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Booting to a partitioned drive

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Anonymous
June 15, 2005 1:26:00 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win95.general.discussion (More info?)

When my desktop was originally configured, the hard drive was partitioned
into three partitions (C, D, and E). As I recall, this was done to get
around the 2 gig limitation of Windows 95.

Currently, the computer boots up to the D partition, where Windows 95
resides. If I want the computer to boot up to the C partition, for example,
where are these instructions located? (I am thinking of moving Windows 95
to the C partition.) I have checked the Autoexec.bat and Config.sys files
on my C partition, but I don't think that gives me the lead that I am
looking for.

Under the DOS setup, BIOS, the boot sequence is shown as A, C, SCSI.

Thanks for any thoughts!

Regards,

Gordon Biggar
Houston, Texas
Anonymous
June 15, 2005 1:27:51 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win95.general.discussion (More info?)

using FDISK, change the "active" partition.

"G.G. Biggar, Jr." <Colonel_Biggs@msn.com> wrote in message
news:o fr7EYbcFHA.616@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> When my desktop was originally configured, the hard drive was partitioned
> into three partitions (C, D, and E). As I recall, this was done to get
> around the 2 gig limitation of Windows 95.
>
> Currently, the computer boots up to the D partition, where Windows 95
> resides. If I want the computer to boot up to the C partition, for
> example,
> where are these instructions located? (I am thinking of moving Windows 95
> to the C partition.) I have checked the Autoexec.bat and Config.sys files
> on my C partition, but I don't think that gives me the lead that I am
> looking for.
>
> Under the DOS setup, BIOS, the boot sequence is shown as A, C, SCSI.
>
> Thanks for any thoughts!
>
> Regards,
>
> Gordon Biggar
> Houston, Texas
>
>
Anonymous
June 15, 2005 3:46:34 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win95.general.discussion (More info?)

It's in the "[Paths]" section of "c:\msdos.sys", but I don't think what you are
considering is feasible, since there are undoubtedly numerous references to
important files and folders on the "D:" drive in the existing registry.

Ben

"G.G. Biggar, Jr." <Colonel_Biggs@msn.com> wrote in message news:o fr7EYbcFHA.616@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> When my desktop was originally configured, the hard drive was partitioned
> into three partitions (C, D, and E). As I recall, this was done to get
> around the 2 gig limitation of Windows 95.
>
> Currently, the computer boots up to the D partition, where Windows 95
> resides. If I want the computer to boot up to the C partition, for example,
> where are these instructions located? (I am thinking of moving Windows 95
> to the C partition.) I have checked the Autoexec.bat and Config.sys files
> on my C partition, but I don't think that gives me the lead that I am
> looking for.
>
> Under the DOS setup, BIOS, the boot sequence is shown as A, C, SCSI.
>
> Thanks for any thoughts!
>
> Regards,
>
> Gordon Biggar
> Houston, Texas
>
>
Related resources
Anonymous
June 15, 2005 3:46:35 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win95.general.discussion (More info?)

I have another desktop that runs Windows 95, and where there is no
partitioning of the hard drive. The software/files on the two desktops are
almost identical, except for their location (i.e., C vs. D).

My thought is to format the C partition of the partitioned drive, and then
to dump a backup of the non-partitioned C drive from my other desktop onto
the formatted C drive of my partitioned drive. (I use BackupNow software
for backing up/restoring my hard drives.) The objective is to clean out
(eventually) all of the files in the D partition. These two desktops are
being used as backup machines in two different physical locations, and I
would like to have them pretty much identical.

If the registry from the non-partitioned drive is restored to the
partitioned drive (which will both be in C), I do not know if that could
cause a problem or not.

Gordon




"Ben Myers" <benjmyers@mindR-E-M-O-V-Espring.com> wrote in message
news:o oojhGccFHA.3620@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
It's in the "[Paths]" section of "c:\msdos.sys", but I don't think what you
are
considering is feasible, since there are undoubtedly numerous references to
important files and folders on the "D:" drive in the existing registry.

Ben

"G.G. Biggar, Jr." <Colonel_Biggs@msn.com> wrote in message
news:o fr7EYbcFHA.616@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> When my desktop was originally configured, the hard drive was partitioned
> into three partitions (C, D, and E). As I recall, this was done to get
> around the 2 gig limitation of Windows 95.
>
> Currently, the computer boots up to the D partition, where Windows 95
> resides. If I want the computer to boot up to the C partition, for
example,
> where are these instructions located? (I am thinking of moving Windows 95
> to the C partition.) I have checked the Autoexec.bat and Config.sys files
> on my C partition, but I don't think that gives me the lead that I am
> looking for.
>
> Under the DOS setup, BIOS, the boot sequence is shown as A, C, SCSI.
>
> Thanks for any thoughts!
>
> Regards,
>
> Gordon Biggar
> Houston, Texas
>
>
Anonymous
June 16, 2005 3:01:44 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win95.general.discussion (More info?)

Unless the two computers are identical, Windows may or may not be able
to reconfigure itself to the new hardware. As mentioned in another post,
use fdisk to make sure the C: partition is set as active.

Ben

"G.G. Biggar, Jr." <Colonel_Biggs@msn.com> wrote in message news:eTxlxkccFHA.228@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> I have another desktop that runs Windows 95, and where there is no
> partitioning of the hard drive. The software/files on the two desktops are
> almost identical, except for their location (i.e., C vs. D).
>
> My thought is to format the C partition of the partitioned drive, and then
> to dump a backup of the non-partitioned C drive from my other desktop onto
> the formatted C drive of my partitioned drive. (I use BackupNow software
> for backing up/restoring my hard drives.) The objective is to clean out
> (eventually) all of the files in the D partition. These two desktops are
> being used as backup machines in two different physical locations, and I
> would like to have them pretty much identical.
>
> If the registry from the non-partitioned drive is restored to the
> partitioned drive (which will both be in C), I do not know if that could
> cause a problem or not.
>
> Gordon
>
>
>
>
> "Ben Myers" <benjmyers@mindR-E-M-O-V-Espring.com> wrote in message
> news:o oojhGccFHA.3620@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> It's in the "[Paths]" section of "c:\msdos.sys", but I don't think what you
> are
> considering is feasible, since there are undoubtedly numerous references to
> important files and folders on the "D:" drive in the existing registry.
>
> Ben
>
> "G.G. Biggar, Jr." <Colonel_Biggs@msn.com> wrote in message
> news:o fr7EYbcFHA.616@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> > When my desktop was originally configured, the hard drive was partitioned
> > into three partitions (C, D, and E). As I recall, this was done to get
> > around the 2 gig limitation of Windows 95.
> >
> > Currently, the computer boots up to the D partition, where Windows 95
> > resides. If I want the computer to boot up to the C partition, for
> example,
> > where are these instructions located? (I am thinking of moving Windows 95
> > to the C partition.) I have checked the Autoexec.bat and Config.sys files
> > on my C partition, but I don't think that gives me the lead that I am
> > looking for.
> >
> > Under the DOS setup, BIOS, the boot sequence is shown as A, C, SCSI.
> >
> > Thanks for any thoughts!
> >
> > Regards,
> >
> > Gordon Biggar
> > Houston, Texas
> >
> >
>
>
Anonymous
June 17, 2005 1:30:37 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win95.general.discussion (More info?)

I gather that making the changes to msdos.sys (to have the computer boot to
the C partition) is not the same as having the C partition become the
"active" partition?

If my partitioned drive does accept the download into the C partition (on an
ongoing operating basis), my thought is to format the entire drive and start
from scratch. Will I have to use something like PartitionMagic in order to
eliminate all of the partitions except the C partition? My drive is a 4 gig
one, so I presume that 2 gig will be wasted space.

Can I presume that the sequence to follow will be: use FDISK to set the C
partition as active, format the C partition, and then download the C drive
contents from my other computer?

Thanks for your thoughts.

Gordon Biggar




"Ben Myers" <benjmyers@mindR-E-M-O-V-Espring.com> wrote in message
news:o zaBJSocFHA.2664@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
Unless the two computers are identical, Windows may or may not be able
to reconfigure itself to the new hardware. As mentioned in another post,
use fdisk to make sure the C: partition is set as active.

Ben

"G.G. Biggar, Jr." <Colonel_Biggs@msn.com> wrote in message
news:eTxlxkccFHA.228@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> I have another desktop that runs Windows 95, and where there is no
> partitioning of the hard drive. The software/files on the two desktops
are
> almost identical, except for their location (i.e., C vs. D).
>
> My thought is to format the C partition of the partitioned drive, and then
> to dump a backup of the non-partitioned C drive from my other desktop onto
> the formatted C drive of my partitioned drive. (I use BackupNow software
> for backing up/restoring my hard drives.) The objective is to clean out
> (eventually) all of the files in the D partition. These two desktops are
> being used as backup machines in two different physical locations, and I
> would like to have them pretty much identical.
>
> If the registry from the non-partitioned drive is restored to the
> partitioned drive (which will both be in C), I do not know if that could
> cause a problem or not.
>
> Gordon
>
>
>
>
> "Ben Myers" <benjmyers@mindR-E-M-O-V-Espring.com> wrote in message
> news:o oojhGccFHA.3620@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> It's in the "[Paths]" section of "c:\msdos.sys", but I don't think what
you
> are
> considering is feasible, since there are undoubtedly numerous references
to
> important files and folders on the "D:" drive in the existing registry.
>
> Ben
>
> "G.G. Biggar, Jr." <Colonel_Biggs@msn.com> wrote in message
> news:o fr7EYbcFHA.616@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> > When my desktop was originally configured, the hard drive was
partitioned
> > into three partitions (C, D, and E). As I recall, this was done to get
> > around the 2 gig limitation of Windows 95.
> >
> > Currently, the computer boots up to the D partition, where Windows 95
> > resides. If I want the computer to boot up to the C partition, for
> example,
> > where are these instructions located? (I am thinking of moving Windows
95
> > to the C partition.) I have checked the Autoexec.bat and Config.sys
files
> > on my C partition, but I don't think that gives me the lead that I am
> > looking for.
> >
> > Under the DOS setup, BIOS, the boot sequence is shown as A, C, SCSI.
> >
> > Thanks for any thoughts!
> >
> > Regards,
> >
> > Gordon Biggar
> > Houston, Texas
> >
> >
>
>
Anonymous
June 17, 2005 4:01:09 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win95.general.discussion (More info?)

"G.G. Biggar, Jr." <Colonel_Biggs@msn.com> wrote in message news:#gNx$j0cFHA.2212@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl..
> > I have another desktop that runs Windows 95, and where there is no
> > partitioning of the hard drive. The software/files on the two desktops
> are
> > almost identical, except for their location (i.e., C vs. D).
> >
> > My thought is to format the C partition of the partitioned drive, and then
> > to dump a backup of the non-partitioned C drive from my other desktop onto
> > the formatted C drive of my partitioned drive. (I use BackupNow software
> > for backing up/restoring my hard drives.) The objective is to clean out
> > (eventually) all of the files in the D partition. These two desktops are
> > being used as backup machines in two different physical locations, and I
> > would like to have them pretty much identical.

> "Ben Myers" <benjmyers@mindR-E-M-O-V-Espring.com> wrote in message
> news:o zaBJSocFHA.2664@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> Unless the two computers are identical, Windows may or may not be able
> to reconfigure itself to the new hardware. As mentioned in another post,
> use fdisk to make sure the C: partition is set as active.

"G.G. Biggar, Jr." <Colonel_Biggs@msn.com> wrote in message news:#gNx$j0cFHA.2212@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl..
> I gather that making the changes to msdos.sys (to have the computer boot to
> the C partition) is not the same as having the C partition become the
> "active" partition?

Correct, but the system you are transferring should already have a usable
"c:\msdos.sys".

> If my partitioned drive does accept the download into the C partition (on an
> ongoing operating basis), my thought is to format the entire drive and start
> from scratch.

Formatting a drive erases its contents. There is no reason to put any files
on a drive you are about to format.

> Will I have to use something like PartitionMagic in order to
> eliminate all of the partitions except the C partition?

A third party partitioning tool shouldn't be necessary unless you
intend to combine or resize partitions.

> My drive is a 4 gig
> one, so I presume that 2 gig will be wasted space.

If you are using Windows 95 OSR2 or later, you can create a
FAT32 partition. Even if you're not, you haven't given a reason
for not creating a second partition to use the remaining disk space.

> Can I presume that the sequence to follow will be: use FDISK to set the C
> partition as active,

Any partitioning tool, including fdisk can tell you which partition is active. If
the disk is already partitioned adequately, no changes are necessary.

> format the C partition,

Formatting is only necessary when the target drive is unformatted or is
formatted using a file system incompatible with the system being
installed or transferred.

> and then download the C drive
> contents from my other computer?

If you are using third party backup and restore software, it may
overwrite the entire target disk, making the existing partitions
irretrievable. Simply copying the files and directories will probably
be as effective as any other method. The real test will be seeing
if Windows can reconfigure itself to the new hardware.

Ben
Anonymous
June 17, 2005 5:13:36 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win95.general.discussion (More info?)

Many thanks for the inputs. Needless to say, I'm still learning. Should be
an interesting weekend. I'll report back.

Gordon


"G.G. Biggar, Jr." <Colonel_Biggs@msn.com> wrote in message
news:%23gNx$j0cFHA.2212@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> I gather that making the changes to msdos.sys (to have the computer boot
to
> the C partition) is not the same as having the C partition become the
> "active" partition?
>
> If my partitioned drive does accept the download into the C partition (on
an
> ongoing operating basis), my thought is to format the entire drive and
start
> from scratch. Will I have to use something like PartitionMagic in order
to
> eliminate all of the partitions except the C partition? My drive is a 4
gig
> one, so I presume that 2 gig will be wasted space.
>
> Can I presume that the sequence to follow will be: use FDISK to set the C
> partition as active, format the C partition, and then download the C drive
> contents from my other computer?
>
> Thanks for your thoughts.
>
> Gordon Biggar
>
>
>
>
> "Ben Myers" <benjmyers@mindR-E-M-O-V-Espring.com> wrote in message
> news:o zaBJSocFHA.2664@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> Unless the two computers are identical, Windows may or may not be able
> to reconfigure itself to the new hardware. As mentioned in another post,
> use fdisk to make sure the C: partition is set as active.
>
> Ben
>
> "G.G. Biggar, Jr." <Colonel_Biggs@msn.com> wrote in message
> news:eTxlxkccFHA.228@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> > I have another desktop that runs Windows 95, and where there is no
> > partitioning of the hard drive. The software/files on the two desktops
> are
> > almost identical, except for their location (i.e., C vs. D).
> >
> > My thought is to format the C partition of the partitioned drive, and
then
> > to dump a backup of the non-partitioned C drive from my other desktop
onto
> > the formatted C drive of my partitioned drive. (I use BackupNow
software
> > for backing up/restoring my hard drives.) The objective is to clean out
> > (eventually) all of the files in the D partition. These two desktops
are
> > being used as backup machines in two different physical locations, and I
> > would like to have them pretty much identical.
> >
> > If the registry from the non-partitioned drive is restored to the
> > partitioned drive (which will both be in C), I do not know if that could
> > cause a problem or not.
> >
> > Gordon
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > "Ben Myers" <benjmyers@mindR-E-M-O-V-Espring.com> wrote in message
> > news:o oojhGccFHA.3620@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> > It's in the "[Paths]" section of "c:\msdos.sys", but I don't think what
> you
> > are
> > considering is feasible, since there are undoubtedly numerous references
> to
> > important files and folders on the "D:" drive in the existing registry.
> >
> > Ben
> >
> > "G.G. Biggar, Jr." <Colonel_Biggs@msn.com> wrote in message
> > news:o fr7EYbcFHA.616@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> > > When my desktop was originally configured, the hard drive was
> partitioned
> > > into three partitions (C, D, and E). As I recall, this was done to
get
> > > around the 2 gig limitation of Windows 95.
> > >
> > > Currently, the computer boots up to the D partition, where Windows 95
> > > resides. If I want the computer to boot up to the C partition, for
> > example,
> > > where are these instructions located? (I am thinking of moving
Windows
> 95
> > > to the C partition.) I have checked the Autoexec.bat and Config.sys
> files
> > > on my C partition, but I don't think that gives me the lead that I am
> > > looking for.
> > >
> > > Under the DOS setup, BIOS, the boot sequence is shown as A, C, SCSI.
> > >
> > > Thanks for any thoughts!
> > >
> > > Regards,
> > >
> > > Gordon Biggar
> > > Houston, Texas
> > >
> > >
> >
> >
>
>
Anonymous
June 17, 2005 5:26:47 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win95.general.discussion (More info?)

"G.G. Biggar, Jr." <Colonel_Biggs@msn.com> wrote:

>I gather that making the changes to msdos.sys (to have the computer boot to
>the C partition) is not the same as having the C partition become the
>"active" partition?

No, definitely not. Making a partition active involves setting a flag
in the partition table in the disk's master boot record (IIRC). Only a
primary partition may be active, and only one primary may be active at
a time. FDISK can do this job, and of course a partitioning utility
like Partition Magic can do it.

>If my partitioned drive does accept the download into the C partition (on an
>ongoing operating basis), my thought is to format the entire drive and start
>from scratch. Will I have to use something like PartitionMagic in order to
>eliminate all of the partitions except the C partition? My drive is a 4 gig
>one, so I presume that 2 gig will be wasted space.

You can delete partitions with FDISK. But FDISK cannot use the space
made available by deleting the other partitions to make C bigger
(except by deleting C and recreating it, losing all data). Partition
Magic can incorporate the free space into C non-destructively.

>Can I presume that the sequence to follow will be: use FDISK to set the C
>partition as active, format the C partition, and then download the C drive
>contents from my other computer?

Sounds reasonable.

--
Tim Slattery
MS MVP(DTS)
Slattery_T@bls.gov
!