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Mac OS X vs. Windows

Last response: in Windows 7
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March 22, 2011 2:54:30 AM

I am a Mac owner of two Macs. I use my 1.8GHz Powermac G5 for web development, video editing and graphic design. I use my iBook G4 for surfing internet in coffee shops and for showing my work to clients once it's uploaded to a web server. My iBook G4 is not really usable for any serious work as I use Adobe CS4 Design Premium Suite for all my work and CS4 version demands at least a G5 processor or better.

I want to upgrade to Adobe CS5 Design Premium, but I can't because CS5 version doesn't support PPC platform any longer. What should I do? My Powermac G5 is not worth much anymore and the brand new or even refurbished Mac Pro desktop tower is too expensive for me. I am exploring the possibility of switching to PC and having a local PC shop build a decent custom Windows 7 Professional 64-bit based machine for me, for around $800.

Is switching to PC a viable option or should I get a used Mac Pro? I want stability and reliability above all and I don't want crashes or viruses. Is this possible with a PC? I really need some objective analysis and opinions. Thank you very much for your feedback. I really appreciate it.

More about : mac windows

a b $ Windows 7
March 22, 2011 3:19:08 AM

PC and make it dual boot windows and snow leopard.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nG7LcpjZySc

I build these all the time. Tomorrow I am going to get it running on my new 2600k.

$800 can get you a rig PC that will run osx in circles aroung your old macs.

The on in this video I let got for $300 just because I didnt need it any more, and I wanted the money to get an SSD. I onnly had about $300 in it.
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March 22, 2011 3:30:26 AM

What i found with dual boot is that I ended staying in one side of the OS all the time and never booting to the other one. If you need both sides (mac and pc) then yes dual boot but if you don't I would not do that.

If you don't plan on gaming or using pc software, or connecting to government websites (internet explorer) buy a pc.

http://www.brighthub.com/computing/mac-platform/article...

Its really a matter of preference. I had a mac in college then moved to PC simply because i like to customize my PC.
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a b $ Windows 7
March 22, 2011 3:33:40 AM

Certainly a PC can be less expensive than a Mac. Whatever programs you use that exists on both platform probably will require a small learning curve get used to a slightly different interface. If you think your Mac will hinder you with your work, then it is probably a good idea to switch over to a PC. Or simply save up money for a new Mac and deal with current Mac's shortcomings for the moment.

How does Windows 7 compare to OS X? I don't know. Win 7 is pretty stable. Win XP is even more stable, but it has been out since 2001 so a lot of stability issues have been resolved.

As for viruses... If I wanted to develop a virus, I would rather develop one for Windows as opposed to OS X simply because of the significantly larger install base. That way I can infect as many computers as possible. I recommend using Avast Anti Virus Free (or the paid version) and Malwarebytes to scan for viruses, trojans, and other malware.

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March 22, 2011 4:34:54 PM

daship said:
PC and make it dual boot windows and snow leopard.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nG7LcpjZySc

I build these all the time. Tomorrow I am going to get it running on my new 2600k.

$800 can get you a rig PC that will run osx in circles aroung your old macs.

The on in this video I let got for $300 just because I didnt need it any more, and I wanted the money to get an SSD. I onnly had about $300 in it.



I don't like hacked software because of previous bad experiences with other hacked applications that I tried on some work PCs. I want to stick with legal and legit version of Windows 7 Pro 64-bit, if I decide to switch to PC and maybe build a PC with Intel Xeon Processor. What are your thoughts. Thanks for your time.
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a b $ Windows 7
March 22, 2011 4:51:10 PM

CS5 is supported on Windows and, as long as everything else that you use is also available for Windows I would make the switch. You have already discovered that you can save a considerable amount of memory by switching. Whether the performance of the system you have specced will be quite that of a top of the range Mac Pro I don't know (but look at the price difference!) but rest assured it will easily outperform your current setup.

The one thing that you might want to check is if it is possible to upgrade Design Premium from the Mac version to the Windows one; the answer to that will also affect costs.

Don't bother with dual-boot or Hackintoshes. Sure it can be done, but when the OS is upgraded things will break. This is a machine that you use for your living; don't mess about with cobbled-together systems.
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March 23, 2011 9:00:42 AM

Ijack said:
CS5 is supported on Windows and, as long as everything else that you use is also available for Windows I would make the switch. You have already discovered that you can save a considerable amount of memory by switching. Whether the performance of the system you have specced will be quite that of a top of the range Mac Pro I don't know (but look at the price difference!) but rest assured it will easily outperform your current setup.

The one thing that you might want to check is if it is possible to upgrade Design Premium from the Mac version to the Windows one; the answer to that will also affect costs.

Don't bother with dual-boot or Hackintoshes. Sure it can be done, but when the OS is upgraded things will break. This is a machine that you use for your living; don't mess about with cobbled-together systems.



Hi there iJack,
I really agree with you. I see no reason in staying with Apple any longer. I basically got screwed by Apple just because I have a little older Mac. PC boys can run the most current version of the Adobe CS Design Premium Suite (CS5) on any Pentium 4 and that means even on those lowly 1.3GHz machines, while I can't run the Adobe CS5 Suite on my heavily upgraded Powermac G5, which is a 3 times faster machine than the slowest Pentium 4. It's obvious that things are unfair in the Apple world.

In regards to your concern about being able to transfer the Adobe CS license to PC, I can tell you that I can just call Adobe and they will transfer my license to PC free of charge. That's one good thing about switching platforms. If a software company makes both versions of a particular program, they will just transfer your license to your new OS platform and problem solved. I would, however, have to deactivate and uninstall the Mac version and then install the PC version on a new PC.

The other thing I want to mention is that all those game studios use high-end PC workstations for video game and very complex animation rendering and complete game and cartoon production. They use the Maya program, which is not even made for Mac, so they must be pretty happy if they are sticking with the PC platform and PC-only software. But sure, those game and animation studios use very high-end hardware with the top of the line Xeon processors, loads and loads of RAM and those workstation grade graphics cards (Nvidia Quadro line), which make their lives much easier.

Thank you very much for your kind responses everybody and please, anybody, tell me more about Windows 7. Why is it so much better than previous versions of Windows (XP, Vista)? Can it be compared in quality and stability with Mac OS X? I am just curious to hear some of your opinions and maybe opinions of your friends who used both platforms for serious work. Thank you so much for your participation. I really want to be happy when I switch to the PC platform (Windows).


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a b $ Windows 7
March 23, 2011 10:31:23 AM

Just one slight correction - Maya is available for OS X and always has been (but don't let that change your mind!). I guess the reason that game studios and the like use PCs is because that is one of their prime markets and also they want the best bang for their bucks when it comes to equipment.

Why is Windows 7 better than previous versions? Difficult question. It's really just evolution; it's newer and so supports modern hardware better as well as using newer thoughts about Operating System design. Personally, I haven't found any version of Windows since 2000 unstable, and I've had to look after quite a few, laptops, desktops and servers.

As far as quality and stability go I think it is a myth that OS X is better than Windows; they are both pretty equal in those respects. (And, contrary to popular belief, OS X regularly tests as less secure than Windows - it's just that because it's a niche thing the malware authors don't target it.) As for ease of use - well that's just what you're used to; anyone can soon adapt to change.

A big difference, as far as I am concerned, is one of philosophy. Apple control their hardware and software extremely tightly. For example, you can only (talking mainstream here) run their software on their hardware. And it is becoming clear that they are increasingly controlling the distribution of third-party software also. Microsoft, on the other hand, don't care what machinery you run their products on - as long as the processor is an x86 one - are happy for you to purchase your third-party software from whoever you wish, and don't place any restrictions on that software. It's ironic when you remember the classic "1984" Apple advertisement that it is they who are now the control freaks.

That's just my two cents worth.
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a b $ Windows 7
March 23, 2011 12:10:47 PM

coilaman said:
I don't like hacked software because of previous bad experiences with other hacked applications that I tried on some work PCs. I want to stick with legal and legit version of Windows 7 Pro 64-bit, if I decide to switch to PC and maybe build a PC with Intel Xeon Processor. What are your thoughts. Thanks for your time.



There aint nothing hacked about it. It is genuine Windows, and Genuine Snow leopard.

There isn't nothing special a xeon is going to do for you.

Here is a PC I just built that was around $1500. Some time this week I will be installing OSX on it as well.

http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/forum/forum2.php?config=t...

This baby screams with CS5, photoshop 64bit opens in 2 seconds.
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a c 352 $ Windows 7
March 23, 2011 2:31:37 PM

daship said:
There aint nothing hacked about it. It is genuine Windows, and Genuine Snow leopard.

There isn't nothing special a xeon is going to do for you.

Here is a PC I just built that was around $1500. Some time this week I will be installing OSX on it as well.

http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/forum/forum2.php?config=t...

This baby screams with CS5, photoshop 64bit opens in 2 seconds.



Installing a MAC OS on a non-MAC PC is breaking the license agreement, thus "hacked".

2. Permitted License Uses and Restrictions.
A. This License allows you to install and use one copy of the Apple Software on a single Apple-labeled computer at a time...

Just because it's possible to do something, does not mean it's allowed.
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a b $ Windows 7
March 23, 2011 3:21:32 PM

Hey, it's easy to make an Apple-labeled computer. They are even kind enough to provide two decals with the OS. I can't think what else they are intended for as computers produced by Apple already have an Apple label on them. But I think we all know that, in many jurisdictions - e.g. the E.U. - EULAs have no legal standing.

(Note: The wording of the EULA changed with Snow Leopard to "Apple-branded computer". I think that Apple's lawyers realized that they hadn't got it quite right.)
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a b $ Windows 7
March 23, 2011 10:24:38 PM

hang-the-9 said:
Installing a MAC OS on a non-MAC PC is breaking the license agreement, thus "hacked".

2. Permitted License Uses and Restrictions.
A. This License allows you to install and use one copy of the Apple Software on a single Apple-labeled computer at a time...

Just because it's possible to do something, does not mean it's allowed.



Hack doesn't have anything to do with not abiding by the license. Like the other guy said they give you the same sticker they use included with the OS. Technically now that they use Intel CPUs, nothing in a mac is Apple branded. The only part Apple makes is the case. Everything that makes it run is from 3rd party vendors, Intel, Nvidia, Ati, ect..... So if you want to get picky Apple is breaking its own license.

Hack means changing something, or modifiying it in some way.

As long as I use the sticker they give me, I am apple labeled :p 
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a c 352 $ Windows 7
March 24, 2011 3:58:27 PM

We all know that sticker is not for "branding" a PC, why don't you put that sticker on a DELL and bring it over to the Apple store for warranty repairs?

That's actually a good test if something is OK to do, will Apple support it?
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a b $ Windows 7
March 24, 2011 4:44:55 PM

Apple won't support OS X installed on a non-Apple computer (obviously). That's a matter of the contract that you have with them and this is where the EULA does have an effect. But, if you don't alter the code in any way, there's no law that prevents you installing on non-Apple equipment.
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