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Clock

Last response: in Windows 95/98/ME
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September 7, 2004 12:25:10 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win95.general.discussion (More info?)

I run windows 95. My clock will not keep proper time. When the computer is
restarted, the clock DOES NOT reset to the correct time. The clock runs
slow, after about five days the clock will be on "yesterday". I have
searched through the trouble shooting pages that microsoft has, but none of
them addressed this problem. Does anyone know if there is a "fix" to this
problenm?

More about : clock

Anonymous
September 7, 2004 3:05:02 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win95.general.discussion (More info?)

"savage" <savage@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:1B633CFE-778F-48EB-AE46-73977F036946@microsoft.com...
> I run windows 95. My clock will not keep proper time. When the computer
is
> restarted, the clock DOES NOT reset to the correct time. The clock runs
> slow, after about five days the clock will be on "yesterday". I have
> searched through the trouble shooting pages that microsoft has, but none
of
> them addressed this problem. Does anyone know if there is a "fix" to this
> problenm?

Have you considered replacing the motherboard battery?
Anonymous
September 7, 2004 4:08:17 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win95.general.discussion (More info?)

Hre a web site that discusses clock problems:
http://www.itc.virginia.edu/desktop/dci/timeloss.html


System clock loses time
Globe and Mail Update

QUESTION: My clock loses time. System is 3 to 4 years old. Is battery
the only problem?

ANSWER: If the clock is losing time when the computer is turned off
then it's the battery. If the computer is 3 to 4 years old it is very
likely the battery is removable (like a big watch battery) and can be
easily replaced.

If you don't want to replace it most motherboards will boot up with
the default settings so the computer will continue to work after the
battery dies but the date will be reset on every reboot.

If the computer is losing time while it is running that is another
matter entirely and may be related to a software issue or time
synching software that is running (if it's synching with the wrong
time zone).

If the clock is right when you boot the machine, and it slows down as
the system runs, you are probably suffering from the problem described
in Microsoft's Knowledge Base article 189706.

In it, Microsoft says that systems running Windows 98, Windows 98SE,
Windows 95 and Windows ME may lose anywhere from two minutes to an
hour per day.

The cause can be Advanced Power Management (APM) settings in the BIOS,
or certain types of software running on the PC.

Microsoft advises that you make sure APM is not configured in BIOS
(Dell can advise you here), and let Windows handle power management.
It also suggests that you (and I'm quoting directly from the Knowledge
Base article here) "Disable the following types of programs and
utilities: Anti-virus, screensavers, system utilities.

I'd advise ignoring the bit about disabling your anti-virus software —
it was written in kinder days, when viruses were rarer and unable to
spread as wildly as they do today. However, screen savers and system
utilities can gobble cycles, and should be turned off. You'll probably
notice better performance as well as a more accurate clock.


Microsoft Knowledge Base Article - 169550

Windows 95 Clock Loses Time with APM Enabled

SYMPTOMS
When you enable Advanced Power Management (APM) on a computer running
Windows 95, the Windows 95 clock may slow down or stop when the
computer switches to suspended mode. However, the system clock
continues to keep the correct time and you can reset the Windows 95
clock to the correct time by restarting the computer.

CAUSE
This behavior can occur if either of the following conditions exists:
You enabled APM in the computer's CMOS settings after Windows 95 was
installed.
Your computer's BIOS supports an older version of APM.

RESOLUTION
To resolve this issue, use the appropriate method.
Enabled APM After Installing Windows 95
If you enabled APM in your computer's CMOS settings after installing
Windows 95, Windows 95 APM support may not have been installed.
Reinstall Windows 95 to install APM support.

To verify that APM support is enabled, follow these steps:
In Control Panel, double-click the System icon.
On the Device Manager tab, double-click the System Devices branch to
expand it.
Double-click Advanced Power Management Support.
On the Settings tab, verify that the Enable Power Management Support
check box is selected.
APM Support Is Installed
If APM support is installed, suspend the computer by clicking the
Start button and then clicking Suspend before the computer switches to
suspended mode.
Computer's BIOS Supports an Older Version of APM
You may be able to resolve this issue by upgrading the computer's
BIOS. Contact the computer's manufacturer for information about a
possible BIOS upgrade.

For additional information about BIOS support for APM, see the
following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
137402 APM Features May Be Unavailable in Windows 95

The information in this article applies to:
Microsoft Windows 95


Microsoft Knowledge Base Article - 189706

Windows Clock on Taskbar and in Date/Time Tool Loses Time

SYMPTOMS
When you use the Date/Time tool in Control Panel to select a different
year, the clock may stop until you click Apply or OK and the clock
does not compensate for the length of time it was stopped.
or
When you use the Date/Time tool to select a different month or date,
the time may be decreased by 5-10 seconds.
or
When you leave your computer on for an extended amount of time, the
time may lose from two minutes to an hour per day.IMPORTANT: The CMOS
does keep the correct time and if you restart the computer, the
Windows clock is updated. Also, if you start your computer in Safe
Mode, Windows does not lose time.

NOTE: If either of the symptoms listed in this article occur, the
Windows clock on the taskbar and in the Date/Time tool in Control
Panel may experience a loss of time.

CAUSE
This last symptom listed in this article can occur for either of the
following reasons:
Advanced Power Management (APM) settings are enabled in the BIOS.
You configure your computer to use third-party anti-virus, system
utility, and screen saver programs.

RESOLUTION
To resolve the issue for the last symptom listed in this article, use
one of the following methods:
APM Settings
Disable APM in the BIOS and configure Windows to manage APM. For
information about how to disable APM in the BIOS, please contact the
manufacturer of your computer.

To configure Windows to manage APM:
Click Start, point to Settings, and then click Control Panel.
Double-click Power Management, select the settings you want for APM,
and then click OK.
Disable Third-Party Programs and Utilities
Disable the following types of programs and utilities:
Anti-virus
Screen savers
System utilities
Clean Boot
Configure your computer to start with a clean boot. For additional
information about configuring a clean boot, click the article numbers
below to view the articles in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
192926 How to Perform Clean-Boot Troubleshooting for Windows 98

243039 How to Perform a Clean Boot in Windows 95

STATUS
Microsoft has confirmed that this is a problem in the Microsoft
products that are listed at the beginning of this article.
MORE INFORMATION
If your computer loses time, use the Date/Time tool to set the correct
time:
Click Start, point to Settings, and then click Control Panel.
Double-click Date/Time.
On the Date & Time tab, configure the correct time, and then click OK.
To determine if the time loss is a result of a weak computer battery:
Click Start, point to Programs, and then click MS-DOS Prompt.
At the command prompt, type time, and then press ENTER.
Compare this time with the time that is reported by the clock on the
taskbar.
Type exit, and then press ENTER.
If the computer's time and the time on the clock are different, the
computer's battery may be too weak to keep accurate time, and it
should be replaced. For information about how to replace the battery,
refer to the documentation included with your computer.

NOTE: This problem does not affect the clock in your computer's CMOS.
The information in this article applies to:
Microsoft Windows 98
Microsoft Windows 95
Microsoft Windows 98 Second Edition
Microsoft Windows Millennium Edition

Bill Starbuck (MVP)
!