Wireless router vs hard wired

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

I want to access my desktop (with a router) using my notebook (laptop) in
another room.

Putting firewall/security considerations aside, do you recommend a wireless
router or a hard wired router.

Please advise. If you could explain why you recommend one over the other
that would be great.

Thank you.

Michael
8 answers Last reply
More about wireless router hard wired
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

    Looks like if I want to roam from room to room with my laptop I want
    wireless.

    "Michael T" <anonymous@sbcglobal.net> wrote in message
    news:u4RUfiLxFHA.3112@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
    >I want to access my desktop (with a router) using my notebook (laptop) in
    >another room.
    >
    > Putting firewall/security considerations aside, do you recommend a
    > wireless router or a hard wired router.
    >
    > Please advise. If you could explain why you recommend one over the other
    > that would be great.
    >
    > Thank you.
    >
    > Michael
    >
    >
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

    One downside of wireless is file transfer speed, its nearly always better
    using wired, especially for large files.

    philip ashley

    "Michael T" <anonymous@sbcglobal.net> wrote in message
    news:eUvahaMxFHA.3740@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
    > Looks like if I want to roam from room to room with my laptop I want
    > wireless.
    >
    > "Michael T" <anonymous@sbcglobal.net> wrote in message
    > news:u4RUfiLxFHA.3112@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
    >>I want to access my desktop (with a router) using my notebook (laptop) in
    >>another room.
    >>
    >> Putting firewall/security considerations aside, do you recommend a
    >> wireless router or a hard wired router.
    >>
    >> Please advise. If you could explain why you recommend one over the other
    >> that would be great.
    >>
    >> Thank you.
    >>
    >> Michael
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

    "Philip Ashley" <philip.ashleyRE@MOVEntlworld.com> wrote in message
    news:JZM_e.2795$0w.356@newsfe5-gui.ntli.net...
    >
    > One downside of wireless is file transfer speed, its nearly always better
    > using wired, especially for large files.
    >
    > philip ashley

    Kudos Philip as this is just the kind of information I was hoping my post
    would produce. Also thanks to DanR for his feedback as well.

    But I am a bit overwhelmed with all the different routers available.

    I plan to use this notebook (roaming from room-to-room) on a WinXP Home
    Network with a desktop (the ICS host) in my bedroom.. I also will be using
    it with public hot spots when I travel.

    So I have would I hope are some simple questions about wireless routers for
    you gurus.

    Given my planned usage do you recommend a Wi-Fi router (e.g. the Orinoco
    BG-2000)? Or will a NON-Wi-Fi router like a Linksysy WRT54gs suffice?

    Also, if I use the Windows XP ICS software on my ICS host (a desktop in my
    bedroom) to share its DSL connection with my notebook, do I need the DSL
    software (from my ISP) installed on my notebook as well?

    Michael
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

    All common wireless routers allow both type of connections. You should always
    have the capability to connect via wire for certain setup functions and bios
    upgrades.

    Michael T wrote:
    > I want to access my desktop (with a router) using my notebook (laptop) in
    > another room.
    >
    > Putting firewall/security considerations aside, do you recommend a wireless
    > router or a hard wired router.
    >
    > Please advise. If you could explain why you recommend one over the other
    > that would be great.
    >
    > Thank you.
    >
    > Michael
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

    "Michael T" <anonymous@sbcglobal.net> wrote in message
    news:e9d84bSxFHA.3152@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
    > "Philip Ashley" <philip.ashleyRE@MOVEntlworld.com> wrote in message
    > news:JZM_e.2795$0w.356@newsfe5-gui.ntli.net...
    >>
    >> One downside of wireless is file transfer speed, its nearly always
    >> better using wired, especially for large files.
    >>
    >> philip ashley
    >
    > Kudos Philip as this is just the kind of information I was hoping my
    > post would produce. Also thanks to DanR for his feedback as well.
    >
    > But I am a bit overwhelmed with all the different routers available.
    >
    > I plan to use this notebook (roaming from room-to-room) on a WinXP
    > Home Network with a desktop (the ICS host) in my bedroom.. I also will
    > be using it with public hot spots when I travel.
    >
    > So I have would I hope are some simple questions about wireless
    > routers for you gurus.
    >
    > Given my planned usage do you recommend a Wi-Fi router (e.g. the
    > Orinoco BG-2000)? Or will a NON-Wi-Fi router like a Linksysy WRT54gs
    > suffice?
    >
    > Also, if I use the Windows XP ICS software on my ICS host (a desktop
    > in my bedroom) to share its DSL connection with my notebook, do I need
    > the DSL software (from my ISP) installed on my notebook as well?
    >
    > Michael
    >
    >

    No ICS! A router manages your network. Each computer is connected to
    the router, wireless or wired. The modem is connected to the router.
    Depending on your ISP you *might* have to clone the MAC address of the
    wired computer to the router, but most of the time a simple power cycle
    of the modem will let the router become the connected computer with the
    single IP address assigned to your account. You should check with your
    ISP for any guidelines for using a router, or check www.dslreports.com
    in the forum for your ISP on how to set it up.

    Q
  6. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

    Michael T wrote:

    > "Philip Ashley" <philip.ashleyRE@MOVEntlworld.com> wrote in message
    > news:JZM_e.2795$0w.356@newsfe5-gui.ntli.net...
    > >
    > > One downside of wireless is file transfer speed, its nearly always better
    > > using wired, especially for large files.
    > >
    > > philip ashley
    >
    > Kudos Philip as this is just the kind of information I was hoping my post
    > would produce. Also thanks to DanR for his feedback as well.
    >
    > But I am a bit overwhelmed with all the different routers available.
    >
    > I plan to use this notebook (roaming from room-to-room) on a WinXP Home
    > Network with a desktop (the ICS host) in my bedroom.. I also will be using
    > it with public hot spots when I travel.
    >
    > So I have would I hope are some simple questions about wireless routers for
    > you gurus.
    >
    > Given my planned usage do you recommend a Wi-Fi router (e.g. the Orinoco
    > BG-2000)? Or will a NON-Wi-Fi router like a Linksysy WRT54gs suffice?
    >
    > Also, if I use the Windows XP ICS software on my ICS host (a desktop in my
    > bedroom) to share its DSL connection with my notebook, do I need the DSL
    > software (from my ISP) installed on my notebook as well?
    >
    > Michael

    You're a little confused in your terminology. "wi-fi" generally is used to
    refer to any wireless networks in general
    (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wi-fi). Thus, the Orinoco BG 2000 and the
    Linksys WRT54gs are both "wi-fi" devices. The BG-2000 came at in 2002. I
    don't think you can buy one anymore, and Proxim calls it an "end-of-life"
    product (meaning, I think, that they know that it's out in the filed, but they
    don't intend to support it very much longer).

    Although the Orinoco unit was called a "gateway," these days, that term is
    often used to mean a device that combines a router, perhaps a wireless access
    point, and a cable or DSL modem. I don't think that the BG 2000 had the modem.

    The Linksys WRT54GS definitely does not have a modem. It is, however, a
    combination of a 4-port router (i.e., you can connect up to 4 ethernet cables
    to connect to PCs and/or other network devices) and a wireless access point.
    Like most other home routers these days, it has NAT capability and a firewall,
    and has a built-in PPPoE client. Although there are those who post to this ng
    who have little good to say about Linksys products, I had a WRT54g version 1.0
    and was perfectly happy with it until it got partially fried by a nearby
    lightning strike. I replaced it with a WRT54g version 4.0 (Linksys seems to
    have just come out with a 5.0).

    The "s" on the end of the WRT54gs indicates that it has Linksys' proprietary
    "speedbooster" technology, which Linksys claims will give you "up to 35%
    increase in speed over standard Wireless-G when used with other SpeedBooster
    products." The key here is that you MUST use other Linksys "SpeedBooster"
    products to even have a hope of getting this increase. If you have a new
    notebook with a built-in wireless access device, it almost certainly is NOT a
    Linksys "SpeedBooster" device, and you therefore ought not to spend the extra
    money for the "GS." Linksys also has an even (allegedly) faster version, the
    WRT54SRX. Here's the Linksy page comparing their 3 varieties
    http://tinyurl.com/9xqqh. If I were you, I would just get the basic WRT54G.

    Check out http://www.ezlan.net/ for further info. Don't just look at the
    "wireless" sections. There's a lot of other information there.
  7. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

    "Quaoar" <quaoar@tenthplanet.net> wrote in message
    news:uentz2SxFHA.900@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
    >
    > No ICS! A router manages your network. Each computer is connected to the
    > router, wireless or wired. The modem is connected to the router.
    <snip>
    >
    > Q

    Thanks Q.

    Although I have tons of experience as a software engineer I am a total
    newbie when it comes to configuring a home network using Windows XP.

    I will defer to your judgement as I have only been researching two days. But
    I do find it interesting that the WinXP Help file recommends that the first
    step is:
    "Run the Network Setup Wizard to setup your ICS host computer."

    So you can understand why I might be a bit puzzled when you stated "No
    ICS!".

    Please explain.

    Michael
  8. Yeah, if you want to use XP to distribute the internet connection, which from the sounds of it you don't. You could use ICS or other NAT/Proxy software solution on a XP host machine but it's not the preferred method. A router, and for you a wireless router, would handle that role.

    Wi-Fi is a certification by WECA. Basically it means the device has been tested to interoperate with other Wi-Fi compliant devices. Doesn't mean non Wi-Fi certified wireless gear won't work but they would be untested by WECA. Pretty much anything you see will be Wi-Fi but if you want the golden stamp of approval look for the red Wi-Fi lable on the box. The WRT54G series, including the GS are definitely Wi-Fi compiant.
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