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Anonymous
August 7, 2004 7:32:53 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsnt.registry,microsoft.public.win2000.registry (More info?)

Hi,

Does anyone know how to use regedit to work with external registry file
from the command line? In 9x based OSes you use the /R and /L command line
switches to specify where USER.DAT and SYSTEM.DAT are, but in NT based OSes
those files do not exist; instead you have separate files for software,
system, default, etc. as well as a separate NTUSER.DAT file for each user.

I'm in Windows XP in a command prompt, I have extracted the required
NTUSER.DAT file from a backup image of my hard drive, and I want to extract
a key from that but have no idea how to specify it as the source rather than
the active registry.

I've looked around everywhere but cannot find any info on using an
external file from the command line. I've tried doing

regedit /r:g:\software /e t.reg "HKEY_CURRENT_USER\BLAH*>|<"

But that does not work, no file is created and regedit returns an
errorcode of 0.


Any ideas? Thanks.

--
Alec S.
alec <@> synetech <.> cjb <.> net
Anonymous
August 8, 2004 2:23:47 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsnt.registry,microsoft.public.win2000.registry (More info?)

Alec S. wrote:

> Does anyone know how to use regedit to work with external registry file
> from the command line? In 9x based OSes you use the /R and /L command line
> switches to specify where USER.DAT and SYSTEM.DAT are, but in NT based OSes
> those files do not exist; instead you have separate files for software,
> system, default, etc. as well as a separate NTUSER.DAT file for each user.
>
> I'm in Windows XP in a command prompt, I have extracted the required
> NTUSER.DAT file from a backup image of my hard drive, and I want to extract
> a key from that but have no idea how to specify it as the source rather than
> the active registry.
>
> I've looked around everywhere but cannot find any info on using an
> external file from the command line. I've tried doing
>
> regedit /r:g:\software /e t.reg "HKEY_CURRENT_USER\BLAH*>|<"
>
> But that does not work, no file is created and regedit returns an
> errorcode of 0.
Hi

Use reg.exe instead (it comes builtin with WinXP).

Example on how to load an external hive file:

reg.exe load HKLM\TmpHive "C:\Documents and Settings\Administrator\NTUSER.DAT"


Then you can use "reg.exe query" to do a query on the key in question
(or "reg.exe export" if you want to export the key to an ordinary
registry file)

Run "reg.exe /?" in a command prompt for more help.



--
torgeir, Microsoft MVP Scripting and WMI, Porsgrunn Norway
Administration scripting examples and an ONLINE version of
the 1328 page Scripting Guide:
http://www.microsoft.com/technet/scriptcenter/default.m...
Anonymous
August 8, 2004 2:23:48 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsnt.registry,microsoft.public.win2000.registry (More info?)

I actually looked at REG earlier but it did not look to be right. I
tried it again thanks to you example and while it was more complicated than
I hoped (I had to temporarily import it into the registry) it did work.

However, is there a way to do it in pure DOS mode?


--
Alec S.
alec <@> synetech <.> cjb <.> net


"Torgeir Bakken (MVP)" <Torgeir.Bakken-spam@hydro.com> wrote in message
news:o Ij7yyLfEHA.3200@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> Alec S. wrote:
>
> > Does anyone know how to use regedit to work with external registry
file
> > from the command line? In 9x based OSes you use the /R and /L command
line
> > switches to specify where USER.DAT and SYSTEM.DAT are, but in NT based
OSes
> > those files do not exist; instead you have separate files for software,
> > system, default, etc. as well as a separate NTUSER.DAT file for each
user.
> >
> > I'm in Windows XP in a command prompt, I have extracted the required
> > NTUSER.DAT file from a backup image of my hard drive, and I want to
extract
> > a key from that but have no idea how to specify it as the source rather
than
> > the active registry.
> >
> > I've looked around everywhere but cannot find any info on using an
> > external file from the command line. I've tried doing
> >
> > regedit /r:g:\software /e t.reg "HKEY_CURRENT_USER\BLAH*>|<"
> >
> > But that does not work, no file is created and regedit returns an
> > errorcode of 0.
> Hi
>
> Use reg.exe instead (it comes builtin with WinXP).
>
> Example on how to load an external hive file:
>
> reg.exe load HKLM\TmpHive "C:\Documents and
Settings\Administrator\NTUSER.DAT"
>
>
> Then you can use "reg.exe query" to do a query on the key in question
> (or "reg.exe export" if you want to export the key to an ordinary
> registry file)
>
> Run "reg.exe /?" in a command prompt for more help.
>
>
>
> --
> torgeir, Microsoft MVP Scripting and WMI, Porsgrunn Norway
> Administration scripting examples and an ONLINE version of
> the 1328 page Scripting Guide:
> http://www.microsoft.com/technet/scriptcenter/default.m...
Related resources
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Anonymous
August 8, 2004 2:55:40 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsnt.registry,microsoft.public.win2000.registry (More info?)

In microsoft.public.win2000.registry Alec S. wrote:

> Alec S.
> alec <@> synetech <.> cjb <.> net
>
>
> "Torgeir Bakken (MVP)" <Torgeir.Bakken-spam@hydro.com> wrote in
> message news:o Ij7yyLfEHA.3200@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
>> Alec S. wrote:
>>
>> > Does anyone know how to use regedit to work with external
>> > registry
> file
>> > from the command line? In 9x based OSes you use the /R and /L
>> > command
> line
>> > switches to specify where USER.DAT and SYSTEM.DAT are, but in
>> > NT based
> OSes
>> > those files do not exist; instead you have separate files for
>> > software, system, default, etc. as well as a separate
>> > NTUSER.DAT file for each
> user.
>> >
>> > I'm in Windows XP in a command prompt, I have extracted the
>> > required
>> > NTUSER.DAT file from a backup image of my hard drive, and I
>> > want to
> extract
>> > a key from that but have no idea how to specify it as the
>> > source rather
> than
>> > the active registry.
>> >
>> > I've looked around everywhere but cannot find any info on
>> > using an
>> > external file from the command line. I've tried doing
>> >
>> > regedit /r:g:\software /e t.reg "HKEY_CURRENT_USER\BLAH*>|<"
>> >
>> > But that does not work, no file is created and regedit
>> > returns an
>> > errorcode of 0.
>> Hi
>>
>> Use reg.exe instead (it comes builtin with WinXP).
>>
>> Example on how to load an external hive file:
>>
>> reg.exe load HKLM\TmpHive "C:\Documents and
> Settings\Administrator\NTUSER.DAT"
>>
>>
>> Then you can use "reg.exe query" to do a query on the key in
>> question (or "reg.exe export" if you want to export the key to an
>> ordinary registry file)
>>
>> Run "reg.exe /?" in a command prompt for more help.

> I actually looked at REG earlier but it did not look to be
> right. I
> tried it again thanks to you example and while it was more
> complicated than I hoped (I had to temporarily import it into the
> registry) it did work.
>
> However, is there a way to do it in pure DOS mode?

We don't say "DOS mode" <G> since there is no DOS in NTx. Command-
line, CLI, text interface, blah blah... <G>

Torgeir's brief instruction (I feel) was intended to allow you to
work entirely from a CLI or batchfile. "export" was mentioned in
passing as a REG.exe capability. This step is not required.

(assuming cmd and W2K and reg.exe version 2 or greater.
=== screen cap ======
C:\temp3>reg load HKU\$TEMPORARY c:\temp3\ntuser.dat

The operation completed successfully

C:\temp3>reg query "HKEY_USERS\$TEMPORARY\Control Panel\Current"

! REG.EXE VERSION 2.0

HKEY_USERS\$TEMPORARY\Control Panel\Current
Color Schemes REG_SZ Windows Standard

C:\temp3>reg unload HKU\$TEMPORARY

The operation completed successfully
================================

Hope that helps.
Anonymous
August 8, 2004 7:15:17 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsnt.registry,microsoft.public.win2000.registry (More info?)

What I meant was pure DOS mode from a boot disc. You can use
regedit.exe in dos mode to do stuff with the registry, and that's why you
need to specify where the files are located. But that only works for 9x
registries. How can you do stuff with the NT registries when you boot to
DOS?

Also, I used the method and it worked, but there was a problem. I
loaded the registry file into a temporary hive, and exported from that. The
problem was that the resulting .REG file I got had the temporary root key in
it:

I used these commands (in a command prompt window):

REG load "HKU\ttt" "g:\ntuser.dat"
REG export "HKU\ttt\Software\Microsoft\Windows
NT\CurrentVersion\TaskManager" "g:\tm.reg"
REG unload "HKU\ttt"

Which gave me a file called tm.reg which had what I wanted in it, but the
key listed in the .REG file was this:

[HKEY_USERS\ttt\Software\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\TaskManager]

instead of this:

[HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\TaskManager]


I manually changed the key and it works fine, but if I wanted to
automate it, it would not have worked.



--
Alec S.
alec <@> synetech <.> cjb <.> net


"Mark V" <notvalid@nul.invalid> wrote in message
news:Xns953F8DAE6BB8Bz9zzaQ2btw@207.46.248.16...
>
> We don't say "DOS mode" <G> since there is no DOS in NTx. Command-
> line, CLI, text interface, blah blah... <G>
>
> Torgeir's brief instruction (I feel) was intended to allow you to
> work entirely from a CLI or batchfile. "export" was mentioned in
> passing as a REG.exe capability. This step is not required.
Anonymous
August 8, 2004 7:15:18 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsnt.registry,microsoft.public.win2000.registry (More info?)

In microsoft.public.win2000.registry Alec S. wrote:

> What I meant was pure DOS mode from a boot disc. You can use
> regedit.exe in dos mode to do stuff with the registry, and that's
> why you need to specify where the files are located. But that
> only works for 9x registries. How can you do stuff with the NT
> registries when you boot to DOS?

You can't. Sorry.
It may be possible to use a "PE"-like bootable CD to get an
environment where reg.exe or other tools can operate. Recovery
Console is also will not work for registry editing.

Or you can "load hive" with reg.exe (or regedt32.exe) on another
machine. (but don't try to change any registry ACLs).

> Also, I used the method and it worked, but there was a
> problem. I
> loaded the registry file into a temporary hive, and exported from
> that. The problem was that the resulting .REG file I got had the
> temporary root key in it:
>
> I used these commands (in a command prompt window):
>
> REG load "HKU\ttt" "g:\ntuser.dat"
> REG export "HKU\ttt\Software\Microsoft\Windows
> NT\CurrentVersion\TaskManager" "g:\tm.reg"
> REG unload "HKU\ttt"
>
> Which gave me a file called tm.reg which had what I wanted in it,
> but the key listed in the .REG file was this:
>
> [HKEY_USERS\ttt\Software\Microsoft\Windows
> NT\CurrentVersion\TaskManager]
>
> instead of this:

Because you exported not from HKCU, but HKU\<TempName>
This is expected.

>
> [HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows
> NT\CurrentVersion\TaskManager]
> I manually changed the key and it works fine, but if I wanted
> to
> automate it, it would not have worked.

It you wanted to "automate" (script) the change you would just do so
with reg.exe "live". reg.exe add /?
or reg.exe from a batchfile.

Example (data is not included. Line will wrap)
reg add "HKU\ttt\Software\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion
\TaskManager" /v Preferences /t REG_BINARY /d <long string of digits
here> /f

I'm afraid I've lost the definition of your task. Without quoting I
thought it was something like,
Read a key from a static ntuser.dat file and do it from a command
prompt (eg cmd.exe).

> Alec S.
> alec <@> synetech <.> cjb <.> net
>
>
> "Mark V" <notvalid@nul.invalid> wrote in message
> news:Xns953F8DAE6BB8Bz9zzaQ2btw@207.46.248.16...
>>
>> We don't say "DOS mode" <G> since there is no DOS in NTx.
>> Command- line, CLI, text interface, blah blah... <G>
>>
>> Torgeir's brief instruction (I feel) was intended to allow you to
>> work entirely from a CLI or batchfile. "export" was mentioned in
>> passing as a REG.exe capability. This step is not required.
>
>
>
August 9, 2004 3:03:32 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsnt.registry,microsoft.public.win2000.registry (More info?)

Hi Mark and Alec,

You can actually edit the registry of a NT system whilst it is 'not running' -
using the tools and procedures supplied here:

http://home.eunet.no/~pnordahl/ntpasswd/

Although officially created to allow 'offline' password editing, many other
tasks like registry editing can be performed. (which is basically what a
password change is anyway - a change to the SAM hive) With a bit of skill and
testing you may even be able to write 'scripts' to accomplish things
automatically for you, although I have never looked into this. Be advised that
Peter's software actually puts you into a 'cut-down' version of Linux (NOT DOS),
but that shouldn't be a major consideration.

hope this info helps.

Calvin.
Anonymous
August 9, 2004 4:22:42 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsnt.registry,microsoft.public.win2000.registry (More info?)

I can accept that you cannot edit the NT registry in DOS, but how can
you get around the temporary key name in the .REG file? Is that not
possible either?


--
Alec S.
alec <@> synetech <.> cjb <.> net



"Mark V" <notvalid@nul.invalid> wrote in message
news:Xns953FB8D9E677Cz9zzaQ2btw@207.46.248.16...
> In microsoft.public.win2000.registry Alec S. wrote:
>
> > What I meant was pure DOS mode from a boot disc. You can use
> > regedit.exe in dos mode to do stuff with the registry, and that's
> > why you need to specify where the files are located. But that
> > only works for 9x registries. How can you do stuff with the NT
> > registries when you boot to DOS?
>
> You can't. Sorry.
> It may be possible to use a "PE"-like bootable CD to get an
> environment where reg.exe or other tools can operate. Recovery
> Console is also will not work for registry editing.
>
Anonymous
August 9, 2004 11:14:22 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsnt.registry,microsoft.public.win2000.registry (More info?)

In microsoft.public.win2000.registry Alec S. wrote:

> I can accept that you cannot edit the NT registry in DOS, but
> how can
> you get around the temporary key name in the .REG file? Is that
> not possible either?

Not possible since the exported .reg file is literaly including the
exact registry path as it exists. For REG files a GUI or CLI Search
and Replace tool is the only solution I know of to "fix" the path
text.


> "Mark V" <notvalid@nul.invalid> wrote in message
> news:Xns953FB8D9E677Cz9zzaQ2btw@207.46.248.16...
>> In microsoft.public.win2000.registry Alec S. wrote:
>>
>> > What I meant was pure DOS mode from a boot disc. You can
>> > use
>> > regedit.exe in dos mode to do stuff with the registry, and
>> > that's why you need to specify where the files are located.
>> > But that only works for 9x registries. How can you do stuff
>> > with the NT registries when you boot to DOS?
>>
>> You can't. Sorry.
>> It may be possible to use a "PE"-like bootable CD to get an
>> environment where reg.exe or other tools can operate. Recovery
>> Console is also will not work for registry editing.
>>
>
>
Anonymous
August 11, 2004 6:07:57 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsnt.registry,microsoft.public.win2000.registry (More info?)

Okay, if necessary, I can do that. Thanks.


--
Alec S.
alec <@> synetech <.> cjb <.> net


"Mark V" <notvalid@nul.invalid> wrote in message
news:Xns9540E23B42BC0z9zzaQ2btw@207.46.248.16...
> In microsoft.public.win2000.registry Alec S. wrote:
>
> > I can accept that you cannot edit the NT registry in DOS, but
> > how can
> > you get around the temporary key name in the .REG file? Is that
> > not possible either?
>
> Not possible since the exported .reg file is literaly including the
> exact registry path as it exists. For REG files a GUI or CLI Search
> and Replace tool is the only solution I know of to "fix" the path
> text.
>
>
> > "Mark V" <notvalid@nul.invalid> wrote in message
> > news:Xns953FB8D9E677Cz9zzaQ2btw@207.46.248.16...
> >> In microsoft.public.win2000.registry Alec S. wrote:
> >>
> >> > What I meant was pure DOS mode from a boot disc. You can
> >> > use
> >> > regedit.exe in dos mode to do stuff with the registry, and
> >> > that's why you need to specify where the files are located.
> >> > But that only works for 9x registries. How can you do stuff
> >> > with the NT registries when you boot to DOS?
> >>
> >> You can't. Sorry.
> >> It may be possible to use a "PE"-like bootable CD to get an
> >> environment where reg.exe or other tools can operate. Recovery
> >> Console is also will not work for registry editing.
> >>
> >
> >
>
!