Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Frequent WiFi Disconnects

Last response: in Wireless Networking
Share
August 24, 2005 2:43:35 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

I've been asked to check out a friend's home wifi network because
because she experiences frequent wifi disconnects (that is, the wireless
connection between her laptop and her AP drops). I know that the laptop
runs WinXP (but not whether it is home or pro; I assume, but don't know,
that it's been patched to sp2). I don't know what brand/model wifi
access point she has, but I recall that it's set up in a non-standard
manner, perhaps as a bridge: There's an ISP-supplied modem/router
(non-wireless) and the wifi AP is connected to that via one of the AP
LAN ports (i.e., not the AP WAN port). I wouldn't think, however, that
the network architecture would have an effect on wireless connectivity
(aside from the physical location of the antennas).

I know about some possible issues to look for, including ensuring that
SSID broadcast is enabled and to uncheck the option "Enable IEEE 802.1x
authentication for this network." I've also seen more than one
recommendation to disable WZC and use the native config utility for
whatever wireless adapter is in the laptop.

The question I have is based on my friend's report that her disconnect
problem seems to occur only when someone is using another PC that has a
wired connection to the network. Is it possible that increased
non-wireless network activity could cause the wireless connection to be
dropped? If so, any suggestions for dealing with this situation?
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
August 24, 2005 3:43:32 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

HI
Assuming that the wired PC is the culprit.
Check whether it is the whole Wireless drops, or just the Internet connection is
dropped.
If the Internet connection is dropped it might be that there is No appropriate Routing
(NAT). I.e. The Modem/Router is not configure correctly.
If the whole Wireless connection stops functioning it might be that Access Point is not
configured correctly for the Network. (If the AP is connected after Routing its IP has
to be of the same band as the LAN and DHCP Off)
Jack (MVP-Networking).


"Lem" <lemp40@hotmail.com> wrote in message news:430C8797.F5BFA678@hotmail.com...
> I've been asked to check out a friend's home wifi network because
> because she experiences frequent wifi disconnects (that is, the wireless
> connection between her laptop and her AP drops). I know that the laptop
> runs WinXP (but not whether it is home or pro; I assume, but don't know,
> that it's been patched to sp2). I don't know what brand/model wifi
> access point she has, but I recall that it's set up in a non-standard
> manner, perhaps as a bridge: There's an ISP-supplied modem/router
> (non-wireless) and the wifi AP is connected to that via one of the AP
> LAN ports (i.e., not the AP WAN port). I wouldn't think, however, that
> the network architecture would have an effect on wireless connectivity
> (aside from the physical location of the antennas).
>
> I know about some possible issues to look for, including ensuring that
> SSID broadcast is enabled and to uncheck the option "Enable IEEE 802.1x
> authentication for this network." I've also seen more than one
> recommendation to disable WZC and use the native config utility for
> whatever wireless adapter is in the laptop.
>
> The question I have is based on my friend's report that her disconnect
> problem seems to occur only when someone is using another PC that has a
> wired connection to the network. Is it possible that increased
> non-wireless network activity could cause the wireless connection to be
> dropped? If so, any suggestions for dealing with this situation?
>
August 24, 2005 4:14:13 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

I will check to see if it's the Internet connection rather than the wireless connection
that's getting dropped. But as far as the configuration of the modem/router or AP is
concerned, I thought that if the wireless laptop can successfully connect to the Internet
at least some of the time, the modem/router and AP must be configured correctly. For
example, if the AP wasn't on the same subnet as the LAN (I assume that's what you mean by
"the same band"), wouldn't there be no connectivity at all?

On the other hand, your mention of making sure that DHCP is off on the AP gives me some
ideas about a few more things to check, including looking to see if there are multiple DHCP
servers and/or multiple master browsers active.

"Jack (MVP)" wrote:

> HI
> Assuming that the wired PC is the culprit.
> Check whether it is the whole Wireless drops, or just the Internet connection is
> dropped.
> If the Internet connection is dropped it might be that there is No appropriate Routing
> (NAT). I.e. The Modem/Router is not configure correctly.
> If the whole Wireless connection stops functioning it might be that Access Point is not
> configured correctly for the Network. (If the AP is connected after Routing its IP has
> to be of the same band as the LAN and DHCP Off)
> Jack (MVP-Networking).
>
> "Lem" <lemp40@hotmail.com> wrote in message news:430C8797.F5BFA678@hotmail.com...
> > I've been asked to check out a friend's home wifi network because
> > because she experiences frequent wifi disconnects (that is, the wireless
> > connection between her laptop and her AP drops). I know that the laptop
> > runs WinXP (but not whether it is home or pro; I assume, but don't know,
> > that it's been patched to sp2). I don't know what brand/model wifi
> > access point she has, but I recall that it's set up in a non-standard
> > manner, perhaps as a bridge: There's an ISP-supplied modem/router
> > (non-wireless) and the wifi AP is connected to that via one of the AP
> > LAN ports (i.e., not the AP WAN port). I wouldn't think, however, that
> > the network architecture would have an effect on wireless connectivity
> > (aside from the physical location of the antennas).
> >
> > I know about some possible issues to look for, including ensuring that
> > SSID broadcast is enabled and to uncheck the option "Enable IEEE 802.1x
> > authentication for this network." I've also seen more than one
> > recommendation to disable WZC and use the native config utility for
> > whatever wireless adapter is in the laptop.
> >
> > The question I have is based on my friend's report that her disconnect
> > problem seems to occur only when someone is using another PC that has a
> > wired connection to the network. Is it possible that increased
> > non-wireless network activity could cause the wireless connection to be
> > dropped? If so, any suggestions for dealing with this situation?
> >
!