Land class scenery

Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

Hello all...

First of all can someone define what land class scenery is?

Secondly, is it available, freeware or payware, for the UK?

thanks!!

Colin Bear
6 answers Last reply
More about land class scenery
  1. Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

    On Wed, 13 Apr 2005 06:38:31 +0000 (UTC), "Colin Bear"
    <colin(nospam)bear@btinternet.com> brought the following to our
    attention:

    >Secondly, is it available, freeware or payware, for the UK?

    there's a U.K. land class folder installed here.. but no readme.txt or
    zip archive. It contains 49 files that zip to 94k. All the filenames
    have.. " _VRPs.bgl " in them. It's for FS8 however. :[


    -Gregory
  2. Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

    .... there came a great "Colin Bear" <colin(nospam)bear@btinternet.com>
    flying, and he bore tidings beyond hope, crying:

    >Hello all...
    >
    >First of all can someone define what land class scenery is?

    landclass scenery tells the flight simulator where to put which type
    of groudntexture (urban, desert, forest, ...)

    --
    "This is an extremely primitive and paranoid culture."
    (James T. Kirk on 20th century America, Star Trek IV)
  3. Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

    On Wed, 13 Apr 2005 10:03:24 -0400, Gregory
    <flightsim.maps@bkwds.comcast.net> brought the following to our
    attention:

    >On Wed, 13 Apr 2005 06:38:31 +0000 (UTC), "Colin Bear"
    ><colin(nospam)bear@btinternet.com> brought the following to our
    >attention:
    >
    >>Secondly, is it available, freeware or payware, for the UK?
    >
    >there's a U.K. land class folder installed here.. but no readme.txt or
    >zip archive. It contains 49 files that zip to 94k. All the filenames
    >have.. " _VRPs.bgl " in them. It's for FS8 however. :[
    >
    >
    > -Gregory

    oops.. sorry these files are for UK NavAids.. FS2002 / 04
    by Martin A McCormick

    It's another mistake or example of disorganization in the Scenery
    configuration / folder structure. should not be in land class section
    but in other scenery folder.. and with clear, self explanatory folder
    name!! :)

    -Gregory
  4. Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

    "Colin Bear" <colin(nospam)bear@btinternet.com> wrote in news:d3iep6$n36
    $1@titan.btinternet.com:

    > Hello all...
    >
    > First of all can someone define what land class scenery is?
    >

    Landclass is based on the geography concept that it is possible
    to characterize the earth surface by vegetation, soil, and
    built environment variations. This concept is useful to
    geographers, biologists, etc.

    For flight sim, there is the concept that earth surface has
    a visual appearance from the air that corresponds to the
    idea of land class. That is, it is possible to define types
    of land cover that appear the same from the air.

    So, FS9 has obtained, or built, a model of the entire earth that
    has assigned land classifications with a surface resolution of
    about 1.2 km square. This information is contained in the default
    file worldlc.bgl. This file assigns integer values of 0 - 255
    (not all are used in FS9) so there is a possibility of 256 different
    land classifications which could be assigned.

    FS9 uses the integer to map to a set of files in world\texture which
    represent the texture to be applied for that land class value. In
    addition to the texture file, 3D generic objects (called autogen)
    are tied to the files, to provide greater realism.

    In theory, it would only take 256 different texture files to serve the
    intended purpose, but this would be unsatisfactory for a couple reasons:

    1. Night. At night there is little ambient lighting (though moonshine
    could be depicted) but there is artificial surface lighting. So this is
    modeled by having a set of night textures. These are blended in at
    dusk/dawn.

    2. Seasons. In temperate zones, there can be a great deal of visual
    difference based on seasonal effects. FS9 uses a file seasons.bgl to
    select from a set of seasonal textures based on location and date.

    3. Cultural effects. Land with human impacts (intensive agriculture
    or habitation) has a different visual appearance due to cultural
    differences. FS9 has a file reagons.bgl to select culturally-modified
    texture variations.

    4. Checkerboard effect. When viewed from the air, the terrain textures
    at 1.2 km resolution would suffer from a tiling effect as the edge of
    each texture would be apparant, and the repeating nature of each tile
    (where several identical textures are placed side-by-side) would also
    reduce realism. FS9 attempts to get around this by having a set of
    textures with some visual variation, and the textures are blended with
    their neighboring textures on each of the 4 sides.

    5. Performance issues. Note that the textures have default size of
    256x256 pixels, but scenery displayed at a distance from the viewer
    doesn't need this level of accuracy, and so smaller versions
    (128x128, 64x64, etc) versions of each texture are stored and used in
    the distance.

    So, there a couple of ways to modify the land class system to change
    visual appearance. These can be summarized as:

    1. Modify the worldlc.bgl to change the land classification value for
    a given position. This is what is commonly referred to as "land class"
    file.

    2. Modify the textures in world\texture. The modified textures can
    have a different visual appearance, and also have different autogen
    objects assigned.

    3. Modify the land class integer mapping system through seasons.bgl,
    regions.bgl, and lclookup.bgl. To the best of my knowledge, no one
    has successfully done this.

    Note that there is also a complementary system (though simpler) to
    deal with the visual appearance of water bodies. Also, the land class
    derived textures are modified by drawing terrain features over them
    (airport and park ground textures, roads, railroads, streams, etc).
    Finally, land class can be over-ridden by phototextures.

    scott s.
    ..
  5. Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

    Best description I have ever read. Many thanks for your efforts, Scott.

    Arthur

    "scott s." <75270_3703a@csi.xcom> wrote in message
    news:Xns96377970FA702752703703acsicom@207.217.125.201...
    > "Colin Bear" <colin(nospam)bear@btinternet.com> wrote in news:d3iep6$n36
    > $1@titan.btinternet.com:
    >
    >> Hello all...
    >>
    >> First of all can someone define what land class scenery is?
    >>
    >
    > Landclass is based on the geography concept that it is possible
    > to characterize the earth surface by vegetation, soil, and
    > built environment variations. This concept is useful to
    > geographers, biologists, etc.
    >
    > For flight sim, there is the concept that earth surface has
    > a visual appearance from the air that corresponds to the
    > idea of land class. That is, it is possible to define types
    > of land cover that appear the same from the air.
    >
    > So, FS9 has obtained, or built, a model of the entire earth that
    > has assigned land classifications with a surface resolution of
    > about 1.2 km square. This information is contained in the default
    > file worldlc.bgl. This file assigns integer values of 0 - 255
    > (not all are used in FS9) so there is a possibility of 256 different
    > land classifications which could be assigned.
    >
    > FS9 uses the integer to map to a set of files in world\texture which
    > represent the texture to be applied for that land class value. In
    > addition to the texture file, 3D generic objects (called autogen)
    > are tied to the files, to provide greater realism.
    >
    > In theory, it would only take 256 different texture files to serve the
    > intended purpose, but this would be unsatisfactory for a couple reasons:
    >
    > 1. Night. At night there is little ambient lighting (though moonshine
    > could be depicted) but there is artificial surface lighting. So this is
    > modeled by having a set of night textures. These are blended in at
    > dusk/dawn.
    >
    > 2. Seasons. In temperate zones, there can be a great deal of visual
    > difference based on seasonal effects. FS9 uses a file seasons.bgl to
    > select from a set of seasonal textures based on location and date.
    >
    > 3. Cultural effects. Land with human impacts (intensive agriculture
    > or habitation) has a different visual appearance due to cultural
    > differences. FS9 has a file reagons.bgl to select culturally-modified
    > texture variations.
    >
    > 4. Checkerboard effect. When viewed from the air, the terrain textures
    > at 1.2 km resolution would suffer from a tiling effect as the edge of
    > each texture would be apparant, and the repeating nature of each tile
    > (where several identical textures are placed side-by-side) would also
    > reduce realism. FS9 attempts to get around this by having a set of
    > textures with some visual variation, and the textures are blended with
    > their neighboring textures on each of the 4 sides.
    >
    > 5. Performance issues. Note that the textures have default size of
    > 256x256 pixels, but scenery displayed at a distance from the viewer
    > doesn't need this level of accuracy, and so smaller versions
    > (128x128, 64x64, etc) versions of each texture are stored and used in
    > the distance.
    >
    > So, there a couple of ways to modify the land class system to change
    > visual appearance. These can be summarized as:
    >
    > 1. Modify the worldlc.bgl to change the land classification value for
    > a given position. This is what is commonly referred to as "land class"
    > file.
    >
    > 2. Modify the textures in world\texture. The modified textures can
    > have a different visual appearance, and also have different autogen
    > objects assigned.
    >
    > 3. Modify the land class integer mapping system through seasons.bgl,
    > regions.bgl, and lclookup.bgl. To the best of my knowledge, no one
    > has successfully done this.
    >
    > Note that there is also a complementary system (though simpler) to
    > deal with the visual appearance of water bodies. Also, the land class
    > derived textures are modified by drawing terrain features over them
    > (airport and park ground textures, roads, railroads, streams, etc).
    > Finally, land class can be over-ridden by phototextures.
    >
    > scott s.
    > .
    >
  6. Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

    On Wed, 13 Apr 2005 21:56:20 GMT, "scott s." <75270_3703a@csi.xcom>
    wrote:

    >Landclass is based on the geography concept that it is possible
    >to characterize the earth surface by vegetation, soil, and
    >built environment variations. This concept is useful to
    >geographers, biologists, etc.

    Thanks for all that, Scott - certainly a post to keep.

    James
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