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I Cant Get No Power Captain Scotty Out

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Anonymous
August 20, 2004 3:18:07 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Friday,
08.20.'04

"I can't get no power Captain!" Traditional response of
Scotty to Kirk, Starship Enterprise.

Among other essentials, I have two H.P. laptops- the
first, the older model, an H.P. Pavilion ze4125, the
second, an H.P. Pavilion ze5600.

Some time ago, the ze4125 flashed a notice that the
battery power was getting low and that I should recharge
the battery. I meant to do so just as I have in the past
when necessary, but this time I delayed and delayed and
delayed the maintenance duty.

Although I run the unit on electricity with the battery
plugged in, within the last week or so, when the unit is
about to shutdown, it seemed to turn off with an
exceedingly weak little "ting" as the screen went black
not the usual, robust "TING!" of times before. It seems
as if the unit is taking longer and longer to power up as
well. I thought, OK, no doubt about it- time to recharge
the battery. I went to, "Control Panel", "Performance
and Maintenance", "Power Options", "HP Battery
Optimizer", "Start" "Test Battery". On, "Test Battery",
on prior occasions, I could not get the "Next" command to
engage, it remained dimmed and inaccessible. As of
today, I can access the "Next" command but the unit
says "Error: Battery Communication. Process Terminated."

My question is, is there some keyboard command, something
akin to "ALT +5" or "Control Key + F10" which can
override routine established protocols and force the unit
to recharge the battery. At this point, the unit states
I have "0" battery power.

The unit still functions. Also, what would happen if I
took the battery out of the ze4125 and tried to recahrge
it in the ze5600? Would such action destroy both units,
switching batteries like that?

Hope you can help. Thanks for listening.

De Dean

More about : power captain scotty

Anonymous
August 20, 2004 7:01:32 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

> Among other essentials, I have two H.P. laptops...

Have you tried talking with HP, or checking their web site or some HP user
group? It doesn't sound like a Windows XP problem to me...

Bill -- (Remove KILLSPAM from my address to use it)
Anonymous
August 21, 2004 12:28:57 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Tom Pepper Willett wrote:
> Although “whilst” is a perfectly good traditional synonym of “while,”
> in American usage it is considered pretentious and old-fashioned ;-)
>
> Tom

1) I am *NOT* American (thank the gods!)
2) Whilst 'while' can be used 'whilst' (in this English major's opinion)
is the correct word - in *BRITISH* (and I daresay the other countries we
gave our language to and who know how to use it correctly - I'm talking
about Canada, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa and (although it has been
bastardised to an extent by you lot) the Caribbean) English. You lot can do
what you like (though many things irk me) but remember who had it first! I
believe that English is very poorly taught in American schools - making our
poor teaching/teachers look good!

Learn from the masters/mistresses... ;o)


--
My great-grandfather was born and raised in Elgin - did he eventually
lose his marbles?
Related resources
Anonymous
August 22, 2004 1:52:30 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Miss Perspicacia Tick wrote:
> Tom Pepper Willett wrote:
> > Although whilst is a perfectly good traditional synonym
> > of while, in American usage it is considered pretentious
> > and old-fashioned ;-)

Too --ing right! But next time lose the --ing smilely:
I hate --ing smilies. --ing smilies are so --ing twee!

> You [Americans] can do what you like (though many things
> irk me) but remember who had it first!

America is the --ing center of the --ing English world.
America gave us Elvis Presley (who, when he sings gospel,
makes all the --ing hairs on the back of your --ing head
tingle) and in return got those trite tossers the --ing
fab four. For Miles Davis, --ing Pink Floyd. America
produced Louis Armstrong who's yet to have a --ing equal.

As for literature, America has produced most --ing modern
masterpieces from authors like, just starting at the
beginning of the --ing alphabet: Henry Adams, Pearl Buck,
Steven Crane, etc. The U.K. (with the exception of Ireland)
is now a --ing cultural backwater. <sigh> What happened to our
--ing language? Once our words went into books that sizzled,
books like Jane Eyre, and now --ing books like --ing Harry
--ing Potter are mentioned in lists for literary prizes.

yours sincerely

reader from a former british colony
Anonymous
August 22, 2004 2:26:20 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

So what is a brancell?

--
Paul Cyr

-----

The Debate Continues... www.xvsxp.com

Protect Yourself and Others in 6 Simple Steps...
http://davechalkconnected.ipbhost.com/index.php?showtop...
-----

"Miss Perspicacia Tick" <misstick@lancre.dw> wrote in message
news:%QCVc.33039$Dz3.13465@fe48.usenetserver.com...
> Tom Pepper Willett wrote:
>> Although "whilst" is a perfectly good traditional synonym of "while,"
>> in American usage it is considered pretentious and old-fashioned ;-)
>>
>> Tom
>
> 1) I am *NOT* American (thank the gods!)
> 2) Whilst 'while' can be used 'whilst' (in this English major's
> opinion) is the correct word - in *BRITISH* (and I daresay the other
> countries we gave our language to and who know how to use it correctly -
> I'm talking about Canada, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa and
> (although it has been bastardised to an extent by you lot) the Caribbean)
> English. You lot can do what you like (though many things irk me) but
> remember who had it first! I believe that English is very poorly taught in
> American schools - making our poor teaching/teachers look good!
>
> Learn from the masters/mistresses... ;o)
>
>
> --
> My great-grandfather was born and raised in Elgin - did he eventually
> lose his marbles?
>
>
August 22, 2004 8:29:50 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Come on, you can't even spell "----ing" correctly.
America is also the country which 'upheld the Olympic spirit' by offering a
certain US swimmer $1,000,000 if he could beat Grant Hackett.
I was completely rapt when he couldn't even do that - 'money don't buy
everything'.
Talk about fair means or foul to achieve their objectives!

--

john(Colonial)f

> Miss Perspicacia Tick wrote:
>> Tom Pepper Willett wrote:
>>> Although whilst is a perfectly good traditional synonym
>>> of while, in American usage it is considered pretentious
>>> and old-fashioned ;-)
>
> Too --ing right! But next time lose the --ing smilely:
> I hate --ing smilies. --ing smilies are so --ing twee!
>
>> You [Americans] can do what you like (though many things
>> irk me) but remember who had it first!
>
> America is the --ing center of the --ing English world.
> America gave us Elvis Presley (who, when he sings gospel,
> makes all the --ing hairs on the back of your --ing head
> tingle) and in return got those trite tossers the --ing
> fab four. For Miles Davis, --ing Pink Floyd. America
> produced Louis Armstrong who's yet to have a --ing equal.
>
> As for literature, America has produced most --ing modern
> masterpieces from authors like, just starting at the
> beginning of the --ing alphabet: Henry Adams, Pearl Buck,
> Steven Crane, etc. The U.K. (with the exception of Ireland)
> is now a --ing cultural backwater. <sigh> What happened to our
> --ing language? Once our words went into books that sizzled,
> books like Jane Eyre, and now --ing books like --ing Harry
> --ing Potter are mentioned in lists for literary prizes.
>
> yours sincerely
>
> reader from a former british colony
Anonymous
August 23, 2004 12:05:53 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

johnf wrote:

> Come on, you can't even spell "----ing" correctly.

:-)

> America is also the country which 'upheld the Olympic spirit'
> by offering a certain US swimmer $1,000,000

I'm boycotting the Olympic Games; how dare they stop
Tatiana Grigorieva competing. --ing conspiracy!

> 'money don't buy everything'

' Sitting on a cornflake, waiting for the van to come.
' Corporation tee-shirt, stupid bloody tuesday.
' Man, you been a naughty boy, you let your face grow long.
' I am the eggman, they are the eggmen.
' I am the walrus, goo goo g'joob.

PS. Have you ever thought about the amount of pointless
punctuation in english. Take for instance, the word "don't."
What's the point of the apostrophe? It's not as if it can
have any other interpretation. (That is, apart from donut.)

So since we're cleaning up the internet by banning the word
"whilst," I vote we ought to toss out the apostrophe and
introduce "dont, wont, cant, ..., etc."
Anonymous
August 23, 2004 8:03:17 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Guy Worthington wrote:
> Miss Perspicacia Tick wrote:
>> Tom Pepper Willett wrote:
>>> Although whilst is a perfectly good traditional synonym
>>> of while, in American usage it is considered pretentious
>>> and old-fashioned ;-)
>
> Too --ing right! But next time lose the --ing smilely:
> I hate --ing smilies. --ing smilies are so --ing twee!
>
>> You [Americans] can do what you like (though many things
>> irk me) but remember who had it first!
>
> America is the --ing center of the --ing English world.
> America gave us Elvis Presley (who, when he sings gospel,
> makes all the --ing hairs on the back of your --ing head
> tingle) and in return got those trite tossers the --ing
> fab four. For Miles Davis, --ing Pink Floyd. America
> produced Louis Armstrong who's yet to have a --ing equal.
>
> As for literature, America has produced most --ing modern
> masterpieces from authors like, just starting at the
> beginning of the --ing alphabet: Henry Adams, Pearl Buck,
> Steven Crane, etc. The U.K. (with the exception of Ireland)
> is now a --ing cultural backwater. <sigh> What happened to our
> --ing language? Once our words went into books that sizzled,
> books like Jane Eyre, and now --ing books like --ing Harry
> --ing Potter are mentioned in lists for literary prizes.
>
> yours sincerely
>
> reader from a former british colony


I don't understand how you can compare jazz with pop/rock. Answer me this -
when was the last time an American author won the Booker Prize? It was last
won by a British author in '98 but at least one British author has been
shortlisted every year since. I'm not sure an American author has won it in
my lifetime! OK, I will concede we don't do jazz that well (though there is
a young jazz pianist whose name I've temporarily forgotten who, could
eventually rival Count Basie). You're harking back to another era though,
let's concentrate on the here and now. I think we can both agree that there
is very little in current popular music that's worth anything - from either
side of the pond. Literature, I'm definitely going to dispute! We have many
fine authors, some you may not have heard of. Take Minette Walters for
example, considered to be the new P.D. James - I don't read a lot of crime
fiction, but she's one of, if not the best.

We have many comic novelists, though the trouble here is you lot don't get
British humour. I could reel them off Douglas Adams, Terry Pratchett, Tom
Holt, Andrew Harman, Robert Rankin, Stephen Fry, Neil Gaiman (though his is
very dark humour).

Comedy not your bag? Well, what about thrillers? Jack Higgins, Dick Francis,
Ian Rankin, Bernard Cornwell (historical thrillers).

We also have some of the world's finest children's authors (JK aside):
Jaqueline Wilson, Roald Dahl, Dick King Smith, Philip Pullman, Brian Jacques
(the Redwall saga) Eoin Colfer (OK, so technically he's Irish, but I
couldn't list my favourite children's authours without mentioning him!).
Some of these (especially Philip Pullman) can be equally enjoyed by adults.
If you haven't read The Amber Spyglass by Philip Pullman, I suggest you
avail yourself of a copy. In fact, read the whole trilogy. When you've read
it, it won't surprise you to learn that Pullman was an English teacher for
25 years before taking up writing full time. And, of course, not forgetting
Tolkien (yes I know technically he's South African).

I have to say I don't much care for American authors (though I make an
exception for Bill Bryson), but my sister does read Patricia Cornwell.

So want to rethink your opinion on Britain being a cultural desert?


--
My great-grandfather was born and raised in Elgin - did he eventually
lose his marbles?
August 23, 2004 5:42:23 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

The European Commissioners have announced that an agreement has been reached
to adopt English as the preferred language for European communications,
rather than German, which was the other possibility.



As part of the negotiations, Her Majesty's Government conceded that English
spelling had some room for improvement and has accepted a five-year phased
plan for what will be known as EuroEnglish (Euro for short).



In the first year, "s" will be used instead of the soft "c".

Sertainley, sivil servants will resieve this news with joy.

Also, the hard "c" will be replaced with "k". Not only will this klear up
konfusion, but typewriters and komputers kan have one less letter.

There will be growing publik enthusiasm in the sekond year, when the
troublesome "ph" will be replaced by "f". This will make words like
"fotograf" 20 percent shorter.

In the third year, publik akseptanse of the new spelling kan be expekted to
reach the stage

where more komplikated changes are possible.

Governments will enkorage the removal of double letters, which have always
ben a deterent to akurate speling. Also, al wil agre that the horible mes
of silent "e"s in the languag is disgrasful, and they would go.

By the fourth year, peopl wil be replasing "th" by "z" and "w" by "v".
During ze fifz year,

ze unesesary "o" kan be dropd from vords kontaining "ou", and similar
changes vud of kors be aplid to ozer kombinations of leters.

After zis fifz yer, ve vil hav a reli sensibl riten styl. Zer vil be no mor
trubls or difikultis and evrivun vil find it ezi tu understand ech ozer.



Ze drem vil finali kum tru.

--

johnf

> johnf wrote:
>
>> Come on, you can't even spell "----ing" correctly.
>
> :-)
>
>> America is also the country which 'upheld the Olympic spirit'
>> by offering a certain US swimmer $1,000,000
>
> I'm boycotting the Olympic Games; how dare they stop
> Tatiana Grigorieva competing. --ing conspiracy!
>
> PS. Have you ever thought about the amount of pointless
> punctuation in english. Take for instance, the word "don't."
> What's the point of the apostrophe? It's not as if it can
> have any other interpretation. (That is, apart from donut.)
>
> So since we're cleaning up the internet by banning the word
> "whilst," I vote we ought to toss out the apostrophe and
> introduce "dont, wont, cant, ..., etc."
Anonymous
August 23, 2004 6:38:44 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

That's a stupid idea. How can us bourgeoisie exclude the proles if anyone can speak the bourgeoisie language (the elaborate as opposed to the restricted code of english). You Sir, are a class traitor. Sure you are not Lenin.

--
----------------------------------------------------------
'Not happy John! Defending our democracy',
http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2004/06/29/1088392635123...

"Guy Worthington" <nothung.13.guyw@spamgourmet.com> wrote in message news:714860e4.0408221905.4dc47e5c@posting.google.com...
> johnf wrote:
>
> > Come on, you can't even spell "----ing" correctly.
>
> :-)
>
> > America is also the country which 'upheld the Olympic spirit'
> > by offering a certain US swimmer $1,000,000
>
> I'm boycotting the Olympic Games; how dare they stop
> Tatiana Grigorieva competing. --ing conspiracy!
>
> > 'money don't buy everything'
>
> ' Sitting on a cornflake, waiting for the van to come.
> ' Corporation tee-shirt, stupid bloody tuesday.
> ' Man, you been a naughty boy, you let your face grow long.
> ' I am the eggman, they are the eggmen.
> ' I am the walrus, goo goo g'joob.
>
> PS. Have you ever thought about the amount of pointless
> punctuation in english. Take for instance, the word "don't."
> What's the point of the apostrophe? It's not as if it can
> have any other interpretation. (That is, apart from donut.)
>
> So since we're cleaning up the internet by banning the word
> "whilst," I vote we ought to toss out the apostrophe and
> introduce "dont, wont, cant, ..., etc."
August 23, 2004 6:48:37 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Well, let's start by banning 'gotten', David, IMO, the most bastardised word
in the American "language".
--

johnf

> That's a stupid idea. How can us bourgeoisie exclude the proles if
> anyone can speak the bourgeoisie language (the elaborate as opposed to
> the restricted code of english). You Sir, are a class traitor. Sure you
> are not Lenin.
>
> --
> ----------------------------------------------------------
> 'Not happy John! Defending our democracy',
> http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2004/06/29/1088392635123...
>
> "Guy Worthington" <nothung.13.guyw@spamgourmet.com> wrote in message
> news:714860e4.0408221905.4dc47e5c@posting.google.com...
>> johnf wrote:
>>
>>> Come on, you can't even spell "----ing" correctly.
>>
>> :-)
>>
>>> America is also the country which 'upheld the Olympic spirit'
>>> by offering a certain US swimmer $1,000,000
>>
>> I'm boycotting the Olympic Games; how dare they stop
>> Tatiana Grigorieva competing. --ing conspiracy!
>>
>>> 'money don't buy everything'
>>
>> ' Sitting on a cornflake, waiting for the van to come.
>> ' Corporation tee-shirt, stupid bloody tuesday.
>> ' Man, you been a naughty boy, you let your face grow long.
>> ' I am the eggman, they are the eggmen.
>> ' I am the walrus, goo goo g'joob.
>>
>> PS. Have you ever thought about the amount of pointless
>> punctuation in english. Take for instance, the word "don't."
>> What's the point of the apostrophe? It's not as if it can
>> have any other interpretation. (That is, apart from donut.)
>>
>> So since we're cleaning up the internet by banning the word
>> "whilst," I vote we ought to toss out the apostrophe and
>> introduce "dont, wont, cant, ..., etc."
Anonymous
August 23, 2004 7:21:46 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

I speak elaborate code. In 89 I moved to Wollongong, a very beautiful working class city. I can remember screaming at someone who had asked me to use shorter words (as I was daily) "it's got three syllables in it. That's not a long word".

--
----------------------------------------------------------
'Not happy John! Defending our democracy',
http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2004/06/29/1088392635123...

"johnf" <john_f@bigREMOVEpond.net.au> wrote in message news:enVnyxMiEHA.632@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> Well, let's start by banning 'gotten', David, IMO, the most bastardised word
> in the American "language".
> --
>
> johnf
>
> > That's a stupid idea. How can us bourgeoisie exclude the proles if
> > anyone can speak the bourgeoisie language (the elaborate as opposed to
> > the restricted code of english). You Sir, are a class traitor. Sure you
> > are not Lenin.
> >
> > --
> > ----------------------------------------------------------
> > 'Not happy John! Defending our democracy',
> > http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2004/06/29/1088392635123...
> >
> > "Guy Worthington" <nothung.13.guyw@spamgourmet.com> wrote in message
> > news:714860e4.0408221905.4dc47e5c@posting.google.com...
> >> johnf wrote:
> >>
> >>> Come on, you can't even spell "----ing" correctly.
> >>
> >> :-)
> >>
> >>> America is also the country which 'upheld the Olympic spirit'
> >>> by offering a certain US swimmer $1,000,000
> >>
> >> I'm boycotting the Olympic Games; how dare they stop
> >> Tatiana Grigorieva competing. --ing conspiracy!
> >>
> >>> 'money don't buy everything'
> >>
> >> ' Sitting on a cornflake, waiting for the van to come.
> >> ' Corporation tee-shirt, stupid bloody tuesday.
> >> ' Man, you been a naughty boy, you let your face grow long.
> >> ' I am the eggman, they are the eggmen.
> >> ' I am the walrus, goo goo g'joob.
> >>
> >> PS. Have you ever thought about the amount of pointless
> >> punctuation in english. Take for instance, the word "don't."
> >> What's the point of the apostrophe? It's not as if it can
> >> have any other interpretation. (That is, apart from donut.)
> >>
> >> So since we're cleaning up the internet by banning the word
> >> "whilst," I vote we ought to toss out the apostrophe and
> >> introduce "dont, wont, cant, ..., etc."
>
>
August 23, 2004 7:45:16 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Agreed. In the 60's, I spent a lot of time in the Wollongong to Albion Park
area (the home of the 30' TV antenna masts in those days). Love the Sth
coast, especially the Far Sth coast, now called Sapphire for some 'touristy'
reason - pity I'm now in Melb.

--

johnf

> I speak elaborate code. In 89 I moved to Wollongong, a very beautiful
> working class city. I can remember screaming at someone who had asked
> me to use shorter words (as I was daily) "it's got three syllables in
> it. That's not a long word".
>
> --
> ----------------------------------------------------------
> 'Not happy John! Defending our democracy',
> http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2004/06/29/1088392635123...
>
> "johnf" <john_f@bigREMOVEpond.net.au> wrote in message
> news:enVnyxMiEHA.632@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
>> Well, let's start by banning 'gotten', David, IMO, the most
>> bastardised word in the American "language".
>> --
>>
>> johnf
>>
>>> That's a stupid idea. How can us bourgeoisie exclude the proles if
>>> anyone can speak the bourgeoisie language (the elaborate as opposed to
>>> the restricted code of english). You Sir, are a class traitor. Sure
>>> you are not Lenin.
>>>
>>> --
>>> ----------------------------------------------------------
>>> 'Not happy John! Defending our democracy',
>>> http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2004/06/29/1088392635123...
>>>
>>> "Guy Worthington" <nothung.13.guyw@spamgourmet.com> wrote in message
>>> news:714860e4.0408221905.4dc47e5c@posting.google.com...
>>>> johnf wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> Come on, you can't even spell "----ing" correctly.
>>>>
>>>> :-)
>>>>
>>>>> America is also the country which 'upheld the Olympic spirit'
>>>>> by offering a certain US swimmer $1,000,000
>>>>
>>>> I'm boycotting the Olympic Games; how dare they stop
>>>> Tatiana Grigorieva competing. --ing conspiracy!
>>>>
>>>>> 'money don't buy everything'
>>>>
>>>> ' Sitting on a cornflake, waiting for the van to come.
>>>> ' Corporation tee-shirt, stupid bloody tuesday.
>>>> ' Man, you been a naughty boy, you let your face grow long.
>>>> ' I am the eggman, they are the eggmen.
>>>> ' I am the walrus, goo goo g'joob.
>>>>
>>>> PS. Have you ever thought about the amount of pointless
>>>> punctuation in english. Take for instance, the word "don't."
>>>> What's the point of the apostrophe? It's not as if it can
>>>> have any other interpretation. (That is, apart from donut.)
>>>>
>>>> So since we're cleaning up the internet by banning the word
>>>> "whilst," I vote we ought to toss out the apostrophe and
>>>> introduce "dont, wont, cant, ..., etc."
Anonymous
August 24, 2004 10:39:44 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

David Candy wrote:

> 2 things.

It'd have to one thing (unless of course I'm two puppies).

> You are a very, very sick puppy. And a gender traitor.
> Jane Austin indeed. Hope you rot in hell.

Humph! I misspelled Jane Austen (Jane Austen is an unsung
british authoress). I really wasnt talking about the well-
known dutch authoress who wrote "Prude and prejudiced."

> You are a very, very sick puppy. Book of mormon. I read
> the first book of the book. It was bloody boring.

I'll admit it's not the raciest of books. But it does
have lots of sentences containing the word 'whilst.'

And while we're about it what's this 'bloody' word; blody
two letters. You must've gotten the note on EuroEnglish.
Let's move with the times and speke like the Qwene.
Anonymous
August 26, 2004 1:03:01 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

David Candy wrote:

> One day I may even read a book again. But they need to
> make the print bigger.

I'm sorry your eyesight's failing, I hope you find
contentment (maybe you'll be like John Milton and
create your greatest masterpieces with impaired eyes.)
But you don't have a failing brain, so I won't excuse
you from your sloppy thinking.

> But my favourite written text would be the melian dialog
> (Thucydides in The Peloponnesian War about 300BC).
>
> http://www.mtholyoke.edu/acad/intrel/melian.htm
>
> It's about justice versus power. Irak (I'm in a french mood today)
> would be like the melians. Justice on their side but power overwhelms
> righteousness:

No, only a politician could draw that conclusion from the essay
you quoted. The only truth that is applicable to the current
tragedy that is unfolding with the birth of the Iraqi nation is
(as the Athenian envoy so pragmatically puts it):

' since you know as well as we do that right, as the world goes,
' is only in question between equals in power, while the strong
' do what they can and the weak suffer what they must.

but that's been true since forever. You've committed a sin -
you've burdened the author with your ideas of justice. You
just can't do that.

Can do better 2/10.
Anonymous
August 28, 2004 3:16:21 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Guy Worthington wrote:
> johnf wrote:
>
>> Come on, you can't even spell "----ing" correctly.
>
> :-)
>
>> America is also the country which 'upheld the Olympic spirit'
>> by offering a certain US swimmer $1,000,000
>
> I'm boycotting the Olympic Games; how dare they stop
> Tatiana Grigorieva competing. --ing conspiracy!
>
>> 'money don't buy everything'
>
> ' Sitting on a cornflake, waiting for the van to come.
> ' Corporation tee-shirt, stupid bloody tuesday.
> ' Man, you been a naughty boy, you let your face grow long.
> ' I am the eggman, they are the eggmen.
> ' I am the walrus, goo goo g'joob.
>
> PS. Have you ever thought about the amount of pointless
> punctuation in english. Take for instance, the word "don't."
> What's the point of the apostrophe? It's not as if it can
> have any other interpretation. (That is, apart from donut.)
>
> So since we're cleaning up the internet by banning the word
> "whilst," I vote we ought to toss out the apostrophe and
> introduce "dont, wont, cant, ..., etc."


Erm, because the apostrophe replaces the missing letter. And 'wont' without
an apostrophe has an entirely different meaning

"wont chiefly formal, literary or old use adj habitually inclined;
accustomed • He is wont to retire to bed early. noun a habit that one has •
It was her wont to rise early. verb, tr & intr (wont or wonts, wont or
wonted, wonting) to become, or make someone become, accustomed. wonted adj
customary.
ETYMOLOGY: Anglo-Saxon gewunod accustomed."

Taken from the Chambers English Dictionary. It might be old-fashioned, but
it's still recognised English.


--
My great-grandfather was born and raised in Elgin - did he eventually
lose his marbles?
Anonymous
August 28, 2004 3:16:22 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Miss Perspicacia Tick wrote:
> Guy Worthington wrote:
> >
> > since we're cleaning up the internet by banning the word
> > "whilst," I vote we ought to toss out the apostrophe and
> > introduce "dont, wont, cant, ..., etc."
>
> [can't] the apostrophe replaces the missing letter. And 'wont'
> without an apostrophe has an entirely different meaning
>

Dearest Mistress Tick, whilst thou, gentlest of ladies,
useth many words to pen thy graceful and elegant letters,
thy servant is wont to write with a small number of words;
and wouldst more think 'Wont' as the name of an oompah-
loompah from Willy Wonka's Chocolate factory, than a real
honest-to-goodness word still in common circulation.

However, as I am not an unreasonable man, and because only
gentle folk (as is their wont) will want to use 'wont,'
I will just declare 'wont' (previously spelled won't) and
'wont' (previously spelled wont) as homonyms - thereby
ending any confusion in their use.

This is the start. Perspicacia come joineth me. For united
we can vanquish English: Think! American, no, smart-TXT, as
the lingua-franca of the Commonwealth.

Yours sincerely

your unworthy correspondent
!