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Which 4-pin connector

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December 28, 2005 1:43:48 PM

Hope someone can help me.
I have an Allied Model AL-C400ATX power supply.
The PS
included 2 4-pin power connectors. One with 2 yellow and 2 black wires.
The other with a yellow, orange, red and black wires.
I need to know which 4 pin connector do I use for an Intel pentium-4 3.6 Ghz with the Intel 945P chipset. The motherboard is an Intel D945PVS.
The spec sheet that came with the PS stated that the multi-colored (red, yellow, orange, black) is used for the Intel 915 and 925 chipsets. Do I
use this same multi-colored 4-pin connector for the 945P chipset?
Thanks so much :?

More about : pin connector

December 28, 2005 1:52:15 PM

Quote:
Hope someone can help me.
I have an Allied Model AL-C400ATX power supply.
The PS
included 2 4-pin power connectors. One with 2 yellow and 2 black wires.
The other with a yellow, orange, red and black wires.
I need to know which 4 pin connector do I use for an Intel pentium-4 3.6 Ghz with the Intel 945P chipset. The motherboard is an Intel D945PVS.
The spec sheet that came with the PS stated that the multi-colored (red, yellow, orange, black) is used for the Intel 915 and 925 chipsets. Do I
use this same multi-colored 4-pin connector for the 945P chipset?
Thanks so much :?


"included 2 4-pin power connectors. One with 2 yellow and 2 black wires"
These are two PCI Express connectors

Use the yellow, orange, red and black one for the board
December 28, 2005 4:50:21 PM

Those are not PCI-x connectors, because then they would have 6 pins (2x3).
Related resources
December 28, 2005 5:55:21 PM

If im not mistaken the multicolored 4 pin connector is for 24 pin power connection . On my power supply you can snap those 4 onto the 20 pin connector to make it a 24 pin molex .
December 28, 2005 6:12:21 PM

You're right, I'm assuming his PSU is a regular ATX12V (can't find any specs though). If there are indeed two 4-pin connectors, then one is probably the 12V and one is the connector that sits next to the 20pin. But make sure you don't confuse the two and plug them into the wrong places, because that could fry the board.

edit: clarification
December 29, 2005 1:21:40 AM

You use the lead that has ONLY yellow and black wires.
December 29, 2005 1:25:42 AM

You're trying to help him blow the thing up eh? I doubt the one with yellow, red, black, and orange wires will even fit into the ATX12v connector, but if it did, you'd definately do some damage!

The ATX12v connector has two yellow and two black wires. HEY, YELLOW IS 12V, NO WONDER THEY CALL IT AN ATX12V CONNECTION!!!

The other one he speaks of is likely a 20 to 24 pin adapter group. None are the PCI-Express connectors, which would be SIX PIN YELLOW AND BLACK.

Strike Three, you're out, please quit giving advice before you hurt someone.
December 31, 2005 5:37:07 PM

Yes-they are 2 seperate 4-pin connectors coming out of an ATX12v PSU.
They both fit onto pins 21-24 of the power header. As a matter of fact
the multi-colored connector clips onto the end of the large connector that
plugs onto pins 1-20. The other 4-pin (yellow & black) also plugs onto pins
21-24 but has a clip that slips over the end of the power header.
I powered the system up using the multi-colored connector and there
were no negative effects. The reason I took a risk with the multi-colored
connector is because the PSU spec sheet pointed out that the multi-colored
connector is for the 915 & 925 Intel chipsets. Since I have a 945 chipset,
I assume (gulp) that it would be used for that also. The support at
Intel sucks. I used their website email form to support and they give you
space for 50 characters to explain the problem. The Apex-Allied website
also has an online email form for support, but when you submit it, it times
out no matter what time of day. BTW, here are the voltages for each
4-pin connector>

Connector-1:
2-yellow wires each @ 12 volts.
2 black wires that are common.

Connector-2:
1-yellow @ 12 volts.
1-orange @ +3.3 volts.
1-red @ +5 volts.
1-black for common.

The yellow & black wired connector is also for a Pentium 4 processor.
Do you think the extra connector (yellow & black) maybe for a board
for dual processors?
Anyway-I stick with the multi-colored one for now.
December 31, 2005 7:23:29 PM

It's surprising that the yellow/black connector even fits on the extra 4 pins on the motherboard connector, but it's good that you didn't try that because that could damage the board. The yellow/black connector is to supply 12V to the CPU. On dual-cpu boards, I believe there are two of them (or one 8-pin connector), but I could be wrong.
December 31, 2005 7:50:14 PM

Gawd d00d. Chipset doesn't matter, most newer boards use the 24-pin ATX connector. The OTHER 4-pin connector, Yellow and Black only, is called ATX12v, and connects to another place on your board

Supposedly the 24-pin (that's 20+4 for you) powers everything except the CPU core. The 4-pin (ATX12v) connects to a different place and powers only the CPU core.
December 31, 2005 7:52:28 PM

Let me rephrase that: You're supposed to use BOTH of those 4-pin connectors. One clips onto the other 20-pins and plugs into the main connector. The other plugs into a different connector.
December 31, 2005 8:41:25 PM

Crashman you are so right dude. The power header for the CPU is located
behind the back shield where all of the audio, USB, etc. are located of all places. And that header is for the 4-pin 2-yellow and 2-black connector.
How in hell I missed that is beyond me (and I was sober).
Thanks
December 31, 2005 8:44:08 PM

The computer was actually working without it plugged in?
December 31, 2005 8:49:25 PM

Just the Mobo was powered, not the CPU. I didn't have anything
such as the monitor interfaced as yet as I wanted to make sure that
I didn't want to fry anything.
In other words, I was being tooooooooo careful.
Thanks all.
April 4, 2009 3:37:42 PM

This forum saved me from wasting money on a new power supply! Thanks All!

You all need not guess about which 4 plug connector goes into which socket. Just match up the published voltages!

With the Allied AL-C400 ATX power supply, yes, it does come with two 4pin connectors.

The lime green connector is for the pins(sockets) 11, 12 and 23 and 24 of the main power connector on a
24pin receptacle mainboard.

Your post above on Connector-2 shed the light!
1-yellow @ 12 volts
1-orange @ +3.3volts
1- red @ +5 volts
1-black for common (ground)

In your mainboard booklet it should show your pin socket voltages, Mine is:
Pin 23 +5 volts
Pin 24 Ground
Pin 11 +12volts
Pin 12 +3.3 volts

Plug in the lime green connector (with the ink label side toward the snap/latch side of the socket)
and you will see that the color of the wires will match the voltages above.
ie: Pin 24, Black Wire = ground
Pin 23, Red wire = +5volts
Pin 12, Orange wire = +3.3 volts
Pin 11, Yellow wire = 12volts

The remaining WHITE 4 pin plug is for the ATX Power Source connector on the mainboard and provides
+12 volts to the CPU power circuit according to my mainboard handbook.
Pin 1 +12 volts
Pin 2 +12 volts
Pin 3 Ground
Pin 4 Ground

So, there is really no guessing! I hope this info helps all.
Michael Adams, MCSE
!