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What size should I give to my pagefile?

Last response: in Windows 7
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March 14, 2011 5:08:07 PM

Hi,

Ever since I changed my RAM modules, Windows always allocated more space to the pagefile. When I had 4GB of RAM, the advised size of the pagefile by Windows was 6GB. I now have 8GB of RAM and Windows recommended size for the PF is 12GB. So I set a fixed size of 12GB for the PF and didn't let Windows manage the file by itself. I'm about to get 4x 4GB of RAM for a total of 16GB. And I think it would be really exaggerated to allocate 16GBx1.5=24GB for the pagefile, especially because my system is on a 60GB SSD.

I want to keep a pagefile so please don't advise me to disable it. This is my workstation and believe me I will use all of the 16GB of RAM.
My question is: what is the size I should give to the pagefile to avoid any problem (like app crashes)?
Is there a way to see in Windows how much MB or GB is currently used by the pagefile? --> That would be a good way to assess my needs.
Thanks in advance.

More about : size give pagefile

March 14, 2011 5:28:42 PM

The pagefile being advised to be set that high is from days in which 128-512mb of RAM was common and you got a good performance boost from 1.5x physical RAM as your pagefile.

Today with 4GB+ becoming the norm setting much above 6GB for the pagefile is unnecesary.

You will most probably get away with 12GB pagefile with 16GB RAM with no issues; maybe even less like 8GB if space is an issue.
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March 14, 2011 8:41:36 PM

I'll set it to 8GB but it still sounds like a huge amount. How can I check all the 8GB will really be used by the pagefile?
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March 14, 2011 8:50:19 PM

Open Task Manager, go to the Performance Tab. Look at where it says PF Usage. It will vary depending on what applications you have open. Some apps may utilize the Page File more than others.

I run with 8GB of RAM. Primarily a gaming rig. I have my pagefile set to 2gb RAM. I haven't experienced any issues with that amount. Some people with 8gb RAM, or more, run with the Page File disabled . I would not recommend doing that though. Some applications require the Page File regardless of how much system RAM you have.
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March 14, 2011 8:55:49 PM

brett1042002 said:
Open Task Manager, go to the Performance Tab. Look at where it says PF Usage. It will vary depending on what applications you have open. Some apps may utilize the Page File more than others.

I run with 8GB of RAM. Primarily a gaming rig. I have my pagefile set to 2gb RAM. I haven't experienced any issues with that amount. Some people with 8gb RAM, or more, run with the Page File disabled . I would not recommend doing that though. Some applications require the Page File regardless of how much system RAM you have.


I don't see PF Usage in my task manager :( 

Physical Memory

Kernel Memory

System
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Commit (MB) 3975/6140

i have 2x2gb and 2gb pagefile.
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a c 209 $ Windows 7
March 14, 2011 11:07:37 PM

Everyone is different, so you can't really go on someone else's recommendation. To find out how much page file YOU need, do this:

- open up all the programs, games, applications, browsers, etc. you ever use at once. In each program. open as many documents, web pages, videos, photos, etc. as you ever use. In other words, load up your system as much as possible to the maximum you ever expect to use at any one time.

- open Task Manager (Ctrl+Shift+Esc) and click the "Performance" tab.

- note the number that shows below the left end of the "Memory" graph. That's how much memory is used by the OS and all the programs and documents you've got open.

- take that memory number and add a fudge factor of 25 or 50%. Let's say that the number is 8GB - if you add a 50% fudge factor then that gives you 12GB. The purpose of the fudge factor is to provide a "safety margin" so that you don't run out of space for your programs under the worst scenario.

- subtract the amount of actual RAM you have from the number you came up with. For example if you have 10GB of RAM and your adjusted memory requirement is 12GB, then your pagefile needs to be 2GB in size.

If the amount of actual RAM is LARGER than the memory number you came up with, then changes are you don't need a page file at all. I have 12GB of memory and I've been running with the pagefile disabled for a couple of years now with no problems whatsoever. Be aware, though, that some older programs may not work properly without a pagefile - for example Photoshop 6 wouldn't work for me unless I enabled a page file, even if it was just a tiny one.
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