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drives working very hard on every boot - fix required

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Anonymous
November 9, 2004 12:36:15 PM

Archived from groups: alt.os.windows2000,microsoft.public.windowsnt.registry,microsoft.public.windows.nt.setup (More info?)

Hi,
Every time w2k boots the drive is worked very hard for over a minute.
This does not happen when there are no foreign partitions on the drive.
I have w2k + a couple of linux's (multiple boot) on the same drive. I
guess w2k is sniffing the other partitions but how do I turn this off
(registry hack or what?).

tnx
roy
Anonymous
November 9, 2004 5:00:38 PM

Archived from groups: alt.os.windows2000,microsoft.public.windowsnt.registry,microsoft.public.windows.nt.setup (More info?)

webbie wrote:

> Hi,
> Every time w2k boots the drive is worked very hard for over a minute.
> This does not happen when there are no foreign partitions on the drive.
> I have w2k + a couple of linux's (multiple boot) on the same drive. I
> guess w2k is sniffing the other partitions but how do I turn this off
> (registry hack or what?).
>
> tnx
> roy
>

FWIW I have the same situation with my Sager laptop and W2000. I don't
have any partitions or much in the way of startup stuff - Zone alarm and
AVG virusdeath. I've just gotten to the point that I wait until it gets
it out of its system, though I have wondered what in the world it's
finding to do.


--
The spam has finally gotten to me so I've corrupted the address above.
Try 'yahoo'.
Anonymous
November 9, 2004 5:00:39 PM

Archived from groups: alt.os.windows2000,microsoft.public.windowsnt.registry,microsoft.public.windows.nt.setup (More info?)

Gualtier Malde (Chuck) wrote:
> webbie wrote:
>
>> Hi,
>> Every time w2k boots the drive is worked very hard for over a minute.
>> This does not happen when there are no foreign partitions on the drive.
>> I have w2k + a couple of linux's (multiple boot) on the same drive. I
>> guess w2k is sniffing the other partitions but how do I turn this off
>> (registry hack or what?).
>> tnx
>> roy
>>
>
> FWIW I have the same situation with my Sager laptop and W2000. I don't
> have any partitions or much in the way of startup stuff - Zone alarm and
> AVG virusdeath. I've just gotten to the point that I wait until it gets
> it out of its system, though I have wondered what in the world it's
> finding to do.

At boot up, W2K/XP loads "services" (lots of them), and those startup
a/v and firewall programs. Most a/v programs do an abbreviated scan as
soon as they have loaded, or check programs that access the 'net, etc.

Applications are also loaded: if you have set an application to "quick
start", most of it is loaded into RAM on boot up, which takes time (RAM
is accessed at a _much_ lower speed than the nominal speed of the computer.)

You can reduce boot time by reducing the number of services and
applications started at boot. These programs also slow down overall
system speed, since Win2K/XP is continually switching from one program
to another.

Explorer and Active Desktop really slow down the system. Explorer should
be used only for web-browsing (or not at all), since most of what it
does can be done by knowing how to use the file manager and/or shortcuts
on a plain desktop.

Active Desktop adds bells and whistles which you generally don't need,
such as pretty pictures in the background - displaying these, redrawing
them as you open and close windows, and so on, takes an astonishing
amount of computing power.

In fact, most of the computer's computing time is spent displaying the
user interface and interacting with the user - the "real work" takes
very little computing power compared to those tasks. A conservative
estimate is that your computer spends up to 25% of its time on the user
interface, up to 5% of its time doing useful work, and 70% or more of
its time doing nothing. That is, when you are actually using it...

HTH&GL
Related resources
Anonymous
November 9, 2004 5:00:40 PM

Archived from groups: alt.os.windows2000,microsoft.public.windowsnt.registry,microsoft.public.windows.nt.setup (More info?)

"Wolf Kirchmeir" <wwolfkir@sympatico.ca> wrote in message
news:iJ5kd.20122$km5.874684@news20.bellglobal.com...
| Gualtier Malde (Chuck) wrote:
| > webbie wrote:
| >
| >> Hi,
| >> Every time w2k boots the drive is worked very hard for over a
minute.
| >> This does not happen when there are no foreign partitions on the
drive.
| >> I have w2k + a couple of linux's (multiple boot) on the same
drive. I
| >> guess w2k is sniffing the other partitions but how do I turn this
off
| >> (registry hack or what?).
| >> tnx
| >> roy
| >>
| >
| > FWIW I have the same situation with my Sager laptop and W2000. I
don't
| > have any partitions or much in the way of startup stuff - Zone
alarm and
| > AVG virusdeath. I've just gotten to the point that I wait until
it gets
| > it out of its system, though I have wondered what in the world
it's
| > finding to do.
|
| At boot up, W2K/XP loads "services" (lots of them), and those
startup
| a/v and firewall programs. Most a/v programs do an abbreviated scan
as
| soon as they have loaded, or check programs that access the 'net,
etc.
|
| Applications are also loaded: if you have set an application to
"quick
| start", most of it is loaded into RAM on boot up, which takes time
(RAM
| is accessed at a _much_ lower speed than the nominal speed of the
computer.)
|
| You can reduce boot time by reducing the number of services and
| applications started at boot. These programs also slow down overall
| system speed, since Win2K/XP is continually switching from one
program
| to another.
|
| Explorer and Active Desktop really slow down the system. Explorer
should
| be used only for web-browsing (or not at all), since most of what it
| does can be done by knowing how to use the file manager and/or
shortcuts
| on a plain desktop.

I presume you mean "Internet Explorer" should only be used for
browsing, yet Explorer IS the file manager of the new Windows OSs. IE
and Explorer are "integrated" applications, so I'm not certain what
significance can be given to your recommendations as one can "browse
the internet" from within an Explorer window. I'm uncertain as to
whether there is a dividing line between the two applications.

|
| Active Desktop adds bells and whistles which you generally don't
need,
| such as pretty pictures in the background - displaying these,
redrawing
| them as you open and close windows, and so on, takes an astonishing
| amount of computing power.
|
| In fact, most of the computer's computing time is spent displaying
the
| user interface and interacting with the user - the "real work" takes
| very little computing power compared to those tasks. A conservative
| estimate is that your computer spends up to 25% of its time on the
user
| interface, up to 5% of its time doing useful work, and 70% or more
of
| its time doing nothing. That is, when you are actually using it...


Unless you are playing games or editing videos. most systems are
running the idle task 98 or 99 % of the time. I use this same
computer every day for work purposes, email, documents, spreadsheets,
web browsing, and task manager indicates for the systems "processes"
the idle process has used 99% of the CPU over a 500 hour period of up
time.
--
Best regards,
Kyle
Anonymous
November 9, 2004 5:00:41 PM

Archived from groups: alt.os.windows2000,microsoft.public.windowsnt.registry,microsoft.public.windows.nt.setup (More info?)

[snip]

>I presume you mean "Internet Explorer" should only be used for
>browsing, yet Explorer IS the file manager of the new Windows OSs. IE
>and Explorer are "integrated" applications, so I'm not certain what
>significance can be given to your recommendations as one can "browse
>the internet" from within an Explorer window. I'm uncertain as to
>whether there is a dividing line between the two applications.
>

Yes, people do confuse "Windows Explorer" (Windows default user
interface) with "Internet Explorer". Possibly the poster was referring
to those options that use IE, "Active Desktop" and "Enable Web content
In Folders" (best turned off).

[snip]

--
55 days until the winter solstice celebration

"In all affairs it's a healthy thing now and then to
hang a question mark on the things you have long taken
for granted." -- Bertrand Russell
Anonymous
November 9, 2004 8:14:24 PM

Archived from groups: alt.os.windows2000,microsoft.public.windowsnt.registry,microsoft.public.windows.nt.setup (More info?)

On Tue, 09 Nov 2004 10:54:07 -0500, Wolf Kirchmeir wrote:

> Gualtier Malde (Chuck) wrote:
>> webbie wrote:
>>
>>> Hi,
>>> Every time w2k boots the drive is worked very hard for over a minute.
>>> This does not happen when there are no foreign partitions on the drive.
>>> I have w2k + a couple of linux's (multiple boot) on the same drive. I
>>> guess w2k is sniffing the other partitions but how do I turn this off
>>> (registry hack or what?).
>>> tnx
>>> roy
>>>
>>>
>> FWIW I have the same situation with my Sager laptop and W2000. I don't
>> have any partitions or much in the way of startup stuff - Zone alarm and
>> AVG virusdeath. I've just gotten to the point that I wait until it gets
>> it out of its system, though I have wondered what in the world it's
>> finding to do.
>
> At boot up, W2K/XP loads "services" (lots of them), and those startup a/v
> and firewall programs. Most a/v programs do an abbreviated scan as soon as
> they have loaded, or check programs that access the 'net, etc.


Nah! It's not any of that. Including what you write below. You see,
XP and w2003 do none of this. Only win2k thrashes the hard drive. It's
not what you suggest. It's something else doing it (w2k itself) and
it is wearing out the hard drive.
tnx
roy


>
> Applications are also loaded: if you have set an application to "quick
> start", most of it is loaded into RAM on boot up, which takes time (RAM is
> accessed at a _much_ lower speed than the nominal speed of the computer.)
>
> You can reduce boot time by reducing the number of services and
> applications started at boot. These programs also slow down overall system
> speed, since Win2K/XP is continually switching from one program to
> another.
>
> Explorer and Active Desktop really slow down the system. Explorer should
> be used only for web-browsing (or not at all), since most of what it does
> can be done by knowing how to use the file manager and/or shortcuts on a
> plain desktop.
>
> Active Desktop adds bells and whistles which you generally don't need,
> such as pretty pictures in the background - displaying these, redrawing
> them as you open and close windows, and so on, takes an astonishing amount
> of computing power.
>
> In fact, most of the computer's computing time is spent displaying the
> user interface and interacting with the user - the "real work" takes very
> little computing power compared to those tasks. A conservative estimate is
> that your computer spends up to 25% of its time on the user interface, up
> to 5% of its time doing useful work, and 70% or more of its time doing
> nothing. That is, when you are actually using it...
>
> HTH&GL
Anonymous
November 9, 2004 10:36:33 PM

Archived from groups: alt.os.windows2000,microsoft.public.windowsnt.registry,microsoft.public.windows.nt.setup (More info?)

Kylesb wrote:
[...]
> I presume you mean "Internet Explorer" should only be used for
> browsing, yet Explorer IS the file manager of the new Windows OSs. IE
> and Explorer are "integrated" applications, so I'm not certain what
> significance can be given to your recommendations as one can "browse
> the internet" from within an Explorer window. I'm uncertain as to
> whether there is a dividing line between the two applications.

As I understand it, Explorer is an interface to the file manager, which
works without it just fine. Turn off "show web content", and you'll see
what I mean. Court judgements forced MS to change the integration of
Explorer into the OS, so it's not necessary to use Explorer, not for
file management, not for web browsing. You can even get rid of, but MS
doesn't like you to do that, and it's not easy. Just don't run it.

BTW, I just clicked "Show Web Content", and immediately got a request to
permit Explorer to access the Internet (my firewall blocks all attempts
at connection to the Internet by default.) I switched off Show Web
Content, of course: if IE has web page open, the machine is vulnerable.

> | Active Desktop adds bells and whistles which you generally don't
> need,
> | such as pretty pictures in the background - displaying these,
> redrawing
> | them as you open and close windows, and so on, takes an astonishing
> | amount of computing power.
[...]

> Unless you are playing games or editing videos. most systems are
> running the idle task 98 or 99 % of the time. I use this same
> computer every day for work purposes, email, documents, spreadsheets,
> web browsing, and task manager indicates for the systems "processes"
> the idle process has used 99% of the CPU over a 500 hour period of up
> time.

We are saying the same thing, but from different angles.

To get back to your boot problem: have you found out which services are
started at boot up? Click Settings - Control Panel - Administrative
Tools (Win2K, it's a little different for XP), and you will find a
Services Icon. When you open that panel. All services set to "automatic"
start when you boot or when a program needs them. There are a number you
do not need, such as indexing. I've got a list somewhere, put it in a
Really Logical Place, so I can't find it. :-(

Here's the services list from my system. The items labeled "Disabled"
would otherwise start at boot. The items labeled "manual" will start
only if you set them to automatic. You can start any service labelled
"manual"; it will not start otherwise. "Automatic" services are started
at boot or when needed (eg, the services related to the Internet start
automatically because Windows detects the need for them.) My machine
runs fine with the setup shown. Studying it should help you decide what
you can turn off on your machine.

HTH&GL

...................................................................................
Name Description Status Startup Type Log On As

Alerter Notifies selected users and computers of administrative
alerts. Started Automatic LocalSystem

Application Management Provides software installation services such as
Assign, Publish, and Remove. Started Manual LocalSystem

Automatic Updates Enables the download and installation of critical
Windows updates. If the service is disabled, the operating system can be
manually updated at the Windows Update Web site. Manual LocalSystem

AVG6 Service Started Automatic LocalSystem

Background Intelligent Transfer Service Transfers files in the
background using idle network bandwidth. If the service is disabled,
then any functions that depend on BITS, such as Windows Update or MSN
Explorer will be unable to automatically download programs and other
information. Manual LocalSystem

ClipBook Supports ClipBook Viewer, which allows pages to be seen by
remote ClipBooks. Disabled LocalSystem

COM+ Event System Provides automatic distribution of events to
subscribing COM components. Started Manual LocalSystem

Computer Browser Maintains an up-to-date list of computers on your
network and supplies the list to programs that request it. Manual
LocalSystem

DHCP Client Manages network configuration by registering and updating IP
addresses and DNS names. Started Automatic LocalSystem

Distributed Link Tracking Client Sends notifications of files moving
between NTFS volumes in a network domain. Disabled LocalSystem

Distributed Transaction Coordinator Coordinates transactions that are
distributed across two or more databases, message queues, file systems,
or other transaction protected resource managers. Manual LocalSystem

DNS Client Resolves and caches Domain Name System (DNS) names.
Started Automatic LocalSystem

Event Log Logs event messages issued by programs and Windows. Event Log
reports contain information that can be useful in diagnosing problems.
Reports are viewed in Event Viewer. Started Automatic LocalSystem

Fax Service Helps you send and receive faxes Manual LocalSystem

Indexing Service Indexes contents and properties of files on local and
remote computers; provides rapid access to files through flexible
querying language. Manual LocalSystem

Internet Connection Sharing Provides network address translation,
addressing, and name resolution services for all computers on your home
network through a dial-up connection. Started Automatic LocalSystem

IPSEC Policy Agent Manages IP security policy and starts the
ISAKMP/Oakley (IKE) and the IP security driver. Started Automatic
LocalSystem

Logical Disk Manager Logical Disk Manager Watchdog Service Started
Automatic LocalSystem

Logical Disk Manager Administrative Service Administrative service for
disk management requests Manual LocalSystem

Messenger Sends and receives messages transmitted by administrators or
by the Alerter service. Disabled LocalSystem

Net Logon Supports pass-through authentication of account logon events
for computers in a domain. Manual LocalSystem

NetMeeting Remote Desktop Sharing Allows authorized people to remotely
access your Windows desktop using
NetMeeting. Manual LocalSystem

Network Connections Manages objects in the Network and Dial-Up
Connections folder, in which you can view both local area network and
remote connections. Started Manual LocalSystem

Network DDE Provides network transport and security for dynamic data
exchange (DDE). Manual LocalSystem

Network DDE DSDM Manages shared dynamic data exchange and is used by
Network DDE Manual LocalSystem

NT LM Security Support Provider Provides security to remote procedure
call (RPC) programs that use transports other than named pipes. Manual
LocalSystem

Panda anti-virus service Manual LocalSystem

Performance Logs and Alerts Configures performance logs and alerts.
Manual LocalSystem

Plug and Play Manages device installation and configuration and notifies
programs of device changes. Started Automatic LocalSystem

Portable Media Serial Number Service Retrieves the serial number of any
portable media player connected to this computer. If this service is
stopped, protected content might not be down loaded to the device.
Manual LocalSystem

PPPoE Service Started Automatic LocalSystem

Print Spooler Loads files to memory for later printing. Started
Automatic LocalSystem

Protected Storage Provides protected storage for sensitive data, such as
private keys, to prevent access by unauthorized services, processes,
or users. Started Automatic LocalSystem

QoS RSVP Provides network signaling and local traffic control setup
functionality for QoS-aware programs and control applets. Manual
LocalSystem

Remote Access Auto Connection Manager Creates a connection to a remote
network whenever a program references a remote DNS or NetBIOS name or
address. Started Automatic LocalSystem

Remote Access Connection Manager Creates a network connection.
Started Manual LocalSystem

Remote Procedure Call (RPC) Provides the endpoint mapper and other
miscellaneous RPC services. Started Automatic LocalSystem

Remote Procedure Call (RPC) Locator Manages the RPC name service
database. Manual LocalSystem

Remote Registry Service Allows remote registry manipulation. Manual
LocalSystem

Removable Storage Manages removable media, drives, and libraries.
Manual LocalSystem

Routing and Remote Access Offers routing services to businesses in local
area and wide area network environments. Disabled LocalSystem

RunAs Service Enables starting processes under alternate credentials
Started Automatic LocalSystem

Security Accounts Manager Stores security information for local user
accounts. Started Automatic LocalSystem

Server Provides RPC support and file, print, and named pipe sharing.
Started Automatic LocalSystem

Smart Card Manages and controls access to a smart card inserted into a
smart card reader attached to the computer. Manual LocalSystem

Smart Card Helper Provides support for legacy smart card readers
attached to the computer. Manual LocalSystem

Still Image Service Manual LocalSystem

System Event Notification Tracks system events such as Windows logon,
network, and power events. Notifies COM+ Event System subscribers of
these events. Started Automatic LocalSystem

Task Scheduler Enables a program to run at a designated time. Started
Automatic LocalSystem

TCP/IP NetBIOS Helper Service Enables support for NetBIOS over TCP/IP
(NetBT) service and NetBIOS name resolution. Disabled LocalSystem

Telephony Provides Telephony API (TAPI) support for programs that
control telephony devices and IP based voice connections on the local
computer and, through the LAN, on servers that are also running the
service. Started Manual LocalSystem

Telnet Allows a remote user to log on to the system and run console
programs using the command line. Manual LocalSystem

TrueVector Internet Monitor Monitors internet traffic and generates
alerts for disallowed access. Started Automatic LocalSystem

Uninterruptible Power Supply Manages an uninterruptible power supply
(UPS) connected to the computer. Manual LocalSystem

Utility Manager Starts and configures accessibility tools from one
window Manual LocalSystem

Windows Installer Installs, repairs and removes software according to
instructions contained in .MSI files. Manual LocalSystem

Windows Management Instrumentation Provides system management
information. Started Automatic LocalSystem

Windows Management Instrumentation Driver Extensions Provides systems
management information to and from drivers. Started Manual LocalSystem

Windows Time Sets the computer clock. Manual LocalSystem

Wireless Configuration Provides authenticated network access control
using IEEE 802.1x for wired and wireless
Ethernet networks. Manual LocalSystem

Workstation Provides network connections and communications. Started
Automatic LocalSystem
Anonymous
November 10, 2004 7:49:30 AM

Archived from groups: alt.os.windows2000,microsoft.public.windowsnt.registry,microsoft.public.windows.nt.setup (More info?)

"Wolf Kirchmeir" <wwolfkir@sympatico.ca> wrote in message
news:Cndkd.20860$km5.998879@news20.bellglobal.com...
| Kylesb wrote:
| [...]
| > I presume you mean "Internet Explorer" should only be used for
| > browsing, yet Explorer IS the file manager of the new Windows OSs.
IE
| > and Explorer are "integrated" applications, so I'm not certain
what
| > significance can be given to your recommendations as one can
"browse
| > the internet" from within an Explorer window. I'm uncertain as to
| > whether there is a dividing line between the two applications.
|
| As I understand it, Explorer is an interface to the file manager,
which
| works without it just fine. Turn off "show web content", and you'll
see
| what I mean. Court judgements forced MS to change the integration of
| Explorer into the OS, so it's not necessary to use Explorer, not for
| file management, not for web browsing. You can even get rid of, but
MS
| doesn't like you to do that, and it's not easy. Just don't run it.

I'll say it again, Explorer IS the file manager program for win2k, not
an "interface" thereto. Further, you can have active desktop disabled
and "show web content" disabled, yet still be able to magically
transform a dumbed down explorer window (e.g., I have 1 folder on my
desktop named "all my stuff" that contains only program shortcuts or
folders having program shortcuts therein, I use this system to keep my
desktop cleaned up) into an IE web browser window like so: "enable"
the "standard" toolbar by merely right-clicking on the Explorer menu
and enabling "standard buttons". Further, with the standard buttons
toolbar enabled, the "internet favorites" will now appear as an item
in the standard toolbar, and one can mouse-click on an internet
favorite, and voila, your Explorer window that was providing a folder
view is now displaying an internet page. The bottom line is Explorer
and IE are still tightly integrated in win2k, don't let the unsettled
dust of an anti-trust lawsuit fool you into believing something
different from what your eyes may perceive.

Here is one way to "test" the above:

1. Create a folder on your desktop and double click on it, this will
open a single pane Explorer window. Disable active desktop and web
content for the folder (if not already disabled).

2 open up the computer management console and view the System
Information/Software Environment/Running Tasks info and make note of
the Explorer tasks running and their process IDs.

3. Right click the menu area in your opened Explorer folder whose
contents are shown in an Explorer window, enable the "standard
buttons" then find the internet favorites menu items and click on a
web page link, the web page opens in the existing Explorer window.

4. Refresh the view of the "running tasks" list, you'll see that the
process IDs for Explorer are unchanged, yet what was an Explorer
folder view window is now magically an IE web browser window, proof
positive that Explorer and IE are one and the same.

Now, if you are still a non-believer in what I say, click the "back"
button on the std toolbar, disable the std toolbar and tell me if you
see the original Explorer view of your desktop folder, now check the
process IDs for Explorer, still unchanged eh?

Here's an easier one: open IE and type the following in the "address"
bar text box: "c:\" . Now, press "enter" and your IE window will
magically transform into an Explorer window without ever being closed.

Anyone still think that IE and Explorer are not "tightly integrated"?

|
| BTW, I just clicked "Show Web Content", and immediately got a
request to
| permit Explorer to access the Internet (my firewall blocks all
attempts
| at connection to the Internet by default.) I switched off Show Web
| Content, of course: if IE has web page open, the machine is
vulnerable.
|
| > | Active Desktop adds bells and whistles which you generally don't
| > need,
| > | such as pretty pictures in the background - displaying these,
| > redrawing
| > | them as you open and close windows, and so on, takes an
astonishing
| > | amount of computing power.
| [...]
|
| > Unless you are playing games or editing videos. most systems are
| > running the idle task 98 or 99 % of the time. I use this same
| > computer every day for work purposes, email, documents,
spreadsheets,
| > web browsing, and task manager indicates for the systems
"processes"
| > the idle process has used 99% of the CPU over a 500 hour period of
up
| > time.
|
| We are saying the same thing, but from different angles.
|

Perhaps. I only made that comment b/c your estimates were inaccurate,
remarkably, the idle task runs nearly all of the time on most
machines.

--
Best regards,
Kyle
Anonymous
November 10, 2004 12:45:11 PM

Archived from groups: alt.os.windows2000,microsoft.public.windowsnt.registry,microsoft.public.windows.nt.setup (More info?)

Doesn't anybody listen anymore???

I said it's friggin w2k sniffing other partitions. It aint no friggin
normal services firing up AVG or indexing whatever. I know all about
services. I switch all the cruddy ones off. ALWAYS.

Just admit you have no idea and stop wasting my time. Good grief - I'm
beginning to think you may be MS shills after all the reddherrings and
straw men I get in reply to my query!

Thanks but no thanks.

My O/P is very clear and details the problem exactly.

roy




On Tue, 09 Nov 2004 19:36:33 -0500, Wolf Kirchmeir wrote:

> Kylesb wrote:
> [...]
>> I presume you mean "Internet Explorer" should only be used for browsing,
>> yet Explorer IS the file manager of the new Windows OSs. IE and
>> Explorer are "integrated" applications, so I'm not certain what
>> significance can be given to your recommendations as one can "browse the
>> internet" from within an Explorer window. I'm uncertain as to whether
>> there is a dividing line between the two applications.
>
> As I understand it, Explorer is an interface to the file manager, which
> works without it just fine. Turn off "show web content", and you'll see
> what I mean. Court judgements forced MS to change the integration of
> Explorer into the OS, so it's not necessary to use Explorer, not for file
> management, not for web browsing. You can even get rid of, but MS doesn't
> like you to do that, and it's not easy. Just don't run it.
>
> BTW, I just clicked "Show Web Content", and immediately got a request to
> permit Explorer to access the Internet (my firewall blocks all attempts at
> connection to the Internet by default.) I switched off Show Web Content,
> of course: if IE has web page open, the machine is vulnerable.
>
>> | Active Desktop adds bells and whistles which you generally don't
>> need,
>> | such as pretty pictures in the background - displaying these,
>> redrawing
>> | them as you open and close windows, and so on, takes an astonishing
>> | amount of computing power.
> [...]
>
>> Unless you are playing games or editing videos. most systems are running
>> the idle task 98 or 99 % of the time. I use this same computer every
>> day for work purposes, email, documents, spreadsheets, web browsing, and
>> task manager indicates for the systems "processes" the idle process has
>> used 99% of the CPU over a 500 hour period of up time.
>
> We are saying the same thing, but from different angles.
>
> To get back to your boot problem: have you found out which services are
> started at boot up? Click Settings - Control Panel - Administrative Tools
> (Win2K, it's a little different for XP), and you will find a Services
> Icon. When you open that panel. All services set to "automatic" start when
> you boot or when a program needs them. There are a number you do not need,
> such as indexing. I've got a list somewhere, put it in a Really Logical
> Place, so I can't find it. :-(
>
> Here's the services list from my system. The items labeled "Disabled"
> would otherwise start at boot. The items labeled "manual" will start only
> if you set them to automatic. You can start any service labelled "manual";
> it will not start otherwise. "Automatic" services are started at boot or
> when needed (eg, the services related to the Internet start automatically
> because Windows detects the need for them.) My machine runs fine with the
> setup shown. Studying it should help you decide what you can turn off on
> your machine.
>
> HTH&GL
>
> ..................................................................................
> Name Description Status Startup Type Log On As
>
> Alerter Notifies selected users and computers of administrative alerts.
> Started Automatic LocalSystem
>
> Application Management Provides software installation services such as
> Assign, Publish, and Remove. Started Manual LocalSystem
>
> Automatic Updates Enables the download and installation of critical
> Windows updates. If the service is disabled, the operating system can be
> manually updated at the Windows Update Web site. Manual LocalSystem
>
> AVG6 Service Started Automatic LocalSystem
>
> Background Intelligent Transfer Service Transfers files in the background
> using idle network bandwidth. If the service is disabled, then any
> functions that depend on BITS, such as Windows Update or MSN Explorer will
> be unable to automatically download programs and other information.
> Manual LocalSystem
>
> ClipBook Supports ClipBook Viewer, which allows pages to be seen by remote
> ClipBooks. Disabled LocalSystem
>
> COM+ Event System Provides automatic distribution of events to subscribing
> COM components. Started Manual LocalSystem
>
> Computer Browser Maintains an up-to-date list of computers on your network
> and supplies the list to programs that request it. Manual LocalSystem
>
> DHCP Client Manages network configuration by registering and updating IP
> addresses and DNS names. Started Automatic LocalSystem
>
> Distributed Link Tracking Client Sends notifications of files moving
> between NTFS volumes in a network domain. Disabled LocalSystem
>
> Distributed Transaction Coordinator Coordinates transactions that are
> distributed across two or more databases, message queues, file systems, or
> other transaction protected resource managers. Manual LocalSystem
>
> DNS Client Resolves and caches Domain Name System (DNS) names. Started
> Automatic LocalSystem
>
> Event Log Logs event messages issued by programs and Windows. Event Log
> reports contain information that can be useful in diagnosing problems.
> Reports are viewed in Event Viewer. Started Automatic LocalSystem
>
> Fax Service Helps you send and receive faxes Manual LocalSystem
>
> Indexing Service Indexes contents and properties of files on local and
> remote computers; provides rapid access to files through flexible querying
> language. Manual LocalSystem
>
> Internet Connection Sharing Provides network address translation,
> addressing, and name resolution services for all computers on your home
> network through a dial-up connection. Started Automatic LocalSystem
>
> IPSEC Policy Agent Manages IP security policy and starts the ISAKMP/Oakley
> (IKE) and the IP security driver. Started Automatic LocalSystem
>
> Logical Disk Manager Logical Disk Manager Watchdog Service Started
> Automatic LocalSystem
>
> Logical Disk Manager Administrative Service Administrative service for
> disk management requests Manual LocalSystem
>
> Messenger Sends and receives messages transmitted by administrators or by
> the Alerter service. Disabled LocalSystem
>
> Net Logon Supports pass-through authentication of account logon events for
> computers in a domain. Manual LocalSystem
>
> NetMeeting Remote Desktop Sharing Allows authorized people to remotely
> access your Windows desktop using
> NetMeeting. Manual LocalSystem
>
> Network Connections Manages objects in the Network and Dial-Up Connections
> folder, in which you can view both local area network and remote
> connections. Started Manual LocalSystem
>
> Network DDE Provides network transport and security for dynamic data
> exchange (DDE). Manual LocalSystem
>
> Network DDE DSDM Manages shared dynamic data exchange and is used by
> Network DDE Manual LocalSystem
>
> NT LM Security Support Provider Provides security to remote procedure call
> (RPC) programs that use transports other than named pipes. Manual
> LocalSystem
>
> Panda anti-virus service Manual LocalSystem
>
> Performance Logs and Alerts Configures performance logs and alerts. Manual
> LocalSystem
>
> Plug and Play Manages device installation and configuration and notifies
> programs of device changes. Started Automatic LocalSystem
>
> Portable Media Serial Number Service Retrieves the serial number of any
> portable media player connected to this computer. If this service is
> stopped, protected content might not be down loaded to the device. Manual
> LocalSystem
>
> PPPoE Service Started Automatic LocalSystem
>
> Print Spooler Loads files to memory for later printing. Started Automatic
> LocalSystem
>
> Protected Storage Provides protected storage for sensitive data, such as
> private keys, to prevent access by unauthorized services, processes, or
> users. Started Automatic LocalSystem
>
> QoS RSVP Provides network signaling and local traffic control setup
> functionality for QoS-aware programs and control applets. Manual
> LocalSystem
>
> Remote Access Auto Connection Manager Creates a connection to a remote
> network whenever a program references a remote DNS or NetBIOS name or
> address. Started Automatic LocalSystem
>
> Remote Access Connection Manager Creates a network connection. Started
> Manual LocalSystem
>
> Remote Procedure Call (RPC) Provides the endpoint mapper and other
> miscellaneous RPC services. Started Automatic LocalSystem
>
> Remote Procedure Call (RPC) Locator Manages the RPC name service database.
> Manual LocalSystem
>
> Remote Registry Service Allows remote registry manipulation. Manual
> LocalSystem
>
> Removable Storage Manages removable media, drives, and libraries. Manual
> LocalSystem
>
> Routing and Remote Access Offers routing services to businesses in local
> area and wide area network environments. Disabled LocalSystem
>
> RunAs Service Enables starting processes under alternate credentials
> Started Automatic LocalSystem
>
> Security Accounts Manager Stores security information for local user
> accounts. Started Automatic LocalSystem
>
> Server Provides RPC support and file, print, and named pipe sharing.
> Started Automatic LocalSystem
>
> Smart Card Manages and controls access to a smart card inserted into a
> smart card reader attached to the computer. Manual LocalSystem
>
> Smart Card Helper Provides support for legacy smart card readers attached
> to the computer. Manual LocalSystem
>
> Still Image Service Manual LocalSystem
>
> System Event Notification Tracks system events such as Windows logon,
> network, and power events. Notifies COM+ Event System subscribers of
> these events. Started Automatic LocalSystem
>
> Task Scheduler Enables a program to run at a designated time. Started
> Automatic LocalSystem
>
> TCP/IP NetBIOS Helper Service Enables support for NetBIOS over TCP/IP
> (NetBT) service and NetBIOS name resolution. Disabled LocalSystem
>
> Telephony Provides Telephony API (TAPI) support for programs that control
> telephony devices and IP based voice connections on the local computer
> and, through the LAN, on servers that are also running the service.
> Started Manual LocalSystem
>
> Telnet Allows a remote user to log on to the system and run console
> programs using the command line. Manual LocalSystem
>
> TrueVector Internet Monitor Monitors internet traffic and generates alerts
> for disallowed access. Started Automatic LocalSystem
>
> Uninterruptible Power Supply Manages an uninterruptible power supply (UPS)
> connected to the computer. Manual LocalSystem
>
> Utility Manager Starts and configures accessibility tools from one window
> Manual LocalSystem
>
> Windows Installer Installs, repairs and removes software according to
> instructions contained in .MSI files. Manual LocalSystem
>
> Windows Management Instrumentation Provides system management information.
> Started Automatic LocalSystem
>
> Windows Management Instrumentation Driver Extensions Provides systems
> management information to and from drivers. Started Manual LocalSystem
>
> Windows Time Sets the computer clock. Manual LocalSystem
>
> Wireless Configuration Provides authenticated network access control using
> IEEE 802.1x for wired and wireless Ethernet networks. Manual LocalSystem
>
> Workstation Provides network connections and communications. Started
> Automatic LocalSystem
Anonymous
November 10, 2004 1:18:11 PM

Archived from groups: alt.os.windows2000,microsoft.public.windowsnt.registry,microsoft.public.windows.nt.setup (More info?)

"webbie" <grinch_webster@nomail.invalid> wrote in message
news:p an.2004.11.10.09.45.07.394070@nomail.invalid...
| Doesn't anybody listen anymore???
|
| I said it's friggin w2k sniffing other partitions. It aint no
friggin
| normal services firing up AVG or indexing whatever. I know all about
| services. I switch all the cruddy ones off. ALWAYS.
|
| Just admit you have no idea and stop wasting my time. Good grief -
I'm
| beginning to think you may be MS shills after all the reddherrings
and
| straw men I get in reply to my query!
|
| Thanks but no thanks.
|
| My O/P is very clear and details the problem exactly.
|
| roy
|


Get Filemon from www.Sysinternals.com and make it a startup item if
you want to diagnose what the HD activity might be attributable to. I
recommend you disable your other startup items to make certain Filemon
is the only startup process.

Sorry to have mucked up your thread, heh.

--
Best regards,
Kyle
Anonymous
November 10, 2004 1:25:09 PM

Archived from groups: alt.os.windows2000,microsoft.public.windowsnt.registry,microsoft.public.windows.nt.setup (More info?)

Must correct my errors below.

--
Best regards,
Kyle
"Kylesb" <me@privacy.net> wrote in message
news:2ve6h7F2jsc8lU1@uni-berlin.de...
| "Wolf Kirchmeir" <wwolfkir@sympatico.ca> wrote in message
| news:Cndkd.20860$km5.998879@news20.bellglobal.com...
| | Kylesb wrote:
| | [...]
| | > I presume you mean "Internet Explorer" should only be used for
| | > browsing, yet Explorer IS the file manager of the new Windows
OSs.
| IE
| | > and Explorer are "integrated" applications, so I'm not certain
| what
| | > significance can be given to your recommendations as one can
| "browse
| | > the internet" from within an Explorer window. I'm uncertain as
to
| | > whether there is a dividing line between the two applications.
| |
| | As I understand it, Explorer is an interface to the file manager,
| which
| | works without it just fine. Turn off "show web content", and
you'll
| see
| | what I mean. Court judgements forced MS to change the integration
of
| | Explorer into the OS, so it's not necessary to use Explorer, not
for
| | file management, not for web browsing. You can even get rid of,
but
| MS
| | doesn't like you to do that, and it's not easy. Just don't run it.
|
| I'll say it again, Explorer IS the file manager program for win2k,
not
| an "interface" thereto. Further, you can have active desktop
disabled
| and "show web content" disabled, yet still be able to magically
| transform a dumbed down explorer window (e.g., I have 1 folder on my
| desktop named "all my stuff" that contains only program shortcuts or
| folders having program shortcuts therein, I use this system to keep
my
| desktop cleaned up) into an IE web browser window like so: "enable"
| the "standard" toolbar by merely right-clicking on the Explorer menu
| and enabling "standard buttons". Further, with the standard buttons
| toolbar enabled, the "internet favorites" will now appear as an item
| in the standard toolbar, and one can mouse-click on an internet
| favorite, and voila, your Explorer window that was providing a
folder
| view is now displaying an internet page. The bottom line is
Explorer
| and IE are still tightly integrated in win2k, don't let the
unsettled
| dust of an anti-trust lawsuit fool you into believing something
| different from what your eyes may perceive.
|
| Here is one way to "test" the above:
|
| 1. Create a folder on your desktop and double click on it, this will
| open a single pane Explorer window. Disable active desktop and web
| content for the folder (if not already disabled).
|
| 2 open up the computer management console and view the System
| Information/Software Environment/Running Tasks info and make note of
| the Explorer tasks running and their process IDs.
|
| 3. Right click the menu area in your opened Explorer folder whose
| contents are shown in an Explorer window, enable the "standard
| buttons" then find the internet favorites menu items and click on a
| web page link, the web page opens in the existing Explorer window.
|
| 4. Refresh the view of the "running tasks" list, you'll see that the
| process IDs for Explorer are unchanged, yet what was an Explorer
| folder view window is now magically an IE web browser window, proof
| positive that Explorer and IE are one and the same.
|
| Now, if you are still a non-believer in what I say, click the "back"
| button on the std toolbar, disable the std toolbar and tell me if
you
| see the original Explorer view of your desktop folder, now check the
| process IDs for Explorer, still unchanged eh?
|
| Here's an easier one: open IE and type the following in the
"address"
| bar text box: "c:\" . Now, press "enter" and your IE window will
| magically transform into an Explorer window without ever being
closed.
|
| Anyone still think that IE and Explorer are not "tightly
integrated"?

Hehe, now that it's not so late at night and I'm awake, I see that
"favorites" is a menu entry in any Explorer menu, so one need not
enable the standary toolbar to do what I'm describing in this post.
Anonymous
November 10, 2004 1:39:25 PM

Archived from groups: alt.os.windows2000,microsoft.public.windowsnt.registry,microsoft.public.windows.nt.setup (More info?)

Kylesb wrote:
[...]
> I'll say it again, Explorer IS the file manager program for win2k, not
> an "interface" thereto. Further, you can have active desktop disabled
> and "show web content" disabled, yet still be able to magically
> transform a dumbed down explorer window (e.g., I have 1 folder on my
> desktop named "all my stuff" that contains only program shortcuts or
> folders having program shortcuts therein, I use this system to keep my
> desktop cleaned up) into an IE web browser window like so: "enable"
> the "standard" toolbar by merely right-clicking on the Explorer menu
> and enabling "standard buttons". Further, with the standard buttons
> toolbar enabled, the "internet favorites" will now appear as an item
> in the standard toolbar, and one can mouse-click on an internet
> favorite, and voila, your Explorer window that was providing a folder
> view is now displaying an internet page. The bottom line is Explorer
> and IE are still tightly integrated in win2k, don't let the unsettled
> dust of an anti-trust lawsuit fool you into believing something
> different from what your eyes may perceive.

Well, I think we're talking past each other - using different terms for
same functions and same words for different functions. That function you
just described is an interface function in my parlance, since it changes
the look and feel of the window (why a window should like an Internet
page is a something I've never fathomed. But then, I don't buy vinyl
stickers to make my sedan look like a sports car either. :-))

Net capability is not a file manager function in my parlance, either,
and, again, I fail to see why a file manager should be able to access
the 'net. Dangerous, that, it's one of the main holes by which viruses
and other such trash enter your computer.

But there's no point in quibbling about this. Bottom line is that those
functions just slow down the system, and I don't use them. I think one
should be able to turn them off permanently. IOW, since I don't use IE,
I should be able to get rid of it totally, including its connections
with the file manager. I can only get rid of it partially, since it is
"integrated" with W2K (which I never denied, BTW.)

Anyhow, if you want a faster system, turn off as many of those add-ons
as possible. Stick with the basic file-manager functions, and ignore all
that pretty stuff - it's not needed.

Now if there was a way to eliminate My Documents and all those other
default folders, I'd be really happy. Then I wouldn't have to tell some
dumb-ass program _not_ to use those defaults. I want to set up folders
my way, not MS's way. Got a fix for that? What really frosts me is that
I can't even move them off my desktop into an "I don't need this junk"
folder. Bah!
Anonymous
November 10, 2004 1:56:28 PM

Archived from groups: alt.os.windows2000,microsoft.public.windowsnt.registry,microsoft.public.windows.nt.setup (More info?)

webbie wrote:
> Doesn't anybody listen anymore???
>
> I said it's friggin w2k sniffing other partitions. [snip]

Well, sure, but the question is why. If it's jsut trying to find them to
decide which are accessible, it shouldn't take that long. It does
exactly the same thing every time open My Computer, and then it also
reads the directories and sorts tme for display, which adds time, yet it
still takes only 5-10 seocnds on my machine (7 partitions, of which 2
are NTFS and one is FAT 16; the others areblank or other OSs).

IMO, something else is going on. I suggested it was your firewall and
A/V software doing stuff, since that what mine does: I installed Panda
(free version), and boot now takes about 1 minute longer - Panda is
scanning for viruses on boot, which is its default. HD is buzzing like
an drunken bee while this is going on.

When this W2K was a fresh install (before misc. software was installed)
boot took about 30 seconds. Then afger instralling a variety of apps,
and before Panda, it took about 2 minutes. It now takes about 3 minutes.
That should tell you something.
Anonymous
November 10, 2004 5:36:29 PM

Archived from groups: alt.os.windows2000,microsoft.public.windowsnt.registry,microsoft.public.windows.nt.setup (More info?)

"Wolf Kirchmeir" <wwolfkir@sympatico.ca> wrote in message
news:wBqkd.24534$km5.1205486@news20.bellglobal.com...
| Anyhow, if you want a faster system, turn off as many of those
add-ons
| as possible. Stick with the basic file-manager functions, and ignore
all
| that pretty stuff - it's not needed.
|
| Now if there was a way to eliminate My Documents and all those other
| default folders, I'd be really happy. Then I wouldn't have to tell
some
| dumb-ass program _not_ to use those defaults. I want to set up
folders
| my way, not MS's way. Got a fix for that? What really frosts me is
that
| I can't even move them off my desktop into an "I don't need this
junk"
| folder. Bah!


I'm in total agreement with these statements, lol.

--
Best regards,
Kyle
Anonymous
November 10, 2004 6:29:44 PM

Archived from groups: alt.os.windows2000,microsoft.public.windowsnt.registry,microsoft.public.windows.nt.setup (More info?)

On Wed, 10 Nov 2004 14:36:29 -0500, "Kylesb" <me@privacy.net> wrote:

>"Wolf Kirchmeir" <wwolfkir@sympatico.ca> wrote in message
>news:wBqkd.24534$km5.1205486@news20.bellglobal.com...
>| Anyhow, if you want a faster system, turn off as many of those
>add-ons
>| as possible. Stick with the basic file-manager functions, and ignore
>all
>| that pretty stuff - it's not needed.
>|
>| Now if there was a way to eliminate My Documents and all those other
>| default folders, I'd be really happy. Then I wouldn't have to tell
>some
>| dumb-ass program _not_ to use those defaults. I want to set up
>folders
>| my way, not MS's way. Got a fix for that? What really frosts me is
>that
>| I can't even move them off my desktop into an "I don't need this
>junk"
>| folder. Bah!
>
>
>I'm in total agreement with these statements, lol.

You can move "My Documents" to the recycle bin. It's one of the first
things I do after installing Windows.

As to the programs' defaults, some can be changed by changing "start
in" in the program's properties. Anyway it should stay when you change
it (when saving a file from the program).

I never use any of the "My*" folders (which should still be called
'directories' like they used to be. 'Folders' sounds like UN-progress)
intentionally.

--
45 days until the winter solstice celebration

"In all affairs it's a healthy thing now and then to
hang a question mark on the things you have long taken
for granted." -- Bertrand Russell
Anonymous
November 11, 2004 10:01:38 PM

Archived from groups: alt.os.windows2000,microsoft.public.windowsnt.registry,microsoft.public.windows.nt.setup (More info?)

On Wed, 10 Nov 2004 10:56:28 -0500, Wolf Kirchmeir wrote:

> webbie wrote:
>> Doesn't anybody listen anymore???
>>
>> I said it's friggin w2k sniffing other partitions. [snip]
>
> Well, sure, but the question is why. If it's jsut trying to find them to
> decide which are accessible, it shouldn't take that long. It does exactly
> the same thing every time open My Computer, and then it also reads the
> directories and sorts tme for display, which adds time, yet it still takes
> only 5-10 seocnds on my machine (7 partitions, of which 2 are NTFS and one
> is FAT 16; the others areblank or other OSs).
>
> IMO, something else is going on. I suggested it was your firewall and A/V
> software doing stuff, since that what mine does: I installed Panda (free
> version), and boot now takes about 1 minute longer - Panda is scanning for
> viruses on boot, which is its default. HD is buzzing like an drunken bee
> while this is going on.
>
> When this W2K was a fresh install (before misc. software was installed)
> boot took about 30 seconds. Then afger instralling a variety of apps, and
> before Panda, it took about 2 minutes. It now takes about 3 minutes.
> That should tell you something.

I appreciate what you say and I will uninstall all that stuff BUT
I don't get this problem with xp but I don't want xp. I want to
fix 2000. Because this head thrashing does not happen with xp (same
installed apps/antivirus etc)I am of the mind that it is 2000 causing
it directly.
Anonymous
November 11, 2004 10:01:39 PM

Archived from groups: alt.os.windows2000,microsoft.public.windowsnt.registry,microsoft.public.windows.nt.setup (More info?)

webbie wrote:
[...]
>
> I appreciate what you say and I will uninstall all that stuff BUT
> I don't get this problem with xp but I don't want xp. I want to
> fix 2000. Because this head thrashing does not happen with xp (same
> installed apps/antivirus etc)I am of the mind that it is 2000 causing
> it directly.

Ah, well, the only fix is to upgrade to XP. It boots faster than W2K
because it doesn't do what W2K does during boot, is all. IIRC, it
doesn't load a whole bunch of *.dlls, etc.

Pity, but there it is.
Anonymous
November 11, 2004 10:01:40 PM

Archived from groups: alt.os.windows2000,microsoft.public.windowsnt.registry,microsoft.public.windows.nt.setup (More info?)

My 2000 Pro loads a lot faster than my XP. 2000 takes about 40 seconds to
get me the logon screen, and another 15 seconds to get the desktop loaded
and all other programs at startup after logon screen. XP takes about 5
minutes or more, and sometimes have to restart several times to get
everything to load and start right.

Larry
Unlock the Universe

"Wolf Kirchmeir" <wwolfkir@sympatico.ca> wrote in message
news:D 8Pkd.29975$Z7.983274@news20.bellglobal.com...
| webbie wrote:
| [...]
| >
| > I appreciate what you say and I will uninstall all that stuff BUT
| > I don't get this problem with xp but I don't want xp. I want to
| > fix 2000. Because this head thrashing does not happen with xp (same
| > installed apps/antivirus etc)I am of the mind that it is 2000 causing
| > it directly.
|
| Ah, well, the only fix is to upgrade to XP. It boots faster than W2K
| because it doesn't do what W2K does during boot, is all. IIRC, it
| doesn't load a whole bunch of *.dlls, etc.
|
| Pity, but there it is.
Anonymous
November 11, 2004 10:02:41 PM

Archived from groups: alt.os.windows2000,microsoft.public.windowsnt.registry,microsoft.public.windows.nt.setup (More info?)

On Wed, 10 Nov 2004 10:18:11 -0500, Kylesb wrote:

> "webbie" <grinch_webster@nomail.invalid> wrote in message
> news:p an.2004.11.10.09.45.07.394070@nomail.invalid...
> | Doesn't anybody listen anymore???
> |
> | I said it's friggin w2k sniffing other partitions. It aint no
> friggin
> | normal services firing up AVG or indexing whatever. I know all about
> | services. I switch all the cruddy ones off. ALWAYS.
> |
> | Just admit you have no idea and stop wasting my time. Good grief -
> I'm
> | beginning to think you may be MS shills after all the reddherrings
> and
> | straw men I get in reply to my query!
> |
> | Thanks but no thanks.
> |
> | My O/P is very clear and details the problem exactly.
> |
> | roy
> |
> |
>
> Get Filemon from www.Sysinternals.com and make it a startup item if you
> want to diagnose what the HD activity might be attributable to. I
> recommend you disable your other startup items to make certain Filemon is
> the only startup process.
>
> Sorry to have mucked up your thread, heh.


Thanks. I'll certainly give that a try.
Anonymous
November 12, 2004 12:11:31 AM

Archived from groups: alt.os.windows2000,microsoft.public.windowsnt.registry,microsoft.public.windows.nt.setup (More info?)

Larry Crites wrote:
> My 2000 Pro loads a lot faster than my XP. 2000 takes about 40 seconds to
> get me the logon screen, and another 15 seconds to get the desktop loaded
> and all other programs at startup after logon screen. XP takes about 5
> minutes or more, and sometimes have to restart several times to get
> everything to load and start right.
>
> Larry
> Unlock the Universe


Weird. Mebbe there should a be newsgroup "Win200/XP wierdness reports."
We could have a lot of fun competing for The Weirdest Thing Happened
With My System.
HAH!
!