Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Closed

Windows 95 OEM Registration Number

Last response: in Windows 95/98/ME
Share
April 8, 2004 8:09:50 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win95.general.discussion (More info?)

I have an old Compaq P2200 computer for my son running
windows 95. I used a restore disc to clear out the system
and when the computer booted back up it asks for a
registration number like xxx-oem-xxxx-xxxx-xxxx. Compaq
and Microsoft no longer support this program. Where can I
get an OEM # so I can get my kids computer working again?

Thanks
April 8, 2004 10:34:26 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win95.general.discussion (More info?)

Should be on the "Certificate of Authenticity" that came with Win95. Mine
was attached to the small Win95 "manual" that came with the machine. Also
displayed on the "System Properties" window but that won't help much now.

"Dan" <slc84106@aol.com> wrote in message
news:15b9a01c41dbe$9834b7c0$a001280a@phx.gbl...
> I have an old Compaq P2200 computer for my son running
> windows 95. I used a restore disc to clear out the system
> and when the computer booted back up it asks for a
> registration number like xxx-oem-xxxx-xxxx-xxxx. Compaq
> and Microsoft no longer support this program. Where can I
> get an OEM # so I can get my kids computer working again?
>
> Thanks
April 16, 2004 5:26:05 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win95.general.discussion (More info?)

Mouseyface,

You raise an interesting point. I also am looking for a "certificate of authenticity" number so that I can re-install Windows 95 on a friend's computer. When I attempted to re-install without the number, I was prompted onscreen to call 1-800-RU-LEGIT. After waiting for about 5 minutes and navigating the voicemail, I was referred to another number, which asked for a 4-digit code, which I do not have. So I took Bill Starbuck's advice and called 1-800-Microsoft. They in turn passed me off to yet another number, a (425) area code number. Well, after waiting another 10 minutes on hold I had to go to work. I won't even tell you number of emails we sent without receiving anything more than the automated "We received your email" response.

My point is this: My friend bought her computer and paid for Windows 95. Like many people, she lost something. Should it be this difficult to find out her certificate number? Personally, I don't think so. So I'll take sc57's numbers and say thanks very much to sc57 for helping my friend get her computer running again. While I understand licensing issues, it's things like this that make people critical of Microsoft and question their business practices.
Related resources
Anonymous
May 7, 2004 10:46:47 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win95.general.discussion (More info?)

MS no longer supports Windows 95. And if it came with her computer it was
probably OEM and MS never supported OEM OS's. Only the computer
manufacturer supported these and she should call them.

You, too, make it hard for the rest of us with this attitude. Because
people don't put their registrations numbers in a safe place or record them
in a special notebook, they think you can "get a free number" online. Many
of these numbers are stolen or fake and many of these people requesting them
have copied or pirated software.

I am not taking up for MS but for all of us out there who, now, have to
activate software. The activation wasn't to protect MS from pirates but
from ordinary folks who "give" copies to friends and neighbors.

As for your friend, she can get a copy of Win95 on ebay with a legitimate
number for around $15.00. I am sorry she lost her number but tell her write
them in a little book, like some of us do out here. Also, it is printed on
the little book that came with W95, the certificate of authenticity label on
the front. It would be better if she purchased W98SE.

This is just the way that I feel. I lose things, too, but not something
like this. I am fussing because of the annoyance that this practice has
caused.

"lostinspace" <anonymous@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:6202ED7D-0D99-403B-957F-A3CB6B2603CE@microsoft.com...
> Mouseyface,
>
> You raise an interesting point. I also am looking for a "certificate of
authenticity" number so that I can re-install Windows 95 on a friend's
computer. When I attempted to re-install without the number, I was prompted
onscreen to call 1-800-RU-LEGIT. After waiting for about 5 minutes and
navigating the voicemail, I was referred to another number, which asked for
a 4-digit code, which I do not have. So I took Bill Starbuck's advice and
called 1-800-Microsoft. They in turn passed me off to yet another number, a
(425) area code number. Well, after waiting another 10 minutes on hold I had
to go to work. I won't even tell you number of emails we sent without
receiving anything more than the automated "We received your email"
response.
>
> My point is this: My friend bought her computer and paid for Windows 95.
Like many people, she lost something. Should it be this difficult to find
out her certificate number? Personally, I don't think so. So I'll take
sc57's numbers and say thanks very much to sc57 for helping my friend get
her computer running again. While I understand licensing issues, it's things
like this that make people critical of Microsoft and question their business
practices.
January 27, 2010 1:34:50 AM

Thanks for the product keys. I am reformatting a computer and I had to start all the way back to Windows 95. I never would have found these authentic keys. They work! Thanks again.
Anonymous
January 27, 2010 9:58:53 AM

Necro post.
!