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Moving User Directory from SSD to HDD

Last response: in Windows 7
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March 23, 2011 4:10:40 AM

I recently purchased my PC components which include a Corsair 60GB Force Series SSD to use as a boot and application drive. In order to maximize the free space on the SSD I want to move the User Directory from the SSD to the HDD. After looking into this I have found numerous articles which suggest numerous ways to accomplish this. Nearly all of them have people saying that it may cause this or that to go wrong. So what options do I really have? Which method is best (on the list, or found elsewhere)? Is it even worth it (i.e. how much space does the user directory really use)?

http://www.overclock.net/ssd/664738-how-setup-ssd-boot-drive-secondary.html
http://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/windows_7-files/win7-how-do-i-move-user-folder-to-a-different/565f16a5-e5ed-43c9-8422-4f56aebb296e
http://www.vistax64.com/vista-file-management/171050-move-users-directory-another-drive.html
http://lifehacker.com/#!5467758/move-the-users-directory-in-windows-7
a b $ Windows 7
March 23, 2011 5:14:28 AM

just go to your Library folder, right click on any of the folders in it, and then select properties.
You'll be able to direct to which ever drive you want to store your My Documents, Music, Video, Photo, ect.
That's all you really need to do. I have my Library folders on a server, to maximize the SSD's space.
Also, turn off Hibernation. not needed, and takes up allot of space.
March 23, 2011 6:07:30 AM

I want to move the actual "users" folder entirely over so it includes things like temporary internet folder, outlook folder, ect. I want to eliminate as much fluctuation as possible in the drive so that it is a predictable size when I deciding what I actually have room to install on it.
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a b $ Windows 7
March 23, 2011 7:45:10 AM

or get 2 :D 

Best solution

a b $ Windows 7
March 23, 2011 7:33:02 PM
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JamesAllen said:
I want to move the actual "users" folder entirely over so it includes things like temporary internet folder, outlook folder, ect. I want to eliminate as much fluctuation as possible in the drive so that it is a predictable size when I deciding what I actually have room to install on it.


You bought a ssd to use, so use it. Don't bother trying to micromanage space. Just monitor it for a while, then decide what, if anything should be moved off. It is the ssd performance of accesses to many small files that give you the snappiness you paid for.

a b $ Windows 7
March 23, 2011 7:35:48 PM

+1 geofelt
a b $ Windows 7
April 1, 2011 8:03:57 PM

geofelt said:
You bought a ssd to use, so use it. Don't bother trying to micromanage space. Just monitor it for a while, then decide what, if anything should be moved off. It is the ssd performance of accesses to many small files that give you the snappiness you paid for.

90 percent agree. However, one of the odder things that I do (with computers, that is) is that my OS disk is subject to restore from an earlier version at any time. If I get a virus, go to the last backup. If an installation fails, ditto. I've fallen back as far as six months, happily except for some of the data in the Application Data part of the Users tree. Moving the whole shebang to my data drive would protect all that Application Data stuff, too, and some of it is massive. And my precious bookmarks and browser history (yes, I am kidding).

Of course, moving the whole thing sort of undermines my intact OS restore if the User parts of the registry are moved to my data disk too.

I spend a lot more time ensuring that I don't lose data from my data drive than from my OS drive. OS screwed up? Restore! I restore it for fun on weekends. (not really).

This post is more discussing way-out other reasons for other choices rather than meaning that the OP should consider this approach.
April 2, 2011 8:01:48 PM

Best answer selected by JamesAllen.
!