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Using both parallel & USB on same printer (Canon ip4000)

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Anonymous
October 20, 2004 1:04:14 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

I have my Canon ip4000 on my home network with a parallel port print server
appliance. It works great except that I cannot use the ink monitor
software.

Is there a configuration that would allow me to monitor the ink via the USB
port, but print through the network, without encountering conflicts or print
errors? How does the printer manage requests coming in on both ports?

The port that I currently have defined in my driver settings is an "LPR"
port.

- David
Anonymous
October 20, 2004 9:43:57 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

"David D." <daviddiamond.remove-if-not-spam@comcast.net> wrote in message news:<bIydnTX3WZQWJOjcRVn-og@comcast.com>...
> Is there a configuration that would allow me to monitor the ink via the USB
> port, but print through the network, without encountering conflicts or print
> errors? How does the printer manage requests coming in on both ports?

I have a Canon 850, which probably behaves similarly. I connect a
parallel 'LPR' print server, and a USB cable from my main computer
(Win XP), simultaneously. If one interface is printing, the other is
safely locked out producing a 'the printer is in use on another
interface' if I try to use USB while another computer is using the
print server. This handy behaviour is despite the docs saying it's not
supported!

The computer with the USB connection successfully receives ink
statuses, and duplexing 'turn the paper over' messages.

The only thing I could never do was duplex using the print server; the
printer would either print the whole job at once without giving me
chance to turn over, or it would 'stick' after the first half and
never continue. Has anyone ever achieved this? (from Win98 or XP)

--
Chris Yearsley
October 20, 2004 12:53:43 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

On Tue, 19 Oct 2004 21:04:14 -0400, "David D."
<daviddiamond.remove-if-not-spam@comcast.net> wrote:

>I have my Canon ip4000 on my home network with a parallel port print server
>appliance. It works great except that I cannot use the ink monitor
>software.
>
>Is there a configuration that would allow me to monitor the ink via the USB
>port, but print through the network, without encountering conflicts or print
>errors? How does the printer manage requests coming in on both ports?
>
>The port that I currently have defined in my driver settings is an "LPR"
>port.
>
> - David
>
>
For the Parallel connection to show results in the ink monitor
software you need to use a bi-directional cable.

KM
Related resources
Anonymous
October 21, 2004 11:22:17 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

"Chris Yearsley" <google@yearsley.org> wrote in message
news:1d93427.0410200443.23519166@posting.google.com...
> The only thing I could never do was duplex using the print server; the
> printer would either print the whole job at once without giving me
> chance to turn over, or it would 'stick' after the first half and
> never continue. Has anyone ever achieved this? (from Win98 or XP)
>
> --
> Chris Yearsley

Chris,

I have no problem with duplexing with my Canon ip4000. It is hooked up as
an LPR printer over ethernet to a parallel-port print server appliance.
I can turn duplex on or off either via printer properties, or via Canon's
"Easy Web-Print" browser tool bar.

- David
Anonymous
October 23, 2004 4:37:55 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Does anyone have experience with connecting the iP4000 to an USB print
server? I am using the D-Link DP-301U. When I connect it through this print
server it does not tell me anymore the status of the printer, the ink
levels, and so forth. Duplex and CD/DVD printing goes okay. Should the
printer be able to 'talk back' through the USB print server, or should I
just check the ink level through the transparent tanks from now on? Any
suggestions?

Thanks!
Frans
Anonymous
October 23, 2004 4:37:56 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Print server appliances are typically not fully bi-directional. They seem
to pass back standard error statuses, but not pass through proprietary
printer information.

I am not sure about checking the printer cartridges visually. You would
have to remove them, and that could break the prime. Does anyone else out
there have information on this matter?

I, personally, am pursuing a different approach. My print server appliance
plugs into the printer's parallel port, leaving the printer's USB port free.
So I will run a USB cable from one of the computers directly to the printer,
in order to get ink status. Other printers will use the ethernet-to-print
server access. The primary computer will also print over the network as a
secondary access path. I have not tried this yet, but based on ng
feedback, it is worth a shot.

- David



"Franzy" <franzy@non.existant> wrote in message
news:417a3483$0$78772$e4fe514c@news.xs4all.nl...
> Does anyone have experience with connecting the iP4000 to an USB print
> server? I am using the D-Link DP-301U. When I connect it through this
print
> server it does not tell me anymore the status of the printer, the ink
> levels, and so forth. Duplex and CD/DVD printing goes okay. Should the
> printer be able to 'talk back' through the USB print server, or should I
> just check the ink level through the transparent tanks from now on? Any
> suggestions?
>
> Thanks!
> Frans
>
>
October 23, 2004 4:37:57 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

David D. wrote:

>I am not sure about checking the printer cartridges visually. You would
>have to remove them, and that could break the prime. Does anyone else out
>there have information on this matter?

Simply lifting the lid will give a pretty good idea of how much ink
remains in each ink tank, but a status monitor is nice. :) 

>I, personally, am pursuing a different approach. My print server appliance
>plugs into the printer's parallel port, leaving the printer's USB port free.
>So I will run a USB cable from one of the computers directly to the printer,
>in order to get ink status. Other printers will use the ethernet-to-print
>server access. The primary computer will also print over the network as a
>secondary access path. I have not tried this yet, but based on ng
>feedback, it is worth a shot.

Just remember to install network printer drivers for the networked
printer on each computer that will need to access it, otherwise the
other computers won't "see" the networked printer.

>"Franzy" <franzy@non.existant> wrote in message
>news:417a3483$0$78772$e4fe514c@news.xs4all.nl...
>> Does anyone have experience with connecting the iP4000 to an USB print
>> server? I am using the D-Link DP-301U. When I connect it through this
>print
>> server it does not tell me anymore the status of the printer, the ink
>> levels, and so forth.

I'm not sure if a USB print server will pass the info or not. But did
you install network printer drivers?
Anonymous
October 23, 2004 8:38:11 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

"Bill" <bill@c.a> wrote in message news:8dSdnaN_LLBd6efcRVn-1w@golden.net...
> I'm not sure if a USB print server will pass the info or not. But did
> you install network printer drivers?

No. I just defined the printers as going to my LPR port. I thought the
network drivers were for use on a print server host computer, rather than
for a client going to a print server appliance.

- David
Anonymous
October 24, 2004 9:10:15 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

> Print server appliances are typically not fully bi-directional. They
> seem
> to pass back standard error statuses, but not pass through proprietary
> printer information.

I guess that's the case in my situation.

> I am not sure about checking the printer cartridges visually. You would
> have to remove them, and that could break the prime. Does anyone else
> out
> there have information on this matter?

It's pretty dark in there too, and I do not feel like taking them out, guess
that does not work either.

> I, personally, am pursuing a different approach. My print server
> appliance
> plugs into the printer's parallel port, leaving the printer's USB port
> free.
> So I will run a USB cable from one of the computers directly to the
> printer,
> in order to get ink status. Other printers will use the
> ethernet-to-print
> server access. The primary computer will also print over the network as
> a
> secondary access path. I have not tried this yet, but based on ng
> feedback, it is worth a shot.

Does not work for me either since I have a USB print server, so the
printer's USB port is already used. I had the server before I bought the
printer. I am thinking about selling the server and just connect the printer
to a computer again and share it. I have tested it and then you are able to
see the ink level and all the cool error messages like you forgot to open
the output tray, again.

Thanks!
Frans :-)
Anonymous
October 24, 2004 9:10:16 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

"Franzy" <franzy@non.existant> wrote in message
news:417bc5d8$0$36860$e4fe514c@news.xs4all.nl...
>
> Does not work for me either since I have a USB print server, so the
> printer's USB port is already used. I had the server before I bought the
> printer. I am thinking about selling the server and just connect the
printer
> to a computer again and share it. I have tested it and then you are able
to
> see the ink level and all the cool error messages like you forgot to open
> the output tray, again.
>
> Thanks!
> Frans :-)
>

You could try the opposite. Use the USB for your print server connection,
and the parallel port to the nearest computer to check on the ink.

I don't guarantee that it would work, but if you have a bi-directional
parallel cable lying around, you could try it.
!