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CD-ROM Error with Windows 3.1 Install

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Anonymous
August 16, 2005 11:24:02 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win95.general.discussion (More info?)

Hi all. I know this is the Windows 95 forum but I couldn't find a forum for
Windows 3.1.

I'm having trouble installing Windows 3.1 on a computer that I have
installed Windows 98 on before without problems. Everytime I try to run the
Win 3.1 install I get an error that says the CD-ROM cannot be detected. The
CD-ROM is ok because the Win 98 install worked fine. My guess is that the the
Win 3.1 CD's drivers are not new enough to run the CD-ROM. I had the idea of
going to a used computer store and buying an old enough, generic CD-ROM and
installing it in the computer.

Does anyone have an easier option that doesn't require spending any money?
Thank you very much.

Jeremy

More about : rom error windows install

Anonymous
August 17, 2005 4:31:39 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win95.general.discussion (More info?)

"Jeremy B" <Jeremy B@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:EF8F93E7-9497-41D9-88EF-E768AFF0B5C7@microsoft.com...
> Hi all. I know this is the Windows 95 forum but I couldn't find a forum
for
> Windows 3.1.
>
> I'm having trouble installing Windows 3.1 on a computer that I have
> installed Windows 98 on before without problems. Everytime I try to run
the
> Win 3.1 install I get an error that says the CD-ROM cannot be detected.
The
> CD-ROM is ok because the Win 98 install worked fine. My guess is that the
the
> Win 3.1 CD's drivers are not new enough to run the CD-ROM. I had the idea
of
> going to a used computer store and buying an old enough, generic CD-ROM
and
> installing it in the computer.
>
> Does anyone have an easier option that doesn't require spending any money?
> Thank you very much.
>
This is actually a DOS question, not Windows 3.x or Windows 95. Please post
your config.sys and autoexec.bat files. You probably need a correct driver
([cddriver].sys file) for the cd rom drive.

You would probably be better off with a current drive with a current driver
file, since the old ones sometimes used proprietary interfaces, etc.
Anonymous
August 17, 2005 6:21:03 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win95.general.discussion (More info?)

Thank you for helping me Kay.

I looked through the floppy disk that is supposed to fire up the CD-ROM to
install the OS but didn't find an autoexec.bat or config.sys file. Instead I
found AUTOEXEC.DEM, AUTOEXEC.STD, CONFIG.DEM and CONFIG.STD. I opened them up
in notepad and posted the code below.

AUTOEXEC.DEM:

REM DO NOT EDIT THIS FILE IN ANYWAY!
REM This file must remain the way it currently is
REM in order for the RESTORE program to function properly.

@ECHO OFF
CLS
SET TMP=C:\
REM SET VVMODE=SGA_2E
SET EDITOR=TEXTEDIT
SET PROGX=
SET VVPAINT=TEMPRA
SET SOUND=C:\MM16P
PROMPT $P$G
PATH C:\WINDOWS;C:\DOS;C:\MSWORKS;C:\MSMONEY;C:\TEMPRA;C:\TEMPRA\AUD;
SET TEMP=C:\DOS
SET BLASTER=A220 I5 D1 T4
SET GALAXY=A220 I5 D1 K2 P330 T6

CD \DEMO
KEYBDIS
DEMO.BAT

----------------------------

AUTOEXEC.STD:

@ECHO OFF
PROMPT $P$G
PATH C:\DOS;C:\WINDOWS;C:\
C:\DOS\SMARTDRV.EXE 1024 256
LH C:\DOS\MSCDEX.EXE /D:MSCD0001 /M:30 /E
SET WINPMT=[WINDOWS] $P$G
SET TEMP=C:\PBTOOLS\WINTEMP
SET DIRCMD=/O
SET BLASTER=A220 I5 D1 T4
SET GALAXY=A220 I5 D1 K2 P330 T6
SET SOUND=C:\MMP16P
WIN/3
TYPE C:\PBFRONT\TEXT\EXIT.MSG

--------------------------------

CONFIG.DEM:

REM DO NOT EDIT THIS FILE IN ANYWAY!
REM This file must remain the way it currently is
REM in order for the RESTORE program to function properly.

DEVICE=C:\DOS\HIMEM.SYS
DEVICE=C:\DOS\EMM386.EXE RAM MIN=0 D=64
DOS=HIGH,UMB
DEVICEHIGH=C:\MMP16P\DRIVERS\SGCDU.SYS /D:MSCD0001
FILES=30
BUFFERS=20
STACKS=9,256
SHELL=C:\COMMAND.COM /E:1024 /P

--------------------------------------

CONFIG.STD:

DEVICE=C:\DOS\HIMEM.SYS
DOS=HIGH,UMB
DEVICE=C:\DOS\EMM386.EXE RAM MIN=0 D=64
FILES=30
BUFFERS=8
STACKS=9,256
FCBS=1,0
DEVICEHIGH=C:\WINDOWS\MOUSE.SYS
DEVICEHIGH=C:\MMP16P\DRIVERS\SGCDU.SYS /D:MSCD0001

---------------------------------

Is this what you were looking for? Thanks again.

Jeremy
Related resources
Anonymous
August 18, 2005 8:17:11 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win95.general.discussion (More info?)

Jeremy B wrote:
> Thank you for helping me Kay.
>
> I looked through the floppy disk that is supposed to fire up the CD-ROM to
> install the OS but didn't find an autoexec.bat or config.sys file. Instead I
> found AUTOEXEC.DEM, AUTOEXEC.STD, CONFIG.DEM and CONFIG.STD. I opened them up
> in notepad and posted the code below.
>
> AUTOEXEC.DEM:
>
> REM DO NOT EDIT THIS FILE IN ANYWAY!
> REM This file must remain the way it currently is
> REM in order for the RESTORE program to function properly.
>
> @ECHO OFF
> CLS
> SET TMP=C:\
> REM SET VVMODE=SGA_2E
> SET EDITOR=TEXTEDIT
> SET PROGX=
> SET VVPAINT=TEMPRA
> SET SOUND=C:\MM16P
> PROMPT $P$G
> PATH C:\WINDOWS;C:\DOS;C:\MSWORKS;C:\MSMONEY;C:\TEMPRA;C:\TEMPRA\AUD;
> SET TEMP=C:\DOS
> SET BLASTER=A220 I5 D1 T4
> SET GALAXY=A220 I5 D1 K2 P330 T6
>
> CD \DEMO
> KEYBDIS
> DEMO.BAT
>
> ----------------------------
>
> AUTOEXEC.STD:
>
> @ECHO OFF
> PROMPT $P$G
> PATH C:\DOS;C:\WINDOWS;C:\
> C:\DOS\SMARTDRV.EXE 1024 256
> LH C:\DOS\MSCDEX.EXE /D:MSCD0001 /M:30 /E
> SET WINPMT=[WINDOWS] $P$G
> SET TEMP=C:\PBTOOLS\WINTEMP
> SET DIRCMD=/O
> SET BLASTER=A220 I5 D1 T4
> SET GALAXY=A220 I5 D1 K2 P330 T6
> SET SOUND=C:\MMP16P
> WIN/3
> TYPE C:\PBFRONT\TEXT\EXIT.MSG
>
> --------------------------------
>
> CONFIG.DEM:
>
> REM DO NOT EDIT THIS FILE IN ANYWAY!
> REM This file must remain the way it currently is
> REM in order for the RESTORE program to function properly.
>
> DEVICE=C:\DOS\HIMEM.SYS
> DEVICE=C:\DOS\EMM386.EXE RAM MIN=0 D=64
> DOS=HIGH,UMB
> DEVICEHIGH=C:\MMP16P\DRIVERS\SGCDU.SYS /D:MSCD0001
> FILES=30
> BUFFERS=20
> STACKS=9,256
> SHELL=C:\COMMAND.COM /E:1024 /P
>
> --------------------------------------
>
> CONFIG.STD:
>
> DEVICE=C:\DOS\HIMEM.SYS
> DOS=HIGH,UMB
> DEVICE=C:\DOS\EMM386.EXE RAM MIN=0 D=64
> FILES=30
> BUFFERS=8
> STACKS=9,256
> FCBS=1,0
> DEVICEHIGH=C:\WINDOWS\MOUSE.SYS
> DEVICEHIGH=C:\MMP16P\DRIVERS\SGCDU.SYS /D:MSCD0001
>
> ---------------------------------
>
> Is this what you were looking for? Thanks again.
>
> Jeremy

The *.std versions contain commands for establishing CD-ROM operation
(the commands that include "SGCDU.SYS" and "MSCDEX.EXE"). Furthermore,
the autoexec.std contains a command that would run Windows. The two
files appear to be written for instalation on the hard drive so that
they will be executed while booting Windows from the hard drive.

What software is available when you get boot from the CD-ROM drive
instalation floppy? Idealy it should include an installer that should
establish CD-ROM capabilities on a hard drive containing DOS system
files or the Windows 95 versions of DOS's startup files.

Check http://bootdisk.com/bootdisk.htm for startup floppy images that
include support for many CD-ROM readers. These disks should give you the
ability to run the installation software on the Windows distribution CD.
If they aren't compatable with the CD-ROM drive you own you can use the
floppy that came with your reader to obtain the SGCDU.SYS file and
generate a startup floppy substituting that file for the driver on the
bootdisk.com image (may need to change that "DEVICEHIGH...D:MSCD0001"
line to reflect the different file name).

See "HOW TO MAKE A BOOTDISK FOR YOUR PC" at
http://bootdisk.com/readme.htm#cdromdos.
Anonymous
August 18, 2005 8:11:36 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win95.general.discussion (More info?)

On Tue, 16 Aug 2005 19:24:02 -0700, "Jeremy B" <Jeremy

>Hi all. I know this is the Windows 95 forum but I couldn't find a forum for
>Windows 3.1.

>I'm having trouble installing Windows 3.1 on a computer that I have
>installed Windows 98 on before without problems. Everytime I try to run the
>Win 3.1 install I get an error that says the CD-ROM cannot be detected. The
>CD-ROM is ok because the Win 98 install worked fine. My guess is that the the
>Win 3.1 CD's drivers are not new enough to run the CD-ROM.

Yep. Unlike Win9x, Win3.yuk really does run on top of DOS, though it
takes over some memory management etc. but it still relies on DOS for
CD-ROM support. You can use the Win98 OakCDROM.sys driver (from the
Windows\Command\EBD folder) to drive the CD, as follows...

In C:\CONFIG.SYS ...

DeviceHigh=C:\Path\To\OakCDROM.sys /D:CD1

In C:\AUTOEXEC.BAT ...

LH MSCDEx /D:CD1

These drivers extend BIOS and DOS, respectively, to support the CD-ROM
drive, and Windows 3.1 inherits that when it runs.

BTW: The DOS that Win3.yuk runs on has to be MS-DOS 5 through 6.22;
you can't install and run Windows 3.xx on the DOS mode from a Win9x.

>...buying an old enough, generic CD-ROM and installing it in the computer.

That's a CWOT. Win3.yuk never did figure out what a CD-ROM was, no
matter how old a CD-ROM drive you throw at it :-)

>Does anyone have an easier option that doesn't require spending any money?

Yep...



>------------------------ ---- --- -- - - - -
Forget http://cquirke.blogspot.com and check out a
better one at http://topicdrift.blogspot.com instead!
>------------------------ ---- --- -- - - - -
Anonymous
August 19, 2005 2:39:02 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win95.general.discussion (More info?)

"cquirke (MVP Windows shell/user)" wrote:
> Yep. Unlike Win9x, Win3.yuk really does run on top of DOS, though it
> takes over some memory management etc. but it still relies on DOS for
> CD-ROM support. You can use the Win98 OakCDROM.sys driver (from the
> Windows\Command\EBD folder) to drive the CD, as follows...
>
> In C:\CONFIG.SYS ...
>
> DeviceHigh=C:\Path\To\OakCDROM.sys /D:CD1
>
> In C:\AUTOEXEC.BAT ...
>
> LH MSCDEx /D:CD1
>
> These drivers extend BIOS and DOS, respectively, to support the CD-ROM
> drive, and Windows 3.1 inherits that when it runs.
>
> BTW: The DOS that Win3.yuk runs on has to be MS-DOS 5 through 6.22;
> you can't install and run Windows 3.xx on the DOS mode from a Win9x.
>

Ok thanks for the info. I'm confused about a few things though.

1. For getting the oakcdrom.sys driver, where is the "Windows\Command\EBD
folder?" I went to C:\WINDOWS\COMMAND on my Windows 98SE system and couldn't
find the EBD folder. However, on my Win98SE book disk I found a file named
oakcdrom.sys. Will this one work?

2. In the part where you tell me what files to alter you wrote "In
C:\CONFIG.SYS ..." and "In C:\AUTOEXEC.BAT ..." But their are no files on the
C: drive yet. Could you explain that more?

3. Also, I don't actually have a config.sys or a autoexec.bat file anywhere.
The only files that come close are the AUTOEXEC.DEM, AUTOEXEC.STD, CONFIG.DEM
and CONFIG.STD files that are on the floppy disk that fires up the CD-ROM. I
have the code from those files posted in my 2nd post above and those files do
contain code similar to what you wrote in your post (eg
"DeviceHigh=C:\Path\To\OakCDROM.sys /D:CD1"). Should I just relpace the code
in those files on the Win 3.1 disk with your code?

4. I noticed that for the autoexec.bat file you said I should change the
code to "LH MSCDEx /D:CD1." Are you sure that your code is correct? Looking
at the code in the AUTOEXEC.STD file posted above there's a line that reads
"LH C:\DOS\MSCDEX.EXE /D:MSCD0001 /M:30 /E." Are you sure that your code
shouldn't read something more like that?

Thanks you very much for your help.

Jeremy
Anonymous
August 19, 2005 2:38:55 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win95.general.discussion (More info?)

Jeremy B wrote:
> "cquirke (MVP Windows shell/user)" wrote:
>
>>Yep. Unlike Win9x, Win3.yuk really does run on top of DOS, though it
>>takes over some memory management etc. but it still relies on DOS for
>>CD-ROM support. You can use the Win98 OakCDROM.sys driver (from the
>>Windows\Command\EBD folder) to drive the CD, as follows...
>>
>>In C:\CONFIG.SYS ...
>>
>>DeviceHigh=C:\Path\To\OakCDROM.sys /D:CD1
>>
>>In C:\AUTOEXEC.BAT ...
>>
>>LH MSCDEx /D:CD1
>>
>>These drivers extend BIOS and DOS, respectively, to support the CD-ROM
>>drive, and Windows 3.1 inherits that when it runs.
>>
>>BTW: The DOS that Win3.yuk runs on has to be MS-DOS 5 through 6.22;
>>you can't install and run Windows 3.xx on the DOS mode from a Win9x.
>>
>
>
> Ok thanks for the info. I'm confused about a few things though.
>
> 1. For getting the oakcdrom.sys driver, where is the "Windows\Command\EBD
> folder?" I went to C:\WINDOWS\COMMAND on my Windows 98SE system and couldn't
> find the EBD folder. However, on my Win98SE book disk I found a file named
> oakcdrom.sys. Will this one work?
>
> 2. In the part where you tell me what files to alter you wrote "In
> C:\CONFIG.SYS ..." and "In C:\AUTOEXEC.BAT ..." But their are no files on the
> C: drive yet. Could you explain that more?
>
> 3. Also, I don't actually have a config.sys or a autoexec.bat file anywhere.
> The only files that come close are the AUTOEXEC.DEM, AUTOEXEC.STD, CONFIG.DEM
> and CONFIG.STD files that are on the floppy disk that fires up the CD-ROM. I
> have the code from those files posted in my 2nd post above and those files do
> contain code similar to what you wrote in your post (eg
> "DeviceHigh=C:\Path\To\OakCDROM.sys /D:CD1"). Should I just relpace the code
> in those files on the Win 3.1 disk with your code?
>
> 4. I noticed that for the autoexec.bat file you said I should change the
> code to "LH MSCDEx /D:CD1." Are you sure that your code is correct? Looking
> at the code in the AUTOEXEC.STD file posted above there's a line that reads
> "LH C:\DOS\MSCDEX.EXE /D:MSCD0001 /M:30 /E." Are you sure that your code
> shouldn't read something more like that?
>
> Thanks you very much for your help.
>
> Jeremy

Since you will be loading Windows in the equivlent of "DOS Mode" you
WILL need to load drivers to access the instalation files on removable
optical media like a Cd-ROM. These drivers are contained in a *.sys file
AND mscdex.exe. Many CD and DVD drives can be operated READ ONLY with
oakcdrom.sys, but a few might need a *.sys file from the drive
manufacturer. The *.sys file needs to be loaded by config.sys. the
mscdex.exe needs to be run by autoexec.bat.

Let's break down the commands related to the CD-ROM drive:

In config.sys "DEVICEHIGH" loads a device driver. The driver in the high
Intel 80286 compatable high memory area if this area has already been
enabled by other config.sys commands AND not already occupied by the
operating system or previously loaded drivers. The driver will load to
the lower address "conventional memory" if space in the high memory area
isn't available.

The "C:\PATH\TO\" portion describes the path where "OakCDROM.SYS" is
located. The example is just a made up folder/directory path. You might
prefer putting OakCDROM.SYS in a direcory named "drivers", but the
folder name isn't important as long as it describes the path you copied
the OakCDROM.SYS file to.

"OakCDROM.SYS" is, of course the name of the driver file.

The "/D:CD1" gives the drive a name so that the MSCDEX.EXE command knows
which one to attach to.

In autoexec.bat "LoadHigh" or the shorter "LH" loads a file into the
Intel 80286 compatable high memory if free and made available by the
HIMEM.SYS line, to conventional memory if high memory space is not
available.

Then you have the file path and file name for the MS CD-ROM Extension.
Again the actual path isn't important as long as it actually describes
where you have copied the mscdex.exe file to.

The "/D:MSCD001" is the reference to the device to use the extensions
with. The portion after the colon should match the device reference used
when you loaded the *.sys file. Note that "/D:CD1" in config.sys WITH
"/D:MSCD001" in autoexec would NOT work, the parts after the colon MUST
be identical.

The "/M:30" portion sets the quantity of file buffers available for the
CD drive.

While the on disk help lists the "/E' portion, it doesn't indicate its
function. Doesn't list what "/K" "/S" or "/V" stand for either. For some
other commands "/V" generates a "verbose" more detailed description of
what the command is doing during the boot sequence.

If you add " /L:R" you can override the default assignment of the CD-ROM
to the next available letter after the hard drive partition(s). By
assigning a higher letter you can avoid the tendancy of CD useing
applications to malfunction after the addition of a second hard drive.
Establishing this high drive letter early allows it to remain unchanged.
!