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Canan s750 head cleaning, burnt head?

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November 19, 2004 12:27:42 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Hello,

My Canon s750 has been giving me trouble. It stopped printing black,
but my black tank is about 1/2 full. I figured it was a clogged head,
and I've tried multiple deep cleaning cycles, soaking in alcohol, and I
just tried a cleaning kit from inkjetsaver.com.

None of those things helped, and while I was running the last cleaning I
began to smell burning from the printer. I pulled out the head and it
was very hot, bit there was no smoke.

Does anyone have any suggestions on reviving it? Did I just burn out
the head on the last cleaning?

Thanks.
Anonymous
November 19, 2004 12:27:43 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

"Brian" <spam.is@ikilling.invalid> wrote in message
news:it8nd.2829$1u.1910@twister.nyroc.rr.com...
> Hello,
>
> My Canon s750 has been giving me trouble. It stopped printing black, but
> my black tank is about 1/2 full. I figured it was a clogged head, and
> I've tried multiple deep cleaning cycles, soaking in alcohol, and I just
> tried a cleaning kit from inkjetsaver.com.
>
> None of those things helped, and while I was running the last cleaning I
> began to smell burning from the printer. I pulled out the head and it was
> very hot, bit there was no smoke.
>
> Does anyone have any suggestions on reviving it? Did I just burn out the
> head on the last cleaning?
>

Ink passing through the nozzles also helps maintain an acceptable head temp
while in operation. IF you were to do many cleanings in a row with a clogged
head, I suppose it could get hot and smell, but I wonder if something was
not damaged in the alcohol bath.
In either case, I dare say it is history.

Considering the cost of diagnostics and a new head if that is the problem,
my recommendation (if in the U.S. anyway) is call Canon and take advantage
of the Loyalty Program. I picked up my iP4000 for just over $130 shipped
next day to my door. A new printer, better resolution and a new warranty.
That is if you want to stick with Canon any way.
November 19, 2004 8:11:55 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

PC Medic wrote:
> "Brian" <spam.is@ikilling.invalid> wrote in message
> news:it8nd.2829$1u.1910@twister.nyroc.rr.com...
>>Hello,
>>
>>My Canon s750 has been giving me trouble. It stopped printing black, but
>>my black tank is about 1/2 full. I figured it was a clogged head, and
>>I've tried multiple deep cleaning cycles, soaking in alcohol, and I just
>>tried a cleaning kit from inkjetsaver.com.
>>
>>None of those things helped, and while I was running the last cleaning I
>>began to smell burning from the printer. I pulled out the head and it was
>>very hot, bit there was no smoke.
>>
>>Does anyone have any suggestions on reviving it? Did I just burn out the
>>head on the last cleaning?
>>
>
> Ink passing through the nozzles also helps maintain an acceptable head temp
> while in operation. IF you were to do many cleanings in a row with a clogged
> head, I suppose it could get hot and smell, but I wonder if something was
> not damaged in the alcohol bath.
> In either case, I dare say it is history.
>
> Considering the cost of diagnostics and a new head if that is the problem,
> my recommendation (if in the U.S. anyway) is call Canon and take advantage
> of the Loyalty Program. I picked up my iP4000 for just over $130 shipped
> next day to my door. A new printer, better resolution and a new warranty.
> That is if you want to stick with Canon any way.
>

CanAn, man, how did I miss that spelling error...

I originally went with the Canon because of the separate head and ink
tanks, but now I've found out that actually getting a new head isn't
really worth it.

I'm now thinking that the HP model of replacing the heads with the
cartridge is the way to go. I guess you can always buy a refill kit and
get a little more life out of those carts?

Any advice on a multifunction device? Faxing from home would be nice.
Related resources
November 19, 2004 9:14:51 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Brian wrote:

>I originally went with the Canon because of the separate head and ink
>tanks, but now I've found out that actually getting a new head isn't
>really worth it.
>
>I'm now thinking that the HP model of replacing the heads with the
>cartridge is the way to go.

That's why I switched back to HP recently. I've been an HP user for
years, but decided to give the Canon i850 a try last year when I wanted
to upgrade to a printer with better photo output. A scant 4000 pages
over 16 months, and the printhead failed. At just over $80 for a new
head, it wasn't worth it to me.

So I went looking for info on a new printer again, and after much
reading and hands-on testing, I decided the best way to go was with the
HP Deskjet 6540. It lacks photo card slots, but then I didn't want them
as I usually edit my photos prior to printing anyway. The 6540 has
similar ink usage and costs as the Canon, has slightly better photo
output, and no more printhead issues.

> I guess you can always buy a refill kit and
>get a little more life out of those carts?

Yes, I believe so. I understand the carts are good for 8-10 refills
before the heads burn out. But just pop in a new cartridge and you're
working with a brand new head again.

>Any advice on a multifunction device? Faxing from home would be nice.

I generally don't care for all in one devices, so I can't comment.
Anonymous
November 20, 2004 12:25:44 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

"Brian" <spam.is@ikilling.invalid> wrote in message
news:vgfnd.3898$1u.3269@twister.nyroc.rr.com...

> I'm now thinking that the HP model of replacing the heads with the
> cartridge is the way to go.

Actually for a company it's the wrong way to go. Having separate tanks and
head is the only way to differentiate products without creating logistical
nightmare of having to sell hundreds of cartridges. There are two parameters
you want to differentiate, and both of them have to be done by having
different head:
- speed (head with more nozzles)
- quality (head with smaller droplets, or with more colors)

HP home printers are very limited in parameter range, and this is because of
using the same set of cartridges. They don't differ in printing speed too
much (are slower than canons especially in color), and are obsolete - they
still use 4 pl droplets. I guess when you sell so many pritheads they have
to be cheap :-(

Even HP knows it's better to have separate head and tanks and separate tanks
for each color. But it keeps this superior design for more expansive
printers.

http://h10010.www1.hp.com/wwpc/us/en/sm/WF25a/18972-236...
http://h10010.www1.hp.com/wwpc/us/en/sm/WF25a/18972-236...

http://h10010.www1.hp.com/wwpc/pscmisc/vac/us/product_p...

"Choose HP's most cost-effective color printer for
general office use. Save money initially and over time,
with a low purchase price and four individual
high-capacity replacement ink cartridges that reduce
intervention and deliver consistent, outstanding print
quality and lowest cost-per-page. Each of the four ink
cartridges holds a single color, so when a cartridge
runs out, replace only that color, eliminating waste.
Four separate, long-lasting printheads are another
important element of the economical design-you don't
throw away a functional printhead when replacing an
empty cartridge."

> I guess you can always buy a refill kit and
> get a little more life out of those carts?

But it's not as easy as in case of Canon, where you just pop 3-rd party
cartridge instead of original, for 1/5 the price. In Hp you either toy with
syringes, smear your hands with ink, deal with ink flowing out of the
cartrigde, and have a problem with resetting printer settings - as hp
printers have protections against refillers built in. Or you buy refilled
cartridge, which is unfortunately expansive - costs 1/2 of original
cartridge price.

I wouldn't count on on HP reliability too much. I used them in the past and
had a lot of problems with paper tray - in all models. Like taking multiple
sheets at once. Over time paper trays started working worse, at the end it
only accepted 1 sheet of paper at once. I guess it's kind of an planned
obsolescence on HP's part, as even Lexmark printers have very good and
reliable paper handling mechanism.
November 20, 2004 8:12:47 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

mpx wrote:

>HP home printers are very limited in parameter range, and this is because of
>using the same set of cartridges. They don't differ in printing speed too
>much (are slower than canons especially in color),

Actually, different models do produce different results.

For instance, the HP 5740 and 6540 both use the same cartridges, however
the 6540 is noticeably faster.

> and are obsolete - they still use 4 pl droplets.

My printer cartridges actually use 5pl droplets for colour, and 15pl
droplets for black.

But even with the bigger droplets, the colour rendition and tones are
surprisingly good using just four colours - it's a match to my old Canon
i850 printer. Using six colours is even better.

With relatively large black droplets, you'd think small text would be
poor, but I've compared the same text side by side, and it's sharper
than the Canon which uses droplets 1/3 the size.

>Even HP knows it's better to have separate head and tanks and separate tanks
>for each color. But it keeps this superior design for more expansive
>printers.

That's just marketing hype to keep up with the competition, like always.

The business inkjets have lower quality colour printing, and photos
while still pretty good, are not the equal of a decent photo printer
from any of the other brands. Even HP's own printers produce better
output.

But then they're not designed for photos. They're designed for office
use with higher page yields per cartridge along with higher prices. If
you compare costs, the per page is no better. The only advantage is less
frequent cartridge changes because the ink volumes are larger.

>> I guess you can always buy a refill kit and
>> get a little more life out of those carts?
>
>But it's not as easy as in case of Canon, where you just pop 3-rd party
>cartridge instead of original, for 1/5 the price.

And 1/5 the quality. I've yet to find a third-party ink tank supplier
that uses equally good quality ink for 1/5 the price.

I've been able to find good bulk ink and refill. But I can't get good
cartridges for that price. About half price maybe, but not 1/5.

> In Hp you either toy with
>syringes, smear your hands with ink, deal with ink flowing out of the
>cartrigde,

If you have those problems, you shouldn't be refilling any brand of ink
cartridge...nor doing anything else that requires some coordination. :) 

>I wouldn't count on on HP reliability too much. I used them in the past and
>had a lot of problems with paper tray - in all models. Like taking multiple
>sheets at once. Over time paper trays started working worse, at the end it
>only accepted 1 sheet of paper at once. I guess it's kind of an planned
>obsolescence on HP's part, as even Lexmark printers have very good and
>reliable paper handling mechanism.

I guess it's all relative.

I've used plenty of HP inkjet and laser printers, and none have given
any paper handling issues due to wear or design. In fact, my parents
still use an ancient HP Deskjet 520 printer I gave them a long time ago.
It sat idle in a closet for a year, and when I hooked it up, it printed
perfectly. Heck, I expected to have to get a new cartridge at the very
least, but nope it worked fine.

I can't say that about the Canon i850 I had. Nor my friend's i550.
Anonymous
November 20, 2004 8:28:49 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

"Brian" <spam.is@ikilling.invalid> wrote in message
news:vgfnd.3898$1u.3269@twister.nyroc.rr.com...
> PC Medic wrote:
>> "Brian" <spam.is@ikilling.invalid> wrote in message
>> news:it8nd.2829$1u.1910@twister.nyroc.rr.com...
>>>Hello,
>>>
>>>My Canon s750 has been giving me trouble. It stopped printing black, but
>>>my black tank is about 1/2 full. I figured it was a clogged head, and
>>>I've tried multiple deep cleaning cycles, soaking in alcohol, and I just
>>>tried a cleaning kit from inkjetsaver.com.
>>>
>>>None of those things helped, and while I was running the last cleaning I
>>>began to smell burning from the printer. I pulled out the head and it
>>>was very hot, bit there was no smoke.
>>>
>>>Does anyone have any suggestions on reviving it? Did I just burn out the
>>>head on the last cleaning?
>>>
>>
>> Ink passing through the nozzles also helps maintain an acceptable head
>> temp while in operation. IF you were to do many cleanings in a row with a
>> clogged head, I suppose it could get hot and smell, but I wonder if
>> something was not damaged in the alcohol bath.
>> In either case, I dare say it is history.
>>
>> Considering the cost of diagnostics and a new head if that is the
>> problem, my recommendation (if in the U.S. anyway) is call Canon and take
>> advantage of the Loyalty Program. I picked up my iP4000 for just over
>> $130 shipped next day to my door. A new printer, better resolution and a
>> new warranty. That is if you want to stick with Canon any way.
>>
>
> CanAn, man, how did I miss that spelling error...
>
> I originally went with the Canon because of the separate head and ink
> tanks, but now I've found out that actually getting a new head isn't
> really worth it.
>
> I'm now thinking that the HP model of replacing the heads with the
> cartridge is the way to go. I guess you can always buy a refill kit and
> get a little more life out of those carts?
>

Well, generally you would not need to replace the head. I have several
Canon's (one almost 6 years old) and have never had a printhead fail. Yes it
can happen just like with any other brand, but with my Canon I know if it
does (on the 3 newer units I have) that the printhead is also covered under
the warranty. Even with the cost of the Extended warranty from Canon which
covered the head for the additional 2 years and using Canon OEM inks, I
still save plenty having individual tanks compared to my previous printers
with the all-in-one tanks.
November 20, 2004 11:25:13 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Thanks for your great insight into this.

OK, so this leaves me in this position:
I have a canon s750 with a burnt out print head. I haven't been able to
find a new print head for sale anywhere, but I hear they are expensive.
All of the logic behind the separate print head makes sense, and it's
the reason I went with Canon in the first place. However, given the
extreme cost for fixing it, I'm not sure it's worth it.

So this brings up the question: Did my print head fail abnormally? I
had been using cheap replacement ink carts, and only print a few pages a
month. If I had bought better quality ink, would the head not have failed?

I'm stuck here now trying to figure out if I should buy a new printer
(I'm intrigued by the multifunction devices), or keep spending money
trying to fix the one I have.


mpx wrote:
> "Brian" <spam.is@ikilling.invalid> wrote in message
> news:vgfnd.3898$1u.3269@twister.nyroc.rr.com...
>
>>I'm now thinking that the HP model of replacing the heads with the
>>cartridge is the way to go.
>
> Actually for a company it's the wrong way to go. Having separate tanks and
> head is the only way to differentiate products without creating logistical
> nightmare of having to sell hundreds of cartridges. There are two parameters
> you want to differentiate, and both of them have to be done by having
> different head:
> - speed (head with more nozzles)
> - quality (head with smaller droplets, or with more colors)
>
> HP home printers are very limited in parameter range, and this is because of
> using the same set of cartridges. They don't differ in printing speed too
> much (are slower than canons especially in color), and are obsolete - they
> still use 4 pl droplets. I guess when you sell so many pritheads they have
> to be cheap :-(
>
> Even HP knows it's better to have separate head and tanks and separate tanks
> for each color. But it keeps this superior design for more expansive
> printers.
>
> http://h10010.www1.hp.com/wwpc/us/en/sm/WF25a/18972-236...
> http://h10010.www1.hp.com/wwpc/us/en/sm/WF25a/18972-236...
>
> http://h10010.www1.hp.com/wwpc/pscmisc/vac/us/product_p...
>
> "Choose HP's most cost-effective color printer for
> general office use. Save money initially and over time,
> with a low purchase price and four individual
> high-capacity replacement ink cartridges that reduce
> intervention and deliver consistent, outstanding print
> quality and lowest cost-per-page. Each of the four ink
> cartridges holds a single color, so when a cartridge
> runs out, replace only that color, eliminating waste.
> Four separate, long-lasting printheads are another
> important element of the economical design-you don't
> throw away a functional printhead when replacing an
> empty cartridge."
>
>
>> I guess you can always buy a refill kit and
>>get a little more life out of those carts?
>
>
> But it's not as easy as in case of Canon, where you just pop 3-rd party
> cartridge instead of original, for 1/5 the price. In Hp you either toy with
> syringes, smear your hands with ink, deal with ink flowing out of the
> cartrigde, and have a problem with resetting printer settings - as hp
> printers have protections against refillers built in. Or you buy refilled
> cartridge, which is unfortunately expansive - costs 1/2 of original
> cartridge price.
>
> I wouldn't count on on HP reliability too much. I used them in the past and
> had a lot of problems with paper tray - in all models. Like taking multiple
> sheets at once. Over time paper trays started working worse, at the end it
> only accepted 1 sheet of paper at once. I guess it's kind of an planned
> obsolescence on HP's part, as even Lexmark printers have very good and
> reliable paper handling mechanism.
November 20, 2004 11:25:14 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Brian wrote:

>I have a canon s750 with a burnt out print head. I haven't been able to
>find a new print head for sale anywhere, but I hear they are expensive.

You won't find them for sale...you have to order from Canon.

> All of the logic behind the separate print head makes sense, and it's
>the reason I went with Canon in the first place. However, given the
>extreme cost for fixing it, I'm not sure it's worth it.

That was my dilemma as well.

Canon would not guarantee a new printhead either. If it didn't work
because of some kind of problem with the printer, I was stuck with an
$80 head and still have a dead printer.

>So this brings up the question: Did my print head fail abnormally? I
>had been using cheap replacement ink carts, and only print a few pages a
>month. If I had bought better quality ink, would the head not have failed?

I doubt it...I'm starting to see and hear of more failures in various
areas, including a friend of mine who used an i550 for about 16 months
using genuine Canon ink tanks only, and his printhead died after about
2500 pages. A friend in a computer shop said he is seeing a lot of Canon
printhead failures too.

>I'm stuck here now trying to figure out if I should buy a new printer
>(I'm intrigued by the multifunction devices), or keep spending money
>trying to fix the one I have.

At todays prices, I suggest you buy a new printer, regardless of brand.
You get a new unit with full warranty and a new set of ink cartridges. I
honestly don't believe the costs justify repair.
Anonymous
November 20, 2004 11:25:14 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

"Brian" <spam.is@ikilling.invalid> wrote in message
news:JKNnd.5027$1u.630@twister.nyroc.rr.com...
> Thanks for your great insight into this.
>
> OK, so this leaves me in this position:
> I have a canon s750 with a burnt out print head. I haven't been able to
> find a new print head for sale anywhere, but I hear they are expensive.
> All of the logic behind the separate print head makes sense, and it's the
> reason I went with Canon in the first place. However, given the extreme
> cost for fixing it, I'm not sure it's worth it.
>
> So this brings up the question: Did my print head fail abnormally? I had
> been using cheap replacement ink carts, and only print a few pages a
> month. If I had bought better quality ink, would the head not have
> failed?
>
> I'm stuck here now trying to figure out if I should buy a new printer (I'm
> intrigued by the multifunction devices), or keep spending money trying to
> fix the one I have.
>

Well you can get a new S750 printhead direct from Canon Sales or a local
Canon ASF, or even here
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=...
for about $60. Now while it is VERY likely the problem you experience is due
to a failed printhead, you have to keep in mind it may be something else.
With the cost of a new Canon iP3000 being just $39 more than the printhead
and considering it will provide not only a new head, but also printer with
added features (higher resolution, auto-duplexer, dual paper paths, etc) and
a fresh warranty, IMHO I would probably opt for the new printer. That is of
course unless you know someone that has a printer that uses the same head
and confirm your S750 is a bad PH and want to save $39.
Anonymous
November 20, 2004 11:25:15 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

"Bill" <bill@c.a> wrote in message news:VtWdnekqo-HCXALcRVn-qQ@golden.net...
> Brian wrote:
>
>>I have a canon s750 with a burnt out print head. I haven't been able to
>>find a new print head for sale anywhere, but I hear they are expensive.
>
> You won't find them for sale...you have to order from Canon.
>

Not true, PartsNow and others also carry them.
Anonymous
November 21, 2004 5:23:00 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

I suppose you simply can't expect reliablility from an inkjet printer
nowadays. They are not build to last. Some time before, when inkjets were
more expansive quality seemed to be higher, now it's all shoddy. From my
experience quality starts with office-class laser printers that have 500
sheet paper tray and 30+ pages per minute speeds. This kind of hardware is
build solidly and works without problems even on high load.

I wouldn't count on HP to provide reliable inkjet. All HP inkjets I dealt
with had some problems with paper handling mechanism - jamming, pulling
multiple sheets or no sheet at all, pulling paper at an angle instead of
straight etc. All these problems had been hardly visible at first, then they
started getting worse with time. On the other hand they were all printing
very well looking text, and their heads rarely clogged even when left for a
few weeks of non-use. I wouldn't recommend HP for graphics printing mainly
because of too high cost of color ikjet cartridges.
November 21, 2004 5:26:26 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

mpx wrote:

>I suppose you simply can't expect reliablility from an inkjet printer
>nowadays. They are not build to last. Some time before, when inkjets were
>more expansive quality seemed to be higher, now it's all shoddy. From my
>experience quality starts with office-class laser printers that have 500
>sheet paper tray and 30+ pages per minute speeds. This kind of hardware is
>build solidly and works without problems even on high load.

While I tend to agree somewhat, I don't think you have to spend a lot of
money to get a decent printer. I've owned several printers, both inkjet
and laser, over the years, and I've found that durability is not always
linked directly to purchase cost, but there does seem to be a negative
curve of diminishing returns.

I recently had to replace a dead Canon i850 with another printer. I went
back to HP since I've had better reliability from their hardware. When
shopping, I compared several models and found I preferred the design and
build quality of models starting around the $200 price point. Some
models below that felt flimsy and cheap, while some more expensive
models also felt flimsy.

Just a few of the things I look for in a durable model that I expect to
last are expandability, solid case and chassis, weight, and logical
design.

>I wouldn't count on HP to provide reliable inkjet. All HP inkjets I dealt
>with had some problems with paper handling mechanism - jamming, pulling
>multiple sheets or no sheet at all, pulling paper at an angle instead of
>straight etc.

I've never had paper handling issues with HP, nor any brand really. I've
dealt with models that have had 50,000+ sheets put through them, and no
signs of paper handling issues. However, I've also maintained the
printers by ensuring the rollers don't get excessively dirty. Cleaning
the pick-up rollers a few times a year with a damp cloth does wonders.

> On the other hand they were all printing
>very well looking text, and their heads rarely clogged even when left for a
>few weeks of non-use.

That has been my experience as well. Their inkjet printers have
traditionally been able to endure long periods of in activity without
clogging. I had an old HP Deskjet 520 printer sit in a closet for an
entire year unused, and when connected to my parents computer, it
printed just fine.

> I wouldn't recommend HP for graphics printing mainly
>because of too high cost of color ikjet cartridges.

After using a Canon i850 printer for 16 months, I don't agree with that
statement anymore.

I have first-hand experience that shows ink usage is similar to HP and
costs are also similar, under typical use. For instance, the Canon ink
tanks cost less per colour, but about the same when you buy all three.
In another recent post I mentioned this:

While the Canon individual ink tanks are cheaper PER COLOUR, they're not
cheaper when bought in sets of three, which is required if you intend to
print in colour or make photos.

For example, here in Canada a large colour cartridge (#97) for my HP
6540 from Staples is $49.96. Yet an equal set of three Canon ink tanks
is $53.88 (3x$17.96) for about the same page yields.

So when you go to the store and buy a Canon ink tank, you THINK you're
saving money because it only costs you about $20 that one time. But the
next day when the other colours run out and you buy two more of the ink
tanks, you've spent the same amount of money on ink.

Canon is using the ILLUSION of lower individual prices to make is seem
like you're saving money, when in fact you're not. It's all marketing
hype.
Anonymous
November 22, 2004 12:46:53 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

I have both HP and Cannon. HP45a black cartridges for my 970 are about $26
each, refill spec say 40 ml ink.
Cannon BCI-6 Black are $11 each for 13 ml ink.
Work it out yourself!!
Doug

"Bill" <bill@c.a> wrote in message news:weSdnbCoo81-dj3cRVn-vQ@golden.net...
> mpx wrote:
>
> >I suppose you simply can't expect reliablility from an inkjet printer
> >nowadays. They are not build to last. Some time before, when inkjets were
> >more expansive quality seemed to be higher, now it's all shoddy. From my
> >experience quality starts with office-class laser printers that have 500
> >sheet paper tray and 30+ pages per minute speeds. This kind of hardware
is
> >build solidly and works without problems even on high load.
>
> While I tend to agree somewhat, I don't think you have to spend a lot of
> money to get a decent printer. I've owned several printers, both inkjet
> and laser, over the years, and I've found that durability is not always
> linked directly to purchase cost, but there does seem to be a negative
> curve of diminishing returns.
>
> I recently had to replace a dead Canon i850 with another printer. I went
> back to HP since I've had better reliability from their hardware. When
> shopping, I compared several models and found I preferred the design and
> build quality of models starting around the $200 price point. Some
> models below that felt flimsy and cheap, while some more expensive
> models also felt flimsy.
>
> Just a few of the things I look for in a durable model that I expect to
> last are expandability, solid case and chassis, weight, and logical
> design.
>
> >I wouldn't count on HP to provide reliable inkjet. All HP inkjets I dealt
> >with had some problems with paper handling mechanism - jamming, pulling
> >multiple sheets or no sheet at all, pulling paper at an angle instead of
> >straight etc.
>
> I've never had paper handling issues with HP, nor any brand really. I've
> dealt with models that have had 50,000+ sheets put through them, and no
> signs of paper handling issues. However, I've also maintained the
> printers by ensuring the rollers don't get excessively dirty. Cleaning
> the pick-up rollers a few times a year with a damp cloth does wonders.
>
> > On the other hand they were all printing
> >very well looking text, and their heads rarely clogged even when left for
a
> >few weeks of non-use.
>
> That has been my experience as well. Their inkjet printers have
> traditionally been able to endure long periods of in activity without
> clogging. I had an old HP Deskjet 520 printer sit in a closet for an
> entire year unused, and when connected to my parents computer, it
> printed just fine.
>
> > I wouldn't recommend HP for graphics printing mainly
> >because of too high cost of color ikjet cartridges.
>
> After using a Canon i850 printer for 16 months, I don't agree with that
> statement anymore.
>
> I have first-hand experience that shows ink usage is similar to HP and
> costs are also similar, under typical use. For instance, the Canon ink
> tanks cost less per colour, but about the same when you buy all three.
> In another recent post I mentioned this:
>
> While the Canon individual ink tanks are cheaper PER COLOUR, they're not
> cheaper when bought in sets of three, which is required if you intend to
> print in colour or make photos.
>
> For example, here in Canada a large colour cartridge (#97) for my HP
> 6540 from Staples is $49.96. Yet an equal set of three Canon ink tanks
> is $53.88 (3x$17.96) for about the same page yields.
>
> So when you go to the store and buy a Canon ink tank, you THINK you're
> saving money because it only costs you about $20 that one time. But the
> next day when the other colours run out and you buy two more of the ink
> tanks, you've spent the same amount of money on ink.
>
> Canon is using the ILLUSION of lower individual prices to make is seem
> like you're saving money, when in fact you're not. It's all marketing
> hype.
November 22, 2004 12:46:54 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Doug Cutler wrote:

>I have both HP and Cannon. HP45a black cartridges for my 970 are about $26
>each, refill spec say 40 ml ink.
>Cannon BCI-6 Black are $11 each for 13 ml ink.
>Work it out yourself!!

Unfortunately ink volume does not equate to page yield. If it did, your
45a would yield roughly 3x the pages of the Canon, but we both know it
doesn't.

For instance, the HP 45a has 42ml of ink, and produces ~833 pages.
But the newer HP 96 has only 21ml of ink, and produces ~800 pages.
The Canon BCI-3e/BK contains 26ml of ink, and produces ~450 pages.
!