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WPA2 and turbo mode?

Last response: in Wireless Networking
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August 28, 2005 8:29:26 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

I installed a new Hawking G wireless adapter in my XP SP-2 laptop and it
seems to work fine to connect to my WPA protected system.

However, there are 2 items that are not mentioned in the manual and I am not
clear about.

One of the settings asks me to select between WPA and WPA2. What is the
difference?

Also, when it tries to connect, it tells me the other adapters do not have
turbo and should I let it "optimize". What does it mean by turbo and
optimize? Neither are in the manual.


--

Johnson@naol.com

More about : wpa2 turbo mode

Anonymous
August 29, 2005 9:23:08 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

WPA2 is the newest standard and uses AES (WPA uses TKIP). If your
wireless router/access point supports WPA2, by all means you should
use it. If not, stick to WPA. My column on WPA2 should be appearing in
the Expert Zone in the very near future. Depending on your router,
there may already be a firmware upgrade that adds WPA2. Some info in
my blog on this.

Turbo - a non standards based "speed booster". Will work if you have
other wireless gear with the same chipset and appropriate drivers that
support it.

On Sun, 28 Aug 2005 16:29:26 -0400, "Jeff" <jeff@naol.com> wrote:

>I installed a new Hawking G wireless adapter in my XP SP-2 laptop and it
>seems to work fine to connect to my WPA protected system.
>
>However, there are 2 items that are not mentioned in the manual and I am not
>clear about.
>
>One of the settings asks me to select between WPA and WPA2. What is the
>difference?
>
>Also, when it tries to connect, it tells me the other adapters do not have
>turbo and should I let it "optimize". What does it mean by turbo and
>optimize? Neither are in the manual.
--

Barb Bowman
MS Windows-MVP
Expert Zone Columnist
http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/meetexper...
http://www.mcemvp.us/bbowman/
August 29, 2005 10:24:07 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

Thank you.

In my case apparently the chipsets do not match and therefore Turbo
apparently cannot be implemented. Right after it informs of that, it says
it will therefore "optimize". Do you know what that means? Where can I
find your column?

Thanks.

Jeff

"Barb Bowman MVP-Windows" <barb@nospam.com> wrote in message
news:smk5h15pui6obbdk7fqhia405n1blgqhid@4ax.com...
> WPA2 is the newest standard and uses AES (WPA uses TKIP). If your
> wireless router/access point supports WPA2, by all means you should
> use it. If not, stick to WPA. My column on WPA2 should be appearing in
> the Expert Zone in the very near future. Depending on your router,
> there may already be a firmware upgrade that adds WPA2. Some info in
> my blog on this.
>
> Turbo - a non standards based "speed booster". Will work if you have
> other wireless gear with the same chipset and appropriate drivers that
> support it.
>
> On Sun, 28 Aug 2005 16:29:26 -0400, "Jeff" <jeff@naol.com> wrote:
>
>>I installed a new Hawking G wireless adapter in my XP SP-2 laptop and it
>>seems to work fine to connect to my WPA protected system.
>>
>>However, there are 2 items that are not mentioned in the manual and I am
>>not
>>clear about.
>>
>>One of the settings asks me to select between WPA and WPA2. What is the
>>difference?
>>
>>Also, when it tries to connect, it tells me the other adapters do not have
>>turbo and should I let it "optimize". What does it mean by turbo and
>>optimize? Neither are in the manual.
> --
>
> Barb Bowman
> MS Windows-MVP
> Expert Zone Columnist
> http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/meetexper...
> http://www.mcemvp.us/bbowman/
Related resources
Anonymous
August 29, 2005 12:35:37 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

The column on WPA2 is not yet published. It could go up as early as
today. The ms.com staff will post a link here.

I can't tell you what "optimize" means on your equipment. You need to
contact customer support at Hawking.

On Mon, 29 Aug 2005 06:24:07 -0400, "Jeff" <jeff@naol.com> wrote:

>Thank you.
>
>In my case apparently the chipsets do not match and therefore Turbo
>apparently cannot be implemented. Right after it informs of that, it says
>it will therefore "optimize". Do you know what that means? Where can I
>find your column?
>
>Thanks.
>
>Jeff
>
>"Barb Bowman MVP-Windows" <barb@nospam.com> wrote in message
>news:smk5h15pui6obbdk7fqhia405n1blgqhid@4ax.com...
>> WPA2 is the newest standard and uses AES (WPA uses TKIP). If your
>> wireless router/access point supports WPA2, by all means you should
>> use it. If not, stick to WPA. My column on WPA2 should be appearing in
>> the Expert Zone in the very near future. Depending on your router,
>> there may already be a firmware upgrade that adds WPA2. Some info in
>> my blog on this.
>>
>> Turbo - a non standards based "speed booster". Will work if you have
>> other wireless gear with the same chipset and appropriate drivers that
>> support it.
>>
>> On Sun, 28 Aug 2005 16:29:26 -0400, "Jeff" <jeff@naol.com> wrote:
>>
>>>I installed a new Hawking G wireless adapter in my XP SP-2 laptop and it
>>>seems to work fine to connect to my WPA protected system.
>>>
>>>However, there are 2 items that are not mentioned in the manual and I am
>>>not
>>>clear about.
>>>
>>>One of the settings asks me to select between WPA and WPA2. What is the
>>>difference?
>>>
>>>Also, when it tries to connect, it tells me the other adapters do not have
>>>turbo and should I let it "optimize". What does it mean by turbo and
>>>optimize? Neither are in the manual.
>> --
>>
>> Barb Bowman
>> MS Windows-MVP
>> Expert Zone Columnist
>> http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/meetexper...
>> http://www.mcemvp.us/bbowman/
>
--

Barb Bowman
MS Windows-MVP
Expert Zone Columnist
http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/meetexper...
http://www.mcemvp.us/bbowman/
Anonymous
August 29, 2005 9:22:15 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

Actually, both WPA and WPA2 can use either TKIP or CCMP (which is based on
AES).

"Barb Bowman MVP-Windows" <barb@nospam.com> wrote in message
news:smk5h15pui6obbdk7fqhia405n1blgqhid@4ax.com...
> WPA2 is the newest standard and uses AES (WPA uses TKIP). If your
> wireless router/access point supports WPA2, by all means you should
> use it. If not, stick to WPA. My column on WPA2 should be appearing in
> the Expert Zone in the very near future. Depending on your router,
> there may already be a firmware upgrade that adds WPA2. Some info in
> my blog on this.
>
> Turbo - a non standards based "speed booster". Will work if you have
> other wireless gear with the same chipset and appropriate drivers that
> support it.
>
> On Sun, 28 Aug 2005 16:29:26 -0400, "Jeff" <jeff@naol.com> wrote:
>
>>I installed a new Hawking G wireless adapter in my XP SP-2 laptop and it
>>seems to work fine to connect to my WPA protected system.
>>
>>However, there are 2 items that are not mentioned in the manual and I am
>>not
>>clear about.
>>
>>One of the settings asks me to select between WPA and WPA2. What is the
>>difference?
>>
>>Also, when it tries to connect, it tells me the other adapters do not have
>>turbo and should I let it "optimize". What does it mean by turbo and
>>optimize? Neither are in the manual.
> --
>
> Barb Bowman
> MS Windows-MVP
> Expert Zone Columnist
> http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/meetexper...
> http://www.mcemvp.us/bbowman/
Anonymous
August 30, 2005 9:40:38 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

I over simplified for this answer. The WPA2 standard requires the CCMP
type of AES. Gear that is capable of AES is not necessarily WPA2
compliant. Gear that is TKIP should be WPA (original) compliant.

On Mon, 29 Aug 2005 17:22:15 -0700, "Zhong Deng [MSFT]"
<zdeng@online.micrsoft.com> wrote:

>Actually, both WPA and WPA2 can use either TKIP or CCMP (which is based on
>AES).
>
>"Barb Bowman MVP-Windows" <barb@nospam.com> wrote in message
>news:smk5h15pui6obbdk7fqhia405n1blgqhid@4ax.com...
>> WPA2 is the newest standard and uses AES (WPA uses TKIP). If your
>> wireless router/access point supports WPA2, by all means you should
>> use it. If not, stick to WPA. My column on WPA2 should be appearing in
>> the Expert Zone in the very near future. Depending on your router,
>> there may already be a firmware upgrade that adds WPA2. Some info in
>> my blog on this.
>>
>> Turbo - a non standards based "speed booster". Will work if you have
>> other wireless gear with the same chipset and appropriate drivers that
>> support it.
>>
>> On Sun, 28 Aug 2005 16:29:26 -0400, "Jeff" <jeff@naol.com> wrote:
>>
>>>I installed a new Hawking G wireless adapter in my XP SP-2 laptop and it
>>>seems to work fine to connect to my WPA protected system.
>>>
>>>However, there are 2 items that are not mentioned in the manual and I am
>>>not
>>>clear about.
>>>
>>>One of the settings asks me to select between WPA and WPA2. What is the
>>>difference?
>>>
>>>Also, when it tries to connect, it tells me the other adapters do not have
>>>turbo and should I let it "optimize". What does it mean by turbo and
>>>optimize? Neither are in the manual.
>> --
>>
>> Barb Bowman
>> MS Windows-MVP
>> Expert Zone Columnist
>> http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/meetexper...
>> http://www.mcemvp.us/bbowman/
>
--

Barb Bowman
MS Windows-MVP
Expert Zone Columnist
http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/meetexper...
http://www.mcemvp.us/bbowman/
!