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A .exe linked to missing export USER32.DLL:BroadcastSystem..

Last response: in Windows 95/98/ME
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Anonymous
February 10, 2005 1:37:03 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win95.general.discussion (More info?)

On executing a .exe file in Windows 95 two error messages appeared: 1)
Relating to the .exe file "a device attached to the system is not
functioning." However, in the present situation I did not see any
exclamation points in "Device Manager" indicating any hardware was not
functioning properly. 2) "The .....exe file is linked to missing export
USER32.DLL:BroadcastSystemMessageA." I assume for now that the first problem
is due to the second problem, since in the present situation there are no
exclamation points that I saw appearing in the Device-Manager list of the
computer's hardware.

The second problem is discussed in the Microsoft knowlege base article
number 182809 (KB182809). It seems to be that in Windows 95 the file
user32.dll doesn't export BroadcastSystemMessageA, whereas Windows 98's
user32.dll file does. So the problem apparently doesn't exist in Windows 98,
which must use a different version of user32.dll than Windows 95 does. The
recommended resolution in Windows 95 is to change the source code of the
Windows-95 application as specified in KB182809. Since the source code of
the basic application I want to use is propietary and unavailable to me, that
resolution is not possible in this case. So another approach could be to
obtain a user32.dll file that will work in Windows 95 that exports
BroadcastSystemMessageA. Now the one I have been using is user32.dll version
4.00.950 in Windows 95's version 4.00.950 C, to which I had added some
updates and probably Service Pack 1. So user32.dll 4.00.950 is apparently
not new enough to include an export of BroadcastSystemMessageA. From
http://www.iocomp.com/?http://www.iocomp.com/faq/acx/FA... I saw that
Windows 98 can use version 4.10.2227 of user32.dll and I had the impression
that a DCOM95 update should include user32.dll; but at
http://www.nfc.usda.gov/support/hdg/pcbased/hdg8.htm#C I didn't see
user32.dll in a file list for DCOM95.

Questions:
1a. Is it true that DCOM95 version 1.3 includes the file user32.dll?
1b. If so, is the version of it higher than 4.00.950 and does it include a
such an export?
2a. Would a Windows-98 user32.dll, like version 4.10.2227 of it, work in
Windows 95?
2b. Another more general way to phrase question 2a is to ask if a higher
version of a Windows file than in the Windows system you have will always
work in that Windows operating system, even if it is shipped with a higher
version of Windows than the one you have?
2c. The solutions to this problem seem to be quite limited, if there are
any at all in Windows 95. If the answer is yes to question 2a, would this be
a solution consistent with the End-User License Agreement (EULA) for Windows
95?
2d. If so, where could I obtain a user32.dll for Windows 98, in DCOM98
version 1.3 or elsewhere?
2e. If it is considered a violation of the Windows-95 EULA, what else, if
anything, could I do in Windows 95 to solve this problem?
3. The thinking here is well beyond the experience that I have had; so it
may not be possible. But is it possible to make C++ application that uses
the propietary .exe application, adds to it a header file that includes the
statements in KB182809:

#include <windows.h>
#ifdef BroadcastSystemMessage
#undef BroadcastSystemMessage
#define BroadcastSystemMessage BroadcastSystemMessage
#endif

, and incorporates the propietary .exe file in a compilation in Visual C++
5.0 that I have, in such a way that the problem is solved outside of Windows
95's files?
Anonymous
February 10, 2005 8:26:16 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win95.general.discussion (More info?)

"AboutWindowsPoster" <AboutWindowsPoster@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in
message news:85667462-72C7-469C-9EB1-4D515CA786E6@microsoft.com...
>
> 2a. Would a Windows-98 user32.dll, like version 4.10.2227 of it, work in
> Windows 95?
>

It would be better if you just installed the app on WIN98 or higher. It
obviously
is not designed for Windows 95, hence the error message.
Anonymous
February 10, 2005 9:26:25 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win95.general.discussion (More info?)

The software you are running was not designed for your version of Windows.
It would be very difficult to modify Windows to suit the software, but it
might be possible for the manufacturer to modify the software to be
compatible with a wider range of Windows versions. That's why the
recommendation is to change the source code.

You cannot change the source code by including the EXE into a new build with
a new header. You should ask the manufacturer whether they have a version of
the software that is compatible with your system. Most manufacturers who
were affected by this problem created replacement versions of their
applications, providing they were supporting the W95 platform at the time.
However, in many cases the problem only occurred because the manufacturer
didn't test their product with W95, usually because they never intended
that it would be compatible with Windows version prior to W98

Using a W98 version of a system file in W95 is likely to lead to disaster.
In any case, I suspect that if you solved this issue there would be many
others to follow.

However, if you are confident that the software should be compatible with
W95, and that this problem is the only thing that will stop it from running,
then there may be a solution worth trying. Go here and install the Unicode
layer. It intercepts many calls to functions in User32, including
BroadcastSystemMessage, and it's possible that it will process these calls
correctly. I have not tested it or examined it in detail, but it's certainly
worth a try.
http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyI...
--
Jeff Richards
MS MVP (Windows - Shell/User)
"AboutWindowsPoster" <AboutWindowsPoster@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in
message news:85667462-72C7-469C-9EB1-4D515CA786E6@microsoft.com...
> On executing a .exe file in Windows 95 two error messages appeared: 1)
> Relating to the .exe file "a device attached to the system is not
> functioning." However, in the present situation I did not see any
> exclamation points in "Device Manager" indicating any hardware was not
> functioning properly. 2) "The .....exe file is linked to missing export
> USER32.DLL:BroadcastSystemMessageA." I assume for now that the first
> problem
> is due to the second problem, since in the present situation there are no
> exclamation points that I saw appearing in the Device-Manager list of the
> computer's hardware.
>
> The second problem is discussed in the Microsoft knowlege base article
> number 182809 (KB182809). It seems to be that in Windows 95 the file
> user32.dll doesn't export BroadcastSystemMessageA, whereas Windows 98's
> user32.dll file does. So the problem apparently doesn't exist in Windows
> 98,
> which must use a different version of user32.dll than Windows 95 does.
> The
> recommended resolution in Windows 95 is to change the source code of the
> Windows-95 application as specified in KB182809. Since the source code of
> the basic application I want to use is propietary and unavailable to me,
> that
> resolution is not possible in this case. So another approach could be to
> obtain a user32.dll file that will work in Windows 95 that exports
> BroadcastSystemMessageA. Now the one I have been using is user32.dll
> version
> 4.00.950 in Windows 95's version 4.00.950 C, to which I had added some
> updates and probably Service Pack 1. So user32.dll 4.00.950 is apparently
> not new enough to include an export of BroadcastSystemMessageA. From
> http://www.iocomp.com/?http://www.iocomp.com/faq/acx/FA... I saw that
> Windows 98 can use version 4.10.2227 of user32.dll and I had the
> impression
> that a DCOM95 update should include user32.dll; but at
> http://www.nfc.usda.gov/support/hdg/pcbased/hdg8.htm#C I didn't see
> user32.dll in a file list for DCOM95.
>
> Questions:
> 1a. Is it true that DCOM95 version 1.3 includes the file user32.dll?
> 1b. If so, is the version of it higher than 4.00.950 and does it include
> a
> such an export?
> 2a. Would a Windows-98 user32.dll, like version 4.10.2227 of it, work in
> Windows 95?
> 2b. Another more general way to phrase question 2a is to ask if a higher
> version of a Windows file than in the Windows system you have will always
> work in that Windows operating system, even if it is shipped with a higher
> version of Windows than the one you have?
> 2c. The solutions to this problem seem to be quite limited, if there are
> any at all in Windows 95. If the answer is yes to question 2a, would this
> be
> a solution consistent with the End-User License Agreement (EULA) for
> Windows
> 95?
> 2d. If so, where could I obtain a user32.dll for Windows 98, in DCOM98
> version 1.3 or elsewhere?
> 2e. If it is considered a violation of the Windows-95 EULA, what else, if
> anything, could I do in Windows 95 to solve this problem?
> 3. The thinking here is well beyond the experience that I have had; so it
> may not be possible. But is it possible to make C++ application that uses
> the propietary .exe application, adds to it a header file that includes
> the
> statements in KB182809:
>
> #include <windows.h>
> #ifdef BroadcastSystemMessage
> #undef BroadcastSystemMessage
> #define BroadcastSystemMessage BroadcastSystemMessage
> #endif
>
> , and incorporates the propietary .exe file in a compilation in Visual C++
> 5.0 that I have, in such a way that the problem is solved outside of
> Windows
> 95's files?
Related resources
Anonymous
February 11, 2005 1:37:02 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win95.general.discussion (More info?)

Thanks, Jeff, for kindly taking the time to think about this problem and post
the possible solution of adding the Microsoft Layer for Unicode (MSLU) to
Windows 95. I downloaded it by clicking the “Download� button at
http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyI....
Running the downloaded unicows.exe file just extracts a few files into a
directory of one's choosing. The important file among them seems to be
unicows.dll. Now comes the difficulty: What should one do with unicows.dll?
The answer to this question seems to be integrated with what I understand the
purpose of MSLU to be: to add a layer of Unicode to Windows 95 so that
applications which need Unicode will run. But my impression from what I have
read on the Internet is that an application may have to be written to call or
load MSLU. (According to the download site for MSLU, the instructions for
using MSLU are in the Platform Software Development Kit (PSDK), which I
understand could be a very large download. Also another file that is needed
is unicows.lib in this PSDK.) Am I right about this? If so, then with an
application which has already been written and for which source code is
unavailable to me, I am too late in the process to make use of MSLU. Is this
correct or not? Nevertheless I did read that an MSN-Messenger installation
installs unicows.dll in MSN Messenger's own directory. Sure enough in the
MSN-Messenger-5.0 installation directory C:\Program Files\MSN Messenger on
the Windows-95-loaded computer I did find unicows.dll. So I did try placing
unicows.dll in the directory of the application I wanted to test in Windows
95. But there was no improvement in its performance; besides I doubt that
the previously completed application would call this unicows.dll that I just
placed there.

Now from http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;182809 I
read that the file winuser.h probably for Windows 95 includes:

#ifdef UNICODE
#define BroadcastSystemMessage BroadcastSystemMessageW
#else
#define BroadcastSystemMessage BroadcastSystemMessageA
#endif
..

So I guess that if MSLU could be added to an application, perhaps that might
make “#ifdef UNICODE� be true and then define BroadcastSystemMessage and
BroadcastSystemMessageW. If so, I see at least one problem:
BroadcastSystemMessageW, just like BroadcastSystemMessageA, is not exported
by Windows-95's user32.dll. This I had already read on the Internet after a
Google search; but following
http://groups-beta.google.com/group/borland.public.cpp....,
in Windows Explorer right-mouse-clicking on user32.dll in C:\Windows\System,
opening this file in Notepad, and then clicking the Search menu, then Find,
entering BroadcastSystemMessage in the edit control, and then clicking the
“Find-Next� button a couple of times showed that only BroadcastSystemMessage,
not BroadcastSystemA or BroadcastSystemMessageW, is found in Windows-95's
user32.dll. So I guess that even if one could add MSLU to an application in
Windows 95, that that alone would not solve the missing-export of
BroadcastSystemMessageA in Windows-95's user32.dll. One would instead have
to add the code suggested in
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;182809. For an
expert out there (not I), does my reasoning look okay here?

Now if in user32.dll in Notepad I just typed BroadcastSystemMessageA after
BroadcastSystemMessage, which seemed to be in a long list of other functions,
and saved the edited user32.dll, I wonder if that would solve the problem;
there were also strange characters in user32.dll in Notepad. But I guess
that changing this code could be a violation of Microsoft's End-User License
Agreement (EULA) for Windows 95. Would this editing be such a violation? If
so, what other ideas does someone have to solve this problem?

The following is not practical. But for the purpose of my education, if the
file winuser.h were available to end users of Windows 95, I guess that
another approach could be to change the winuser.h line “#define
BroadcastSystemMessage BroadcastSystemMessageA� to read just “#define
BroadcastSystemMessage.� Is this thinking correct, if there are no other
references to BroadcastSystemMessageA in Windows-95 source code?

"Jeff Richards" wrote:

> The software you are running was not designed for your version of Windows.
> It would be very difficult to modify Windows to suit the software, but it
> might be possible for the manufacturer to modify the software to be
> compatible with a wider range of Windows versions. That's why the
> recommendation is to change the source code.
>
> You cannot change the source code by including the EXE into a new build with
> a new header. You should ask the manufacturer whether they have a version of
> the software that is compatible with your system. Most manufacturers who
> were affected by this problem created replacement versions of their
> applications, providing they were supporting the W95 platform at the time.
> However, in many cases the problem only occurred because the manufacturer
> didn't test their product with W95, usually because they never intended
> that it would be compatible with Windows version prior to W98
>
> Using a W98 version of a system file in W95 is likely to lead to disaster.
> In any case, I suspect that if you solved this issue there would be many
> others to follow.
>
> However, if you are confident that the software should be compatible with
> W95, and that this problem is the only thing that will stop it from running,
> then there may be a solution worth trying. Go here and install the Unicode
> layer. It intercepts many calls to functions in User32, including
> BroadcastSystemMessage, and it's possible that it will process these calls
> correctly. I have not tested it or examined it in detail, but it's certainly
> worth a try.
> http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyI...
> --
> Jeff Richards
> MS MVP (Windows - Shell/User)
> "AboutWindowsPoster" <AboutWindowsPoster@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in
> message news:85667462-72C7-469C-9EB1-4D515CA786E6@microsoft.com...
> > On executing a .exe file in Windows 95 two error messages appeared: 1)
> > Relating to the .exe file "a device attached to the system is not
> > functioning." However, in the present situation I did not see any
> > exclamation points in "Device Manager" indicating any hardware was not
> > functioning properly. 2) "The .....exe file is linked to missing export
> > USER32.DLL:BroadcastSystemMessageA." I assume for now that the first
> > problem
> > is due to the second problem, since in the present situation there are no
> > exclamation points that I saw appearing in the Device-Manager list of the
> > computer's hardware.
> >
> > The second problem is discussed in the Microsoft knowlege base article
> > number 182809 (KB182809). It seems to be that in Windows 95 the file
> > user32.dll doesn't export BroadcastSystemMessageA, whereas Windows 98's
> > user32.dll file does. So the problem apparently doesn't exist in Windows
> > 98,
> > which must use a different version of user32.dll than Windows 95 does.
> > The
> > recommended resolution in Windows 95 is to change the source code of the
> > Windows-95 application as specified in KB182809. Since the source code of
> > the basic application I want to use is propietary and unavailable to me,
> > that
> > resolution is not possible in this case. So another approach could be to
> > obtain a user32.dll file that will work in Windows 95 that exports
> > BroadcastSystemMessageA. Now the one I have been using is user32.dll
> > version
> > 4.00.950 in Windows 95's version 4.00.950 C, to which I had added some
> > updates and probably Service Pack 1. So user32.dll 4.00.950 is apparently
> > not new enough to include an export of BroadcastSystemMessageA. From
> > http://www.iocomp.com/?http://www.iocomp.com/faq/acx/FA... I saw that
> > Windows 98 can use version 4.10.2227 of user32.dll and I had the
> > impression
> > that a DCOM95 update should include user32.dll; but at
> > http://www.nfc.usda.gov/support/hdg/pcbased/hdg8.htm#C I didn't see
> > user32.dll in a file list for DCOM95.
> >
> > Questions:
> > 1a. Is it true that DCOM95 version 1.3 includes the file user32.dll?
> > 1b. If so, is the version of it higher than 4.00.950 and does it include
> > a
> > such an export?
> > 2a. Would a Windows-98 user32.dll, like version 4.10.2227 of it, work in
> > Windows 95?
> > 2b. Another more general way to phrase question 2a is to ask if a higher
> > version of a Windows file than in the Windows system you have will always
> > work in that Windows operating system, even if it is shipped with a higher
> > version of Windows than the one you have?
> > 2c. The solutions to this problem seem to be quite limited, if there are
> > any at all in Windows 95. If the answer is yes to question 2a, would this
> > be
> > a solution consistent with the End-User License Agreement (EULA) for
> > Windows
> > 95?
> > 2d. If so, where could I obtain a user32.dll for Windows 98, in DCOM98
> > version 1.3 or elsewhere?
> > 2e. If it is considered a violation of the Windows-95 EULA, what else, if
> > anything, could I do in Windows 95 to solve this problem?
> > 3. The thinking here is well beyond the experience that I have had; so it
> > may not be possible. But is it possible to make C++ application that uses
> > the propietary .exe application, adds to it a header file that includes
> > the
> > statements in KB182809:
> >
> > #include <windows.h>
> > #ifdef BroadcastSystemMessage
> > #undef BroadcastSystemMessage
> > #define BroadcastSystemMessage BroadcastSystemMessage
> > #endif
> >
> > , and incorporates the propietary .exe file in a compilation in Visual C++
> > 5.0 that I have, in such a way that the problem is solved outside of
> > Windows
> > 95's files?
>
>
>
Anonymous
February 12, 2005 12:21:03 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win95.general.discussion (More info?)

The download I mentioned is for developers to use to make their UNICODE
applications compliant with W95, and therefore is no use to you. The one
you need (which I thought I was directing you to and seems to be no longer
available) is the one that the W95 user installs to make W95 compatible with
a UNICODE application. It's possible that this was never available, and I
have misunderstood some descriptions of the layer. I now can't find any of
the references that I can recall seeing in the past. The difference would be
that it contains the most recent available version of USER for W95. It was
an outside chance in any case.

You cannot change a compiled program by changing the header files - it's too
late, because the information from the header has already been incorporated
into the EXE or DLL. In theory you can edit the DLL, but not in Notepad.
You would need a byte editor, because the odd characters you see contain
values indicating the length of the string (which is what you are trying to
change). Typically, changing one or several letters is easy, but changing
the length of the text requires much more caution. You would need to edit
the byte that indicates how long the text is, and you would need to replace
the last character with a null. However, two nulls in a row usually
indicate the end of all text, so this might stop USER working for any
function that follows in the table.

The only other thing I can think of is some changes that were around a while
ago to get some Windows 98 features into Windows 95, without the overhead of
W98. It was called something like W98 Lite. This may have involved including
a W98 version of User, but I never looked at it in detail.

What was the response form the manufacturer when you enquired about a W95
version of the program?
--
Jeff Richards
MS MVP (Windows - Shell/User)
"AboutWindowsPoster" <AboutWindowsPoster@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in
message news:6312B2CB-89A0-4A69-921B-424E6541496F@microsoft.com...
> Thanks, Jeff, for kindly taking the time to think about this problem and
> post
> the possible solution of adding the Microsoft Layer for Unicode (MSLU) to
> Windows 95. I downloaded it by clicking the "Download" button at
> http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyI....
> Running the downloaded unicows.exe file just extracts a few files into a
> directory of one's choosing. The important file among them seems to be
> unicows.dll. Now comes the difficulty: What should one do with
> unicows.dll?
> The answer to this question seems to be integrated with what I understand
> the
> purpose of MSLU to be: to add a layer of Unicode to Windows 95 so that
> applications which need Unicode will run. But my impression from what I
> have
> read on the Internet is that an application may have to be written to call
> or
> load MSLU. (According to the download site for MSLU, the instructions for
> using MSLU are in the Platform Software Development Kit (PSDK), which I
> understand could be a very large download. Also another file that is
> needed
> is unicows.lib in this PSDK.) Am I right about this? If so, then with
> an
> application which has already been written and for which source code is
> unavailable to me, I am too late in the process to make use of MSLU. Is
> this
> correct or not? Nevertheless I did read that an MSN-Messenger
> installation
> installs unicows.dll in MSN Messenger's own directory. Sure enough in the
> MSN-Messenger-5.0 installation directory C:\Program Files\MSN Messenger on
> the Windows-95-loaded computer I did find unicows.dll. So I did try
> placing
> unicows.dll in the directory of the application I wanted to test in
> Windows
> 95. But there was no improvement in its performance; besides I doubt that
> the previously completed application would call this unicows.dll that I
> just
> placed there.
>
> Now from http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;182809 I
> read that the file winuser.h probably for Windows 95 includes:
>
> #ifdef UNICODE
> #define BroadcastSystemMessage BroadcastSystemMessageW
> #else
> #define BroadcastSystemMessage BroadcastSystemMessageA
> #endif
> .
>
> So I guess that if MSLU could be added to an application, perhaps that
> might
> make "#ifdef UNICODE" be true and then define BroadcastSystemMessage and
> BroadcastSystemMessageW. If so, I see at least one problem:
> BroadcastSystemMessageW, just like BroadcastSystemMessageA, is not
> exported
> by Windows-95's user32.dll. This I had already read on the Internet after
> a
> Google search; but following
> http://groups-beta.google.com/group/borland.public.cpp....,
> in Windows Explorer right-mouse-clicking on user32.dll in
> C:\Windows\System,
> opening this file in Notepad, and then clicking the Search menu, then
> Find,
> entering BroadcastSystemMessage in the edit control, and then clicking the
> "Find-Next" button a couple of times showed that only
> BroadcastSystemMessage,
> not BroadcastSystemA or BroadcastSystemMessageW, is found in Windows-95's
> user32.dll. So I guess that even if one could add MSLU to an application
> in
> Windows 95, that that alone would not solve the missing-export of
> BroadcastSystemMessageA in Windows-95's user32.dll. One would instead
> have
> to add the code suggested in
> http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;182809. For an
> expert out there (not I), does my reasoning look okay here?
>
> Now if in user32.dll in Notepad I just typed BroadcastSystemMessageA after
> BroadcastSystemMessage, which seemed to be in a long list of other
> functions,
> and saved the edited user32.dll, I wonder if that would solve the problem;
> there were also strange characters in user32.dll in Notepad. But I guess
> that changing this code could be a violation of Microsoft's End-User
> License
> Agreement (EULA) for Windows 95. Would this editing be such a violation?
> If
> so, what other ideas does someone have to solve this problem?
>
> The following is not practical. But for the purpose of my education, if
> the
> file winuser.h were available to end users of Windows 95, I guess that
> another approach could be to change the winuser.h line "#define
> BroadcastSystemMessage BroadcastSystemMessageA" to read just "#define
> BroadcastSystemMessage." Is this thinking correct, if there are no other
> references to BroadcastSystemMessageA in Windows-95 source code?
>
Anonymous
February 17, 2005 2:39:02 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win95.general.discussion (More info?)

Thanks again for your reply, Mr. Richards. I didn't really ask the software
producer for a Windows-95-compatible version of the program. Rather I asked
in a newsgroup if it would work in Windows 95. I think the responder
responded that he didn't know of any results of trials of the program in
Windows 95; and he wrote that I could try the program (in Windows 95) and
remove it if it didn't work properly in that environment. So I did try the
current version, then an older version which someone reported worked in
Windows 98, and found the missing export of BroadcastSystemMessageA that I
discussed when testing the latter version in Windows 95.

I found a completely different free program that is reported to work in
Windows 95 and is supposed to handle the part in which I have recently been
interested. So far I found that it works in Windows XP Home Edition, but
haven't tested it in Windows 95.

"Jeff Richards" wrote:

> The download I mentioned is for developers to use to make their UNICODE
> applications compliant with W95, and therefore is no use to you. The one
> you need (which I thought I was directing you to and seems to be no longer
> available) is the one that the W95 user installs to make W95 compatible with
> a UNICODE application. It's possible that this was never available, and I
> have misunderstood some descriptions of the layer. I now can't find any of
> the references that I can recall seeing in the past. The difference would be
> that it contains the most recent available version of USER for W95. It was
> an outside chance in any case.
>
> You cannot change a compiled program by changing the header files - it's too
> late, because the information from the header has already been incorporated
> into the EXE or DLL. In theory you can edit the DLL, but not in Notepad.
> You would need a byte editor, because the odd characters you see contain
> values indicating the length of the string (which is what you are trying to
> change). Typically, changing one or several letters is easy, but changing
> the length of the text requires much more caution. You would need to edit
> the byte that indicates how long the text is, and you would need to replace
> the last character with a null. However, two nulls in a row usually
> indicate the end of all text, so this might stop USER working for any
> function that follows in the table.
>
> The only other thing I can think of is some changes that were around a while
> ago to get some Windows 98 features into Windows 95, without the overhead of
> W98. It was called something like W98 Lite. This may have involved including
> a W98 version of User, but I never looked at it in detail.
>
> What was the response form the manufacturer when you enquired about a W95
> version of the program?
> --
> Jeff Richards
> MS MVP (Windows - Shell/User)
> "AboutWindowsPoster" <AboutWindowsPoster@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in
> message news:6312B2CB-89A0-4A69-921B-424E6541496F@microsoft.com...
> > Thanks, Jeff, for kindly taking the time to think about this problem and
> > post
> > the possible solution of adding the Microsoft Layer for Unicode (MSLU) to
> > Windows 95. I downloaded it by clicking the "Download" button at
> > http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyI....
> > Running the downloaded unicows.exe file just extracts a few files into a
> > directory of one's choosing. The important file among them seems to be
> > unicows.dll. Now comes the difficulty: What should one do with
> > unicows.dll?
> > The answer to this question seems to be integrated with what I understand
> > the
> > purpose of MSLU to be: to add a layer of Unicode to Windows 95 so that
> > applications which need Unicode will run. But my impression from what I
> > have
> > read on the Internet is that an application may have to be written to call
> > or
> > load MSLU. (According to the download site for MSLU, the instructions for
> > using MSLU are in the Platform Software Development Kit (PSDK), which I
> > understand could be a very large download. Also another file that is
> > needed
> > is unicows.lib in this PSDK.) Am I right about this? If so, then with
> > an
> > application which has already been written and for which source code is
> > unavailable to me, I am too late in the process to make use of MSLU. Is
> > this
> > correct or not? Nevertheless I did read that an MSN-Messenger
> > installation
> > installs unicows.dll in MSN Messenger's own directory. Sure enough in the
> > MSN-Messenger-5.0 installation directory C:\Program Files\MSN Messenger on
> > the Windows-95-loaded computer I did find unicows.dll. So I did try
> > placing
> > unicows.dll in the directory of the application I wanted to test in
> > Windows
> > 95. But there was no improvement in its performance; besides I doubt that
> > the previously completed application would call this unicows.dll that I
> > just
> > placed there.
> >
> > Now from http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;182809 I
> > read that the file winuser.h probably for Windows 95 includes:
> >
> > #ifdef UNICODE
> > #define BroadcastSystemMessage BroadcastSystemMessageW
> > #else
> > #define BroadcastSystemMessage BroadcastSystemMessageA
> > #endif
> > .
> >
> > So I guess that if MSLU could be added to an application, perhaps that
> > might
> > make "#ifdef UNICODE" be true and then define BroadcastSystemMessage and
> > BroadcastSystemMessageW. If so, I see at least one problem:
> > BroadcastSystemMessageW, just like BroadcastSystemMessageA, is not
> > exported
> > by Windows-95's user32.dll. This I had already read on the Internet after
> > a
> > Google search; but following
> > http://groups-beta.google.com/group/borland.public.cpp....,
> > in Windows Explorer right-mouse-clicking on user32.dll in
> > C:\Windows\System,
> > opening this file in Notepad, and then clicking the Search menu, then
> > Find,
> > entering BroadcastSystemMessage in the edit control, and then clicking the
> > "Find-Next" button a couple of times showed that only
> > BroadcastSystemMessage,
> > not BroadcastSystemA or BroadcastSystemMessageW, is found in Windows-95's
> > user32.dll. So I guess that even if one could add MSLU to an application
> > in
> > Windows 95, that that alone would not solve the missing-export of
> > BroadcastSystemMessageA in Windows-95's user32.dll. One would instead
> > have
> > to add the code suggested in
> > http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;182809. For an
> > expert out there (not I), does my reasoning look okay here?
> >
> > Now if in user32.dll in Notepad I just typed BroadcastSystemMessageA after
> > BroadcastSystemMessage, which seemed to be in a long list of other
> > functions,
> > and saved the edited user32.dll, I wonder if that would solve the problem;
> > there were also strange characters in user32.dll in Notepad. But I guess
> > that changing this code could be a violation of Microsoft's End-User
> > License
> > Agreement (EULA) for Windows 95. Would this editing be such a violation?
> > If
> > so, what other ideas does someone have to solve this problem?
> >
> > The following is not practical. But for the purpose of my education, if
> > the
> > file winuser.h were available to end users of Windows 95, I guess that
> > another approach could be to change the winuser.h line "#define
> > BroadcastSystemMessage BroadcastSystemMessageA" to read just "#define
> > BroadcastSystemMessage." Is this thinking correct, if there are no other
> > references to BroadcastSystemMessageA in Windows-95 source code?
> >
>
>
>
!