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MS Office 2003 on Terminal Server 2003?

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Anonymous
August 27, 2005 1:38:52 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsnt.terminalserver.applications,microsoft.public.windowsnt.terminalserver.client,microsoft.public.windowsnt.terminalserver.connectivity,microsoft.public.windowsnt.terminalserver.domain,microsoft.public.windowsnt.terminalserver.setup (More info?)

Well, were at a cross-road here and I'm not sure how to handle this.

I have a dedicated 2003 Terminal Server server (Dual Xeon, 3GB RAM, 50
Device CAL), and want to move my remote office users into this box.

All of the remote users have Cable Internet connections with 3mbps
inbound and 512/768kbps outbound from their locations. The main office
has a 3mbps inbound and a 1mbps outbound connection - all test at the
full rated speed and never seem to falter.

All sites are connected to the main office via dedicated IPsec tunnel
appliances.

All sites currently have workstations that are part of the main offices
domain. They also have local USB attached printers, some have a single
serial port device, some users have MS Publisher installed, others
don't. All printers are shared on the network and listed in the
Directory.

Everyone in the company uses roaming profiles mapped to the main offices
server and their "My Documents" are also redirected to a share in the
main office - as you can imagine, this can be slow at times as users
profiles grow. The intent is to take them off their local boxes and run
them through RD to the TS in the main office so that their bandwidth
intensive apps and files are a non-issue (since the entire main office
has a gig backbone).

So, since we have a mix of Office XP and Office 2003 I tested the TS
server with installing the full Office XP suite (Outlook XP, Word,
Excel, PPT) and skilled Publisher. The intent is to remove all the
licensed installs of Office from all users machines to match the number
of users that will be accessing Office XP on the TS.

I have pointed everyone TS profiles to the same locations as their
roaming profiles - not sure if that's right or not.

I notice that anyone using Outlook XP can use Outlook XP installed on
the TS without any setup/change/error, but the Office 2003 users running
Outlook 2003 get an error when they open Outlook XP on the Terminal
Server - I can set them up with Outlook XP, but if they switch back to
their normal non-RD desktop and open Outlook 2003 it's broke and
requires it to be reset.

Everything else seems to work perfectly - although I was amazed at how
long it takes to print - it seems that anything they print while in TS
must be fully sent (complete file) back to their local computer before
it starts printing - and it's real slow. This would be the only issue we
have.

So, by questions:

Does it sound like I've got the right ideas -

1) mapping the TS profiles to the same locations as their roaming
profiles (since I need to have everything the same if they TS or just
login to the domain at the local computers in their offices).

2) Nothing I can do about the printing speed

3) Installing Office XP on the TS for all users and then uninstalling
Office XP and 2003 from their local machines to account for the same
number of licenses?

what would you do differently.

Thanks.


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Anonymous
August 27, 2005 3:31:32 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsnt.terminalserver.domain,microsoft.public.windowsnt.terminalserver.applications,microsoft.public.windowsnt.terminalserver.client,microsoft.public.windowsnt.terminalserver.connectivity (More info?)

1. Never share the normal profile with the terminal server profile. Use the
Terminal Server Profile path in their user account.

2. No need to uninstall Office on their workstations, as users connection
to a TS with office installed are legally licensed to use the TS Office
installation of they have a legal copy of the same or greater version of
Office on their workstation.

3. Make sure to redirect the My Documents folder to a server share on the
same network as the TS, so it does not get copied back and forth with the
users profile, and so files are not sent back & forth across the WAN.

4. There are two things you can do to improve printing performance, one is
the disable the advanced printing features on each printer:

http://www.workthin.com/images/AdvancedPrintingFeatures...

The best solution is to purchase a printing program like ThinPrint,
Provision Networks Print-IT, triCerat Simplify Printing... These programs
reduce the printing bandwidth required and allow you to connect any client
printer with the full features of the client's local driver, as they send a
EMF (TIFF Image) to the client, instead of a PCL or PostScript data. These
programs cost less than the cost of one business network laser printer, i.e.
$999-1500 per terminal server.

Citrix Presentation Server 4.0 also has an EMF Print Driver, but it costs a
lot more.

http://www.workthin.com/tsao.htm


--
Patrick Rouse
Microsoft MVP - Terminal Server
http://www.workthin.com


"Leythos" wrote:

> Well, were at a cross-road here and I'm not sure how to handle this.
>
> I have a dedicated 2003 Terminal Server server (Dual Xeon, 3GB RAM, 50
> Device CAL), and want to move my remote office users into this box.
>
> All of the remote users have Cable Internet connections with 3mbps
> inbound and 512/768kbps outbound from their locations. The main office
> has a 3mbps inbound and a 1mbps outbound connection - all test at the
> full rated speed and never seem to falter.
>
> All sites are connected to the main office via dedicated IPsec tunnel
> appliances.
>
> All sites currently have workstations that are part of the main offices
> domain. They also have local USB attached printers, some have a single
> serial port device, some users have MS Publisher installed, others
> don't. All printers are shared on the network and listed in the
> Directory.
>
> Everyone in the company uses roaming profiles mapped to the main offices
> server and their "My Documents" are also redirected to a share in the
> main office - as you can imagine, this can be slow at times as users
> profiles grow. The intent is to take them off their local boxes and run
> them through RD to the TS in the main office so that their bandwidth
> intensive apps and files are a non-issue (since the entire main office
> has a gig backbone).
>
> So, since we have a mix of Office XP and Office 2003 I tested the TS
> server with installing the full Office XP suite (Outlook XP, Word,
> Excel, PPT) and skilled Publisher. The intent is to remove all the
> licensed installs of Office from all users machines to match the number
> of users that will be accessing Office XP on the TS.
>
> I have pointed everyone TS profiles to the same locations as their
> roaming profiles - not sure if that's right or not.
>
> I notice that anyone using Outlook XP can use Outlook XP installed on
> the TS without any setup/change/error, but the Office 2003 users running
> Outlook 2003 get an error when they open Outlook XP on the Terminal
> Server - I can set them up with Outlook XP, but if they switch back to
> their normal non-RD desktop and open Outlook 2003 it's broke and
> requires it to be reset.
>
> Everything else seems to work perfectly - although I was amazed at how
> long it takes to print - it seems that anything they print while in TS
> must be fully sent (complete file) back to their local computer before
> it starts printing - and it's real slow. This would be the only issue we
> have.
>
> So, by questions:
>
> Does it sound like I've got the right ideas -
>
> 1) mapping the TS profiles to the same locations as their roaming
> profiles (since I need to have everything the same if they TS or just
> login to the domain at the local computers in their offices).
>
> 2) Nothing I can do about the printing speed
>
> 3) Installing Office XP on the TS for all users and then uninstalling
> Office XP and 2003 from their local machines to account for the same
> number of licenses?
>
> what would you do differently.
>
> Thanks.
>
>
> --
>
> spam999free@rrohio.com
> remove 999 in order to email me
>
Anonymous
August 28, 2005 12:57:17 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsnt.terminalserver.domain,microsoft.public.windowsnt.terminalserver.applications,microsoft.public.windowsnt.terminalserver.client,microsoft.public.windowsnt.terminalserver.connectivity (More info?)

In article <96603CBD-B2C2-4C48-BF02-686D33417CF9@microsoft.com>,
PatrickRouse@discussions.microsoft.com says...
> 1. Never share the normal profile with the terminal server profile. Use the
> Terminal Server Profile path in their user account.

I understood all the other items except the above. If I don't put
anything in the TS profile settings, and they already have domain
profiles, will it pull their domain settings when they log into the TS
session?

I'm very unsure in this area - so, if I setup a new location for the TS
profiles, instead of leaving it blank, and I don't point it to the same
location as their domain profiles, will changes replicate back to their
domain profiles?

(Oh, thanks for the feedback).

--

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remove 999 in order to email me
Related resources
Anonymous
August 28, 2005 12:57:18 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsnt.terminalserver.domain,microsoft.public.windowsnt.terminalserver.applications,microsoft.public.windowsnt.terminalserver.client,microsoft.public.windowsnt.terminalserver.connectivity (More info?)

If a user has a roaming profile and no terminal serverprofile location is
defined, the normal roaming profile is used. This can cause all kinds of
problems, since the workstation & server are different OS. I highly
recommend that you create a TS Profile for every user, even if it means
manually logging on for each user and setting their settings they way they
expect them to be.

Do NOT set the TS Profile location to the same location as the normal
profile, as this serves no purpose, and has the same affect as not having a
TS Profile defined.

That being said, you can use the Office CIW (Custom Installation Wizard) to
create a MST (Transform file) that defines the most important settings, i.e.
default file save locations, Outlook Email Server Settings... You can also
control these with Group Policy.

TS Profile and normal roaming profiles are entirely independent of
eachother, so a change made to one has no effect on the other.


--
Patrick Rouse
Microsoft MVP - Terminal Server
http://www.workthin.com


"Leythos" wrote:

> In article <96603CBD-B2C2-4C48-BF02-686D33417CF9@microsoft.com>,
> PatrickRouse@discussions.microsoft.com says...
> > 1. Never share the normal profile with the terminal server profile. Use the
> > Terminal Server Profile path in their user account.
>
> I understood all the other items except the above. If I don't put
> anything in the TS profile settings, and they already have domain
> profiles, will it pull their domain settings when they log into the TS
> session?
>
> I'm very unsure in this area - so, if I setup a new location for the TS
> profiles, instead of leaving it blank, and I don't point it to the same
> location as their domain profiles, will changes replicate back to their
> domain profiles?
>
> (Oh, thanks for the feedback).
>
> --
>
> spam999free@rrohio.com
> remove 999 in order to email me
>
Anonymous
August 28, 2005 1:17:18 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsnt.terminalserver.domain,microsoft.public.windowsnt.terminalserver.applications,microsoft.public.windowsnt.terminalserver.client,microsoft.public.windowsnt.terminalserver.connectivity (More info?)

In article <1BEEF6F7-D325-4325-9462-502A8CD800E2@microsoft.com>,
PatrickRouse@discussions.microsoft.com says...
> If a user has a roaming profile and no terminal serverprofile location is
> defined, the normal roaming profile is used. This can cause all kinds of
> problems, since the workstation & server are different OS. I highly
> recommend that you create a TS Profile for every user, even if it means
> manually logging on for each user and setting their settings they way they
> expect them to be.
>
> Do NOT set the TS Profile location to the same location as the normal
> profile, as this serves no purpose, and has the same affect as not having a
> TS Profile defined.
>
> That being said, you can use the Office CIW (Custom Installation Wizard) to
> create a MST (Transform file) that defines the most important settings, i.e.
> default file save locations, Outlook Email Server Settings... You can also
> control these with Group Policy.
>
> TS Profile and normal roaming profiles are entirely independent of
> eachother, so a change made to one has no effect on the other.

Thanks very much. I was thinking they were different, was sure, but was
really hoping that I could point both to the same location so that they
had the same experience in RD or Local login. I see now that I've got to
make a couple changes.

Thanks for the info - you've probably saved me future headaches.

--

spam999free@rrohio.com
remove 999 in order to email me
Anonymous
August 28, 2005 1:17:19 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsnt.terminalserver.domain,microsoft.public.windowsnt.terminalserver.applications,microsoft.public.windowsnt.terminalserver.client,microsoft.public.windowsnt.terminalserver.connectivity (More info?)

That's what I'm here for. Post back if you have any more questions. I have
most FAQs here:

http://www.workthin.com/tshta.htm

--
Patrick Rouse
Microsoft MVP - Terminal Server
http://www.workthin.com


"Leythos" wrote:

> In article <1BEEF6F7-D325-4325-9462-502A8CD800E2@microsoft.com>,
> PatrickRouse@discussions.microsoft.com says...
> > If a user has a roaming profile and no terminal serverprofile location is
> > defined, the normal roaming profile is used. This can cause all kinds of
> > problems, since the workstation & server are different OS. I highly
> > recommend that you create a TS Profile for every user, even if it means
> > manually logging on for each user and setting their settings they way they
> > expect them to be.
> >
> > Do NOT set the TS Profile location to the same location as the normal
> > profile, as this serves no purpose, and has the same affect as not having a
> > TS Profile defined.
> >
> > That being said, you can use the Office CIW (Custom Installation Wizard) to
> > create a MST (Transform file) that defines the most important settings, i.e.
> > default file save locations, Outlook Email Server Settings... You can also
> > control these with Group Policy.
> >
> > TS Profile and normal roaming profiles are entirely independent of
> > eachother, so a change made to one has no effect on the other.
>
> Thanks very much. I was thinking they were different, was sure, but was
> really hoping that I could point both to the same location so that they
> had the same experience in RD or Local login. I see now that I've got to
> make a couple changes.
>
> Thanks for the info - you've probably saved me future headaches.
>
> --
>
> spam999free@rrohio.com
> remove 999 in order to email me
>
Anonymous
August 28, 2005 2:06:35 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsnt.terminalserver.domain,microsoft.public.windowsnt.terminalserver.applications,microsoft.public.windowsnt.terminalserver.client,microsoft.public.windowsnt.terminalserver.connectivity (More info?)

In article <7726E4E9-3E99-45D5-908F-A78918A6E333@microsoft.com>,
PatrickRouse@discussions.microsoft.com says...
> That's what I'm here for. Post back if you have any more questions. I have
> most FAQs here:
>
> http://www.workthin.com/tshta.htm

I have another question - I need a PC that only allows the user to TS
into a server - much like a bootable Citrix box - something that works
with 2003 Server or SBS 2003 that doesn't need an OS, but loads it over
the network - an entire MS solution. - Got anything like that. Keyboard,
Mouse, Serial, Paralle, video - loads itself over the network, should be
very small....

Thanks

--

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remove 999 in order to email me
Anonymous
August 28, 2005 2:06:36 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsnt.terminalserver.domain,microsoft.public.windowsnt.terminalserver.applications,microsoft.public.windowsnt.terminalserver.client,microsoft.public.windowsnt.terminalserver.connectivity (More info?)

Check ThinStation or PXES, which are both free opensource linux distributions
that allow you to boot directly to an RDP or ICA Client.

http://www.workthin.com/thinclient.htm
--
Patrick Rouse
Microsoft MVP - Terminal Server
http://www.workthin.com


"Leythos" wrote:

> In article <7726E4E9-3E99-45D5-908F-A78918A6E333@microsoft.com>,
> PatrickRouse@discussions.microsoft.com says...
> > That's what I'm here for. Post back if you have any more questions. I have
> > most FAQs here:
> >
> > http://www.workthin.com/tshta.htm
>
> I have another question - I need a PC that only allows the user to TS
> into a server - much like a bootable Citrix box - something that works
> with 2003 Server or SBS 2003 that doesn't need an OS, but loads it over
> the network - an entire MS solution. - Got anything like that. Keyboard,
> Mouse, Serial, Paralle, video - loads itself over the network, should be
> very small....
>
> Thanks
>
> --
>
> spam999free@rrohio.com
> remove 999 in order to email me
>
Anonymous
August 28, 2005 8:18:11 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsnt.terminalserver.domain,microsoft.public.windowsnt.terminalserver.applications,microsoft.public.windowsnt.terminalserver.client,microsoft.public.windowsnt.terminalserver.connectivity (More info?)

In article <353AF563-DD73-42B2-969B-47DBA98B128F@microsoft.com>,
PatrickRouse@discussions.microsoft.com says...
> Check ThinStation or PXES, which are both free opensource linux distributions
> that allow you to boot directly to an RDP or ICA Client.
>
> http://www.workthin.com/thinclient.htm

Thx - will look at them.

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