in. I have a feeling you'll find this unavoidable.
    | good luck
    | sh4d03
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsnt.misc (More info?)

    what does "UNC paths" stand for? I believe what you mean is non-mapped
    paths, and I think that may have been the problem before.


    "Dave Patrick" <mail@NoSpam.DSPatrick.com> wrote in message news:<uyRE2ivTEHA.332@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl>...
    > No you don't need to be logged on. Just keep in mind if it involves network
    > resources, make sure the user account has permissions to the resources and
    > also use UNC paths as mapped drives won't exist when no one is logged on.
    >
    >
    > --
    > Regards,
    >
    > Dave Patrick ....Please no email replies - reply in newsgroup.
    > Microsoft Certified Professional
    > Microsoft MVP [Windows]
    > http://www.microsoft.com/protect
    >
    >
    > "Daryl J. Edwards" wrote:
    > |I want to run a batch file (which I have tested and works) to do some
    > | moving of files overnight for my own extra backup at work (I am not
    > | the network admin). What is the best way to do this?
    > |
    > | I have tried using "Scheduled Tasks" in the control panel, but this
    > | seems to require me to be logged in in order for the task to run,
    > | which is less than ideal. Can anybody help?
    > |
    > | Thanks in advance,
    > | D. Edwards
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsnt.misc (More info?)

    Correct UNC = uniform naming convention. An example;
    \\computername\C$\somepath

    --
    Regards,

    Dave Patrick ....Please no email replies - reply in newsgroup.
    Microsoft Certified Professional
    Microsoft MVP [Windows]
    http://www.microsoft.com/protect


    "Daryl J. Edwards" wrote:
    | what does "UNC paths" stand for? I believe what you mean is non-mapped
    | paths, and I think that may have been the problem before.
  6. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsnt.misc (More info?)

    Thanks a lot! It works!

    Daryl


    "Dave Patrick" <mail@NoSpam.DSPatrick.com> wrote in message news:<OXRvY9hUEHA.3016@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl>...
    > Correct UNC = uniform naming convention. An example;
    > \\computername\C$\somepath
    >
    > --
    > Regards,
    >
    > Dave Patrick ....Please no email replies - reply in newsgroup.
    > Microsoft Certified Professional
    > Microsoft MVP [Windows]
    > http://www.microsoft.com/protect
    >
    >
    > "Daryl J. Edwards" wrote:
    > | what does "UNC paths" stand for? I believe what you mean is non-mapped
    > | paths, and I think that may have been the problem before.
  7. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsnt.misc (More info?)

    You're welcome.

    --
    Regards,

    Dave Patrick ....Please no email replies - reply in newsgroup.
    Microsoft Certified Professional
    Microsoft MVP [Windows]
    http://www.microsoft.com/protect


    "Daryl J. Edwards" wrote:
    | Thanks a lot! It works!
    |
    | Daryl
  8. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsnt.misc (More info?)

    Dave Patrick wrote:
    > Correct UNC = uniform naming convention. An example;
    > \\computername\C$\somepath
    >

    UNC is also commonly called "universal ..."
    instead of "uniform ...".

    Can't remember which was the original and which is the
    common error that became an acceptable alternative
    simply because that error propagated through the IT
    world so thoroughly.
Ask a new question

Read More

Control Panel Microsoft Windows