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Laser Printed Pages Now Can Track You 'Like A License Plate'

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  • Peripherals
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Anonymous
November 23, 2004 12:24:05 AM

Archived from groups: misc.consumers,comp.periphs.printers,alt.folklore.urban,alt.politics.libertarian (More info?)

PC World / Mon Nov 22, 2004
Government Uses Color Laser Printer Technology to Track Documents
Jason Tuohey, Medill News Service

WASHINGTON--Next time you make a printout from your color laser
printer, shine an LED flashlight beam on it and examine it closely
with a magnifying glass. You might be able to see the small, scattered
yellow dots printer there that could be used to trace the document
back to you.

According to experts, several printer companies quietly encode the
serial number and the manufacturing code of their color laser printers
and color copiers on every document those machines produce.
Governments, including the United States, already use the hidden
markings to track counterfeiters.

Peter Crean, a senior research fellow at Xerox, says his company's
laser printers, copiers and multifunction workstations, such as its
WorkCentre Pro series, put the "serial number of each machine coded in
little yellow dots" in every printout. The millimeter-sized dots
appear about every inch on a page, nestled within the printed words
and margins.

"It's a trail back to you, like a license plate," Crean says.

The dots' minuscule size, covering less than one-thousandth of the
page, along with their color combination of yellow on white, makes
them invisible to the naked eye, Crean says. One way to determine if
your color laser is applying this tracking process is to shine a blue
LED light--say, from a keychain laser flashlight--on your page and use
a magnifier.

Crime Fighting vs. Privacy

Laser-printing technology makes it incredibly easy to counterfeit
money and documents, and Crean says the dots, in use in some printers
for decades, allow law enforcement to identify and track down
counterfeiters.

However, they could also be employed to track a document back to any
person or business that printed it. Although the technology has
existed for a long time, printer companies have not been required to
notify customers of the feature.

Lorelei Pagano, a counterfeiting specialist with the U.S. Secret
Service, stresses that the government uses the embedded serial numbers
only when alerted to a forgery. "The only time any information is
gained from these documents is purely in [the case of] a criminal
act," she says.

John Morris, a lawyer for The Center for Democracy and Technology,
says, "That type of assurance doesn't really assure me at all, unless
there's some type of statute." He adds, "At a bare minimum, there
needs to be a notice to consumers."

If the practice disturbs you, don't bother trying to disable the
encoding mechanism--you'll probably just break your printer.

Crean describes the device as a chip located "way in the machine,
right near the laser" that embeds the dots when the document "is about
20 billionths of a second" from printing.

"Standard mischief won't get you around it," Crean adds.

Neither Crean nor Pagano has an estimate of how many laser printers,
copiers, and multifunction devices track documents, but they say that
the practice is commonplace among major printer companies.

"The industry absolutely has been extraordinarily helpful [to law
enforcement]," Pagano says.

According to Pagano, counterfeiting cases are brought to the Secret
Service, which checks the documents, determines the brand and serial
number of the printer, and contacts the company. Some, like Xerox,
have a customer database, and they share the information with the
government.

Crean says Xerox and the government have a good relationship. "The
U.S. government had been on board all along--they would actually come
out to our labs," Crean says.

History

Unlike ink jet printers, laser printers, fax machines, and copiers
fire a laser through a mirror and series of lenses to embed the
document or image on a page. Such devices range from a little over
$100 to more than $1000, and are designed for both home and office.

Crean says Xerox pioneered this technology about 20 years ago, to
assuage fears that their color copiers could easily be used to
counterfeit bills.

"We developed the first (encoding mechanism) in house because several
countries had expressed concern about allowing us to sell the printers
in their country," Crean says.

Since then, he says, many other companies have adopted the practice.

The United States is not the only country teaming with private
industry to fight counterfeiters. A recent article points to the Dutch
government as using similar anticounterfeiting methods, and cites
Canon as a company with encoding technology. Canon USA declined to
comment.

More about : laser printed pages track license plate

Anonymous
November 23, 2004 9:15:58 AM

Archived from groups: misc.consumers,comp.periphs.printers,alt.folklore.urban,alt.politics.libertarian (More info?)

MrPepper11@go.com (MrPepper11) wrote:

>However, they could also be employed to track a document back to any
>person or business that printed it.

<adds note to Master Criminal File: Do not register printer when
purchased, or purchase used printer under false name via eBay, or
puchase printer with cash from a small computer store at least 300
kilometers from the Lair.>

D.
--
Touch-twice life. Eat. Drink. Laugh.

-Resolved: To be more temperate in my postings.
Oct 5th, 2004 JDL
November 23, 2004 10:12:58 AM

Archived from groups: misc.consumers,comp.periphs.printers,alt.folklore.urban,alt.politics.libertarian (More info?)

"Derek Lyons" <fairwater@gmail.com> wrote in message
> <adds note to Master Criminal File: Do not register printer when
> purchased, or purchase used printer under false name via eBay, or
> puchase printer with cash from a small computer store at least 300
> kilometers from the Lair.>

also don't pay with a credit card, as that would allow them to track you
down.

I'm surprised that the printer companies don't disclose that they do this in
the user manual.
Anonymous
November 23, 2004 11:07:42 AM

Archived from groups: misc.consumers,comp.periphs.printers,alt.folklore.urban (More info?)

DC wrote, in <_pBod.25546$6q2.12792@newssvr14.news.prodigy.com>:

> "Derek Lyons" <fairwater@gmail.com> wrote in message
> > <adds note to Master Criminal File: Do not register printer when
> > purchased, or purchase used printer under false name via eBay, or
> > puchase printer with cash from a small computer store at least 300
> > kilometers from the Lair.>
>
> also don't pay with a credit card, as that would allow them to track you
> down.
>
> I'm surprised that the printer companies don't disclose that they do this in
> the user manual.

Or advertise it as a feature to prevent others attempting to pass off
documents claiming to come from you.
--
Nick Spalding
Anonymous
November 23, 2004 2:05:53 PM

Archived from groups: misc.consumers,comp.periphs.printers,alt.folklore.urban,alt.politics.libertarian (More info?)

"MrPepper11" <MrPepper11@go.com> schreef in bericht
news:57cfd534.0411222124.eaf785@posting.google.com...
> PC World / Mon Nov 22, 2004
> Government Uses Color Laser Printer Technology to Track Documents
> Jason Tuohey, Medill News Service
>
> WASHINGTON--Next time you make a printout from your color laser
> printer, shine an LED flashlight beam on it and examine it closely
> with a magnifying glass. You might be able to see the small, scattered
> yellow dots printer there that could be used to trace the document
> back to you.
>


They are doing this for quite a while now (at least 3 years that I know of).
I realy don't think it helps one bit with the "real" counterfitters.
I know the qms/ konika-minolta printers have this dot overlay embedded in
the engine serial/counter eeprom and i'm quite sure other manufacturers use
the same method.
I also know you can rewrite this eeprom (if you know how to correct the
checksums etc.).
So how to trace a phony bill with a unregistered dot overlay to a serial
number.


Jeff
Anonymous
November 23, 2004 4:19:52 PM

Archived from groups: misc.consumers,comp.periphs.printers,alt.folklore.urban,alt.politics.libertarian (More info?)

In article <41a30b7e$0$76527$b83b6cc0@news.wanadoo.nl>,
"FutureChild" <future|dot|child|at|wanadoo|dot|nl> wrote:

> So how to trace a phony bill with a unregistered dot overlay to a serial
> number.

Within law enforcement, it's probably viewed more as prosecutorial
forensic evidence than as a "tracking" tool (unless the counterfeiter is
one of those really dumb ones).
Anonymous
November 23, 2004 5:46:25 PM

Archived from groups: misc.consumers,comp.periphs.printers,alt.folklore.urban,alt.politics.libertarian (More info?)

<bearclaw@cruller.invalid> schreef in bericht
news:bearclaw-A59B98.05195023112004@newsclstr01.news.prodigy.com...
> In article <41a30b7e$0$76527$b83b6cc0@news.wanadoo.nl>,
> "FutureChild" <future|dot|child|at|wanadoo|dot|nl> wrote:
>
>> So how to trace a phony bill with a unregistered dot overlay to a serial
>> number.
>
> Within law enforcement, it's probably viewed more as prosecutorial
> forensic evidence than as a "tracking" tool (unless the counterfeiter is
> one of those really dumb ones).

It has everything to do with today's machinery getting better and better.
without obstacles in programs like photoshop and overlay's in printers we'd
all be printing phony bills in our basement
It is indeed made for joe public counterfeitting in his basement
office...... the smarter ones actualy use more sophisticated machinery than
a laserprinter.
or so I can imagine......;-)
November 23, 2004 6:48:34 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

FutureChild wrote:

>It has everything to do with today's machinery getting better and better.
>without obstacles in programs like photoshop and overlay's in printers we'd
>all be printing phony bills in our basement

I don't think so...

Patches for programs like Photoshop are readily available on the net to
edit scanned images of money. And I've yet to come across a typical
printer that will refuse to print a bill.

I could scan a $20 bill and print out a reasonably good copy in a
heartbeat. But very few people would accept it at any store...it just
wouldn't have the right feel to it.

>It is indeed made for joe public counterfeitting in his basement
>office...... the smarter ones actualy use more sophisticated machinery than
>a laserprinter.

Using a laser printer and regular paper is what the dumb criminals do,
and they get caught the same day they try to pass it off.

No one who is really into counterfeiting uses Photoshop, a home computer
or printer, or anything like them. You need the proper equipment to do
even a reasonably good job, so your average joe wouldn't even bother
trying...unless he's a DUMB average joe.
:) 
Anonymous
November 23, 2004 11:55:34 PM

Archived from groups: misc.consumers,comp.periphs.printers,alt.folklore.urban,alt.politics.libertarian (More info?)

bearclaw@cruller.invalid wrote:

> In article <41a30b7e$0$76527$b83b6cc0@news.wanadoo.nl>,
> "FutureChild" <future|dot|child|at|wanadoo|dot|nl> wrote:
>
>
>>So how to trace a phony bill with a unregistered dot overlay to a serial
>>number.
>
>
> Within law enforcement, it's probably viewed more as prosecutorial
> forensic evidence than as a "tracking" tool (unless the counterfeiter is
> one of those really dumb ones).

It's not something that can be casually decoded. In the US, the US
Secret Service is, by aggreement with the manufacturers, the only agency
that holds the codes. Only one agency per country.

--
Gerald Clough
"Nothing has any value, unless you know you can give it up."
Anonymous
November 24, 2004 1:51:02 AM

Archived from groups: misc.consumers,comp.periphs.printers,alt.folklore.urban,alt.politics.libertarian (More info?)

In article <41abd53e.4257029@supernews.seanet.com>,
fairwater@gmail.com (Derek Lyons) wrote:

> MrPepper11@go.com (MrPepper11) wrote:
>
> >However, they could also be employed to track a document back to any
> >person or business that printed it.
>
> <adds note to Master Criminal File: Do not register printer when
> purchased, or purchase used printer under false name via eBay, or
> puchase printer with cash from a small computer store at least 300
> kilometers from the Lair.>

Better yet, learn how to hack the printer so that it prints no serial
number, or an altered serial number.

Has this claim been validated from a reliable source, or are we
relying on lore?
Anonymous
November 24, 2004 1:51:58 AM

Archived from groups: misc.consumers,comp.periphs.printers,alt.folklore.urban,alt.politics.libertarian (More info?)

In article <_pBod.25546$6q2.12792@newssvr14.news.prodigy.com>,
"DC" <noreply@fakeaddress.com> wrote:

> "Derek Lyons" <fairwater@gmail.com> wrote in message
> > <adds note to Master Criminal File: Do not register printer when
> > purchased, or purchase used printer under false name via eBay, or
> > puchase printer with cash from a small computer store at least 300
> > kilometers from the Lair.>
>
> also don't pay with a credit card, as that would allow them to track you
> down.
>
> I'm surprised that the printer companies don't disclose that they do this in
> the user manual.

Hey, if you were a Master Criminal, would you BUY the printer?
Anonymous
November 24, 2004 4:45:22 AM

Archived from groups: misc.consumers,comp.periphs.printers,alt.folklore.urban,alt.politics.libertarian (More info?)

MrPepper11 wrote:
> PC World / Mon Nov 22, 2004
> Government Uses Color Laser Printer Technology to Track Documents
> Jason Tuohey, Medill News Service

So, how does this help nail the asshats at CBS with the forged
documents from just before the election?

technomaNge

--
You can't build a reputation based on what you're *gonna* do!
November 24, 2004 4:45:23 AM

Archived from groups: misc.consumers,comp.periphs.printers,alt.folklore.urban,alt.politics.libertarian (More info?)

technomaNge <piracy@microsoft.com> wrote in message news:<SIRod.452874$D%.404881@attbi_s51>...
> MrPepper11 wrote:
> > PC World / Mon Nov 22, 2004
> > Government Uses Color Laser Printer Technology to Track Documents
> > Jason Tuohey, Medill News Service
>
> So, how does this help nail the asshats at CBS with the forged
> documents from just before the election?

Since CBS had nth-generation degraded photocopies of faxes of whatever, it doesn't.
Anonymous
November 24, 2004 6:11:12 AM

Archived from groups: misc.consumers,comp.periphs.printers,alt.folklore.urban,alt.politics.libertarian (More info?)

In article <k82dnSODwZy9ZT7cRVn-oQ@texas.net>, firstinitiallastname@texas.net (Gerald Clough) writes:
| bearclaw@cruller.invalid wrote:
|
| > In article <41a30b7e$0$76527$b83b6cc0@news.wanadoo.nl>,
| > "FutureChild" <future|dot|child|at|wanadoo|dot|nl> wrote:
| >
| >
| >>So how to trace a phony bill with a unregistered dot overlay to a serial
| >>number.
| >
| >
| > Within law enforcement, it's probably viewed more as prosecutorial
| > forensic evidence than as a "tracking" tool (unless the counterfeiter is
| > one of those really dumb ones).
|
| It's not something that can be casually decoded. In the US, the US
| Secret Service is, by aggreement with the manufacturers, the only agency
| that holds the codes. Only one agency per country.

But do you need to decode it if you merely want to show that two samples
came from the same printer? That is, is the pattern used by a given printer
constant for all pages that it prints or does each page include a time-varying
confounder of some sort?

Dan Lanciani
ddl@danlan.*com
Anonymous
November 24, 2004 8:54:14 AM

Archived from groups: misc.consumers,comp.periphs.printers,alt.folklore.urban,alt.politics.libertarian (More info?)

In article <k82dnSODwZy9ZT7cRVn-oQ@texas.net>,
Gerald Clough <firstinitiallastname@texas.net> wrote:

> bearclaw@cruller.invalid wrote:
>
> > In article <41a30b7e$0$76527$b83b6cc0@news.wanadoo.nl>,
> > "FutureChild" <future|dot|child|at|wanadoo|dot|nl> wrote:
> >
> >
> >>So how to trace a phony bill with a unregistered dot overlay to a serial
> >>number.
> >
> >
> > Within law enforcement, it's probably viewed more as prosecutorial
> > forensic evidence than as a "tracking" tool (unless the counterfeiter is
> > one of those really dumb ones).
>
> It's not something that can be casually decoded. In the US, the US
> Secret Service is, by aggreement with the manufacturers, the only agency
> that holds the codes. Only one agency per country.

Still, there's no court order involved, right? So if another agency
needed the info to nail a suspect on whatever charge, they could easily
ask the Secret Service to run it down for them.
Anonymous
November 24, 2004 8:13:08 PM

Archived from groups: misc.consumers,comp.periphs.printers,alt.folklore.urban,alt.politics.libertarian (More info?)

On 2004-11-23 20:45:22 -0500, technomaNge <piracy@microsoft.com> said:

> MrPepper11 wrote:
>> PC World / Mon Nov 22, 2004
>> Government Uses Color Laser Printer Technology to Track Documents
>> Jason Tuohey, Medill News Service
>
> So, how does this help nail the asshats at CBS with the forged
> documents from just before the election?
>
> technomaNge
November 24, 2004 9:52:27 PM

Archived from groups: misc.consumers,comp.periphs.printers,alt.folklore.urban,alt.politics.libertarian (More info?)

On Tue, 23 Nov 2004 22:51:58 -0600, Hugh Gibbons <party@my.house.com> wrote:


>> I'm surprised that the printer companies don't disclose that they do this in
>> the user manual.
>
>Hey, if you were a Master Criminal, would you BUY the printer?
>

Any petty criminal would break into some office and steal the printer and a few
other things; the master criminal would hijack a truckload of printers.
Anonymous
November 24, 2004 10:38:35 PM

Archived from groups: misc.consumers,comp.periphs.printers,alt.folklore.urban,alt.politics.libertarian (More info?)

Dan Lanciani wrote:

> In article <k82dnSODwZy9ZT7cRVn-oQ@texas.net>, firstinitiallastname@texas.net (Gerald Clough) writes:
> | bearclaw@cruller.invalid wrote:
> |
> | > In article <41a30b7e$0$76527$b83b6cc0@news.wanadoo.nl>,
> | > "FutureChild" <future|dot|child|at|wanadoo|dot|nl> wrote:
> | >
> | >
> | >>So how to trace a phony bill with a unregistered dot overlay to a serial
> | >>number.
> | >
> | >
> | > Within law enforcement, it's probably viewed more as prosecutorial
> | > forensic evidence than as a "tracking" tool (unless the counterfeiter is
> | > one of those really dumb ones).
> |
> | It's not something that can be casually decoded. In the US, the US
> | Secret Service is, by aggreement with the manufacturers, the only agency
> | that holds the codes. Only one agency per country.
>
> But do you need to decode it if you merely want to show that two samples
> came from the same printer? That is, is the pattern used by a given printer
> constant for all pages that it prints or does each page include a time-varying
> confounder of some sort?

I suppose you could. My understanding, from the USSS forensics guy, is
that it codes the make and serial number (model too, I guess) in a
pattern of yellow dots.

--
Gerald Clough
"Nothing has any value, unless you know you can give it up."
Anonymous
November 25, 2004 7:10:46 AM

Archived from groups: misc.consumers,comp.periphs.printers,alt.folklore.urban,alt.politics.libertarian (More info?)

On or about 22 Nov 2004 21:24:05 -0800, MrPepper11@go.com (MrPepper11)
wrote something like:

>PC World / Mon Nov 22, 2004
>Government Uses Color Laser Printer Technology to Track Documents
>Jason Tuohey, Medill News Service
>
>WASHINGTON--Next time you make a printout from your color laser
>printer, shine an LED flashlight beam on it and examine it closely
>with a magnifying glass. You might be able to see the small, scattered
>yellow dots printer there that could be used to trace the document
>back to you.
<>
Mygawd, all my big bills must be counterfeit, because they have those
same seemingly random paterns of yellow marks all over the back!
Should I tell the Secret Service?
"twentys and fiftys and hundreds, oh my"
--
Crashj
November 25, 2004 1:19:23 PM

Archived from groups: misc.consumers,comp.periphs.printers,alt.folklore.urban,alt.politics.libertarian (More info?)

On Thu, 25 Nov 2004 04:10:46 GMT, Crashj <leader001-notread@mindspring.com>
wrote:


>Mygawd, all my big bills must be counterfeit, because they have those
>same seemingly random paterns of yellow marks all over the back!
>Should I tell the Secret Service?
>"twentys and fiftys and hundreds, oh my"

Burn the lot, NOW!
Anonymous
November 25, 2004 8:35:26 PM

Archived from groups: misc.consumers,comp.periphs.printers,alt.folklore.urban,alt.politics.libertarian (More info?)

Crashj proclaimed:

> On or about 22 Nov 2004 21:24:05 -0800, MrPepper11@go.com (MrPepper11)
> wrote something like:
>
>
>>PC World / Mon Nov 22, 2004
>>Government Uses Color Laser Printer Technology to Track Documents
>>Jason Tuohey, Medill News Service
>>
>>WASHINGTON--Next time you make a printout from your color laser
>>printer, shine an LED flashlight beam on it and examine it closely
>>with a magnifying glass. You might be able to see the small, scattered
>>yellow dots printer there that could be used to trace the document
>>back to you.
>
> <>
> Mygawd, all my big bills must be counterfeit, because they have those
> same seemingly random paterns of yellow marks all over the back!
> Should I tell the Secret Service?
> "twentys and fiftys and hundreds, oh my"

*NO!* Don't call the Secret Service!! Good grief, do you want to be
arrested for posession of counterfeit!! You are far too valuable to
the froup to risk yourself and your freedom in such a careless manner.
I have some contacts that should be able to dispose of them for us,
and I will of course return a portion of the proceeds back to you.
I'll contact you by private mail and give you a blind shipping
address where you can send those bills with no risk to either of us.
Oh, of course I will ask you to first reimburse me for the costs of
setting up this blind drop shipping address, so please be prepared to
give me your bank account numbers so I can arrange a transfer for you.
Anonymous
November 27, 2004 6:06:46 PM

Archived from groups: misc.consumers,comp.periphs.printers,alt.folklore.urban,alt.politics.libertarian (More info?)

Crashj wrote:

> Mygawd, all my big bills must be counterfeit, because they have those
> same seemingly random paterns of yellow marks all over the back!
> Should I tell the Secret Service?

Don't call the Secret Service, they'll arrest you for having
counterfeit bills. My friend Vinny will come over in 20 minutes to
pick them up. Vinny's service charge is $100, but if you don't have
that much in good bills, just give him a down payment and he'll trust
you for the rest.

--
Burroughs "Vinny the Hammer" Guy
Vaguer memories available upon request
Anonymous
November 27, 2004 9:01:10 PM

Archived from groups: misc.consumers,comp.periphs.printers,alt.folklore.urban,alt.politics.libertarian (More info?)

Hugh Gibbons wrote:
> In article <_pBod.25546$6q2.12792@newssvr14.news.prodigy.com>,
> "DC" <noreply@fakeaddress.com> wrote:
>
>
>>"Derek Lyons" <fairwater@gmail.com> wrote in message
>>
>>><adds note to Master Criminal File: Do not register printer when
>>>purchased, or purchase used printer under false name via eBay, or
>>>puchase printer with cash from a small computer store at least 300
>>>kilometers from the Lair.>
>>
>>also don't pay with a credit card, as that would allow them to track you
>>down.
>>
>>I'm surprised that the printer companies don't disclose that they do this in
>>the user manual.
>
>
> Hey, if you were a Master Criminal, would you BUY the printer?
>
>


What would Lex Luthor or The Joker do?


--
"It requires wisdom to understand wisdom:
the music is nothing if the audience is deaf."
Anonymous
November 29, 2004 6:07:30 PM

Archived from groups: misc.consumers,comp.periphs.printers,alt.folklore.urban,alt.politics.libertarian (More info?)

On Mon, 22 Nov 2004, MrPepper11 vociferated:

}PC World / Mon Nov 22, 2004
}Government Uses Color Laser Printer Technology to Track Documents
}Jason Tuohey, Medill News Service
}
}WASHINGTON--Next time you make a printout from your color laser
}printer, shine an LED flashlight beam on it and examine it closely
}with a magnifying glass. You might be able to see the small, scattered
}yellow dots printer there that could be used to trace the document
}back to you.
}
}According to experts, several printer companies quietly encode the
}serial number and the manufacturing code of their color laser printers
}and color copiers on every document those machines produce.
}Governments, including the United States, already use the hidden
}markings to track counterfeiters.


What they didn't reckon on is all those stores using the yellow felt-tip
pens to detect counterfeits. The yellow marks effectively cover up the
yellow dots.

Time for v.1.1 ...

Dr H
Anonymous
November 29, 2004 8:00:35 PM

Archived from groups: misc.consumers,comp.periphs.printers,alt.folklore.urban,alt.politics.libertarian (More info?)

On Mon, 29 Nov 2004 15:07:30 -0800, Dr H <hiawatha@efn.org>
wrote:

>
>On Mon, 22 Nov 2004, MrPepper11 vociferated:
>
>}PC World / Mon Nov 22, 2004
>}Government Uses Color Laser Printer Technology to Track Documents
>}Jason Tuohey, Medill News Service
>}
>}WASHINGTON--Next time you make a printout from your color laser
>}printer, shine an LED flashlight beam on it and examine it closely
>}with a magnifying glass. You might be able to see the small, scattered
>}yellow dots printer there that could be used to trace the document
>}back to you.
>}
>}According to experts, several printer companies quietly encode the
>}serial number and the manufacturing code of their color laser printers
>}and color copiers on every document those machines produce.
>}Governments, including the United States, already use the hidden
>}markings to track counterfeiters.
>
>
> What they didn't reckon on is all those stores using the yellow felt-tip
> pens to detect counterfeits. The yellow marks effectively cover up the
> yellow dots.

FYI, the pens have an iodine solution that is supposed to detect
the starch in cheap paper used in some counterfeit bills.

************* DAVE HATUNEN (hatunen@cox.net) *************
* Tucson Arizona, out where the cacti grow *
* My typos & mispellings are intentional copyright traps *
Anonymous
November 30, 2004 4:25:03 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

I imagine the code is repeated throughout the document, and any small
area that might be obscured by ink won't much matter.

Art

Dr H wrote:

> On Mon, 22 Nov 2004, MrPepper11 vociferated:
>
> }PC World / Mon Nov 22, 2004
> }Government Uses Color Laser Printer Technology to Track Documents
> }Jason Tuohey, Medill News Service
> }
> }WASHINGTON--Next time you make a printout from your color laser
> }printer, shine an LED flashlight beam on it and examine it closely
> }with a magnifying glass. You might be able to see the small, scattered
> }yellow dots printer there that could be used to trace the document
> }back to you.
> }
> }According to experts, several printer companies quietly encode the
> }serial number and the manufacturing code of their color laser printers
> }and color copiers on every document those machines produce.
> }Governments, including the United States, already use the hidden
> }markings to track counterfeiters.
>
>
> What they didn't reckon on is all those stores using the yellow felt-tip
> pens to detect counterfeits. The yellow marks effectively cover up the
> yellow dots.
>
> Time for v.1.1 ...
>
> Dr H
Anonymous
November 30, 2004 5:27:08 PM

Archived from groups: misc.consumers,comp.periphs.printers,alt.folklore.urban,alt.politics.libertarian (More info?)

On Mon, 29 Nov 2004, Hatunen vociferated:

}On Mon, 29 Nov 2004 15:07:30 -0800, Dr H <hiawatha@efn.org>
}wrote:
}
}>
}>On Mon, 22 Nov 2004, MrPepper11 vociferated:
}>
}>}PC World / Mon Nov 22, 2004
}>}Government Uses Color Laser Printer Technology to Track Documents
}>}Jason Tuohey, Medill News Service
}>}
}>}WASHINGTON--Next time you make a printout from your color laser
}>}printer, shine an LED flashlight beam on it and examine it closely
}>}with a magnifying glass. You might be able to see the small, scattered
}>}yellow dots printer there that could be used to trace the document
}>}back to you.
}>}
}>}According to experts, several printer companies quietly encode the
}>}serial number and the manufacturing code of their color laser printers
}>}and color copiers on every document those machines produce.
}>}Governments, including the United States, already use the hidden
}>}markings to track counterfeiters.
}>
}>
}> What they didn't reckon on is all those stores using the yellow felt-tip
}> pens to detect counterfeits. The yellow marks effectively cover up the
}> yellow dots.
}
}FYI, the pens have an iodine solution that is supposed to detect
}the starch in cheap paper used in some counterfeit bills.

I did know that, but thanks anyway.

For a time it was considered great fun amonst certain elements of the local
college crowd to coat $20s with spray starch, resulting is many embarassing
false positives.

Dr H
Anonymous
December 2, 2004 6:22:22 AM

Archived from groups: misc.consumers,comp.periphs.printers,alt.folklore.urban,alt.politics.libertarian (More info?)

On or about Tue, 30 Nov 2004 14:27:08 -0800, Dr H <hiawatha@efn.org>
wrote something like:
>On Mon, 29 Nov 2004, Hatunen vociferated:
<>
<>
>}FYI, the pens have an iodine solution that is supposed to detect
>}the starch in cheap paper used in some counterfeit bills.
>
> I did know that, but thanks anyway.
>
> For a time it was considered great fun amonst certain elements of the local
> college crowd to coat $20s with spray starch, resulting is many embarassing
> false positives.
>Dr H

I do not believe you said that without cracking a smile?

--
Crashj
Anonymous
December 2, 2004 6:31:15 AM

Archived from groups: misc.consumers,comp.periphs.printers,alt.folklore.urban,alt.politics.libertarian (More info?)

"Crashj" wrote ...
> On or about Tue, 30 Nov 2004 14:27:08 -0800, Dr H <hiawatha@efn.org>
> wrote something like:
>> For a time it was considered great fun amonst certain elements of the local
>> college crowd to coat $20s with spray starch, resulting is many embarassing
>> false positives.
>
> I do not believe you said that without cracking a smile?

Is that a question or not.
I do not believe my mind can take the strain?
December 7, 2004 4:21:31 PM

Archived from groups: misc.consumers,comp.periphs.printers,alt.folklore.urban,alt.politics.libertarian (More info?)

Hatunen wrote:
> On Mon, 29 Nov 2004 15:07:30 -0800, Dr H <hiawatha@efn.org>
> wrote:

>>
>>What they didn't reckon on is all those stores using the yellow felt-tip
>>pens to detect counterfeits. The yellow marks effectively cover up the
>>yellow dots.
>
>
> FYI, the pens have an iodine solution that is supposed to detect
> the starch in cheap paper used in some counterfeit bills.

See first item "you've seen it" on page

http://www.randi.org/jr/120304youve.html

--
Joe * If I cannot be free I'll be cheap
Anonymous
December 7, 2004 8:49:15 PM

Archived from groups: misc.consumers,comp.periphs.printers,alt.folklore.urban,alt.politics.libertarian (More info?)

On Thu, 2 Dec 2004, Crashj vociferated:

}On or about Tue, 30 Nov 2004 14:27:08 -0800, Dr H <hiawatha@efn.org>
}wrote something like:
}>On Mon, 29 Nov 2004, Hatunen vociferated:
}<>
}<>
}>}FYI, the pens have an iodine solution that is supposed to detect
}>}the starch in cheap paper used in some counterfeit bills.
}>
}> I did know that, but thanks anyway.
}>
}> For a time it was considered great fun amonst certain elements of the local
}> college crowd to coat $20s with spray starch, resulting is many embarassing
}> false positives.
}>Dr H
}
}I do not believe you said that without cracking a smile?

The libertarians wouldn't understand. But hey, for you?

:-)

Dr H
!