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INTEL and Laptops

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  • CPUs
  • Laptops
  • Intel
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February 1, 2006 7:19:35 PM

Hey Guys, :roll:

Have a question concerning Intel capabilities and laptops in general and I'm hoping that you knowledgable Intel and laptop users can help me out. I have no idea and I mean NO IDEA of Intel processor capabilities at the current time and with this being said, I am helping my friend,which insists on an Intel, buy a laptop. I told her that it would be hard for me to help her find the performance she wants because I am clueless to Intel processor preformance now-a-days. She is looking for a laptop that would in-turn let her do the following:

-Store plenty of files (mp3, excel, word .doc, etc.)
-Video and Picture editing capabilities (not too extreme! i.e.>7800GTX) :wink:
-Not lag up too much

See, simple enough. Not looking into Dual Processor multi-tasking capabilities, however, I am looking for her laptop to be mid-upper-mediocre profiled. As far as screen resolution, once again not extreme but noticiable and make of the laptop - anything that doesnt "suck". Also, was looking for something not too extreme in price but thats not my problem, she was initially looking in BEST BUY! Anyways, Thanks in Advance

Marcus

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February 1, 2006 7:39:54 PM

Look for a Pentium-M equipped model, Dothan core, about 2.0G with 533 MHz FSB....these are quite fast, but the faster 2.13 and 2.26 GHz models are usually a large price jump up for the extra 5-10% core clock speed...(Try to get one with 533 MHz FSB, they are a bit faster than the 400 MHz FSB models, i.e. I'd much rather have a 2.0/533 than a 2.1/400)

(Note: all "Centrino" marked systems should have a Pentium- M Processor, and be wireless capable as is, etc.; there should be no dealers calling a Celeron-M based rig a "Centrino Technology" system....

(THe Pentium -M's are about as fast as an Athlon 64/Turion 64's on a clock-clock basis..., but the A64 models from HP are also quite nice; I have a nice 15.4" widescreen, 3000+, which I got on sale 8 months ago for $999; that is a good sale price even today...

Try to find a laptop with at LEAST 512 mb of DDR, and 1 gb is ideal....; 40-60 GB for the internal drive is plenty for most users, IMO; beyond that and one can always purchase an external USB 2.0 drive cheaply for additional storage.....


If not into 3d gaming on a laptop, the Intel Extreme Graphics 2 solution found on many laptops is more than enough for business and work....; I've even played old Q3 and the first Call of Duty Game on my 2nd laptop so equipped, and it is only a Celeron-M!
February 1, 2006 8:06:20 PM

I would agree that the AMD64s / Turion 64s are very nice.

Why is she insisting on Intel? Intel doesn't offer much and in many cases AMD destroys it.
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February 1, 2006 8:36:54 PM

When it comes to moblie chips it is a completely different story.
Intel beats or gets beaten by a little by AMD Moblie chips in benchmarks.
Read the comparsions in the mobility section of tomshardware.

Forgot who it was, but the person who said get the processor with the 533MHz FSB is correct. I've 1.5GHz 533Mhz and my friend has the 400MHz. There is a CLEAR and notable difference in speed.

Loading a C&C generals Lan game, i generally beat him by 2-4 seconds.

I've a Althon 64 Venice 3500+ desktop w/1 Gig ram
and a laptop 1.5Ghz with 768 Ram.
Graphics wise I get destroyed (diferent vid cards), but
for a CPU intensive game like C&C Generals,
my laptop holds up against the althon. Losing by a 3-5 second margin when loading. (Laptop runs game at 800x600 resolution and desktop runs at 1280X1024 resolution).
February 1, 2006 8:44:06 PM

i agree in this case. normally i would defend amd's processors. but i am looking for a laptop right now, and in my opinion intel offers the best performance and battery life in the mobile market right now. pentium m's are excellent chips.
February 1, 2006 8:54:19 PM

It depends, if you run AMD64 optimized software the AMDs will come out of top :D 

Intel was busted optimizing for their CPUs and unoptimizing for AMD CPUs and recently got sued over it.

All MFGs cheat on benchmarks btw, especially synthetic benchmarks which is why I prefer real world / application specific benchmarks.
February 1, 2006 9:33:21 PM

Thanks man,

Well Appreciated and in a timely manner on top of that. Kudos.
February 1, 2006 9:48:14 PM

I got an Acer 5502 with Pentium M 740, Duel Layer DVD+-R, Gig of RAM, ATI X700 video. A VERY fast computer (Halflife-2 with all max setting for example)
Not to mention built in WiFi, bluetooth, multi-flash card reader, S-Video out, etc. 14" wide screen, slim.
A lot of computer for US$ 1200
The only "problelms" I had is the screen is very relective.
The DVD drive is very sensitve to recording media (get a firmware update if you can)
The battery is small for a notebook with this much power.

I don't advertise for Acer, but this notebook is golden.
I got mine in Bangkok, but I hope it's available in the USA soon.
February 1, 2006 9:51:49 PM

Yeah I agree with mdd1963's info and it makes sense. I have a dell 9300 widescreen with the pentium M and it is very nice. Haven't had a single problem with it yet and I've had it now for about 7-8 months and it gets used alot. They say the pentium M's outperform the AMD chips. I would'nt know as I don't own a laptop with an AMD.
February 1, 2006 9:59:40 PM

when building/customizing/buying a laptop, some things should be taken into consideration:
-AMD64 is the only 64 bit option.
-Make SURE the memory speed is AT LEAST pc3200! Many Pentium M's use pc2700 which is just crap that chokes the CPU of bandwidth. I would recommend a Pentium M 2+ ghz. Considering a lot of the newer Pentium's use DDR2 533/667, this shouldn't be a big issue.
-Keep in mind, the more memory you have, the better battery life you have. Memory means data can be moved faster and without as large a file to be moving back and forth on the hard drive, which takes a lot more wattage. 2 gigabytes might not be a bad investment, and remember-don't buy high performance laptop ram as you can't adjust memory timings in a laptop BIOS.
-A warranty is always a good thing considering how easy laptops break, I have a thinkpad T41 and although it is supposedly one of the toughest, mine gets annhilated after a few months and has to be reformatted every so often (this is with 8 hours of use a day in a school week, though)
-Unless she is gaming, intel extreme graphics could save a boatload of money. However-if she is-and even a little, get something else. intel extreme graphics fails miserably at any game setting.
February 1, 2006 10:15:23 PM

Quote:
Intel mobile CPU are probably better than AMD moblie.


I'm an AMD fanboy at the moment but I must agree with what I quoted. Intel is still king of the mobile market (just the desktops blow).
February 1, 2006 10:45:08 PM

Quote:
when building/customizing/buying a laptop, some things should be taken into consideration:
-AMD64 is the only 64 bit option.


I agree :D 


Quote:

-Make SURE the memory speed is AT LEAST pc3200! Many Pentium M's use pc2700 which is just crap that chokes the CPU of bandwidth. I would recommend a Pentium M 2+ ghz. Considering a lot of the newer Pentium's use DDR2 533/667, this shouldn't be a big issue.


I agree with the PC3200 part, not so much with the DDR2 part. Many laptops use the cheapest RAM the MFG can which usually means PC2100 or PC2700. I have seen virtually all P4 and Pentium M laptops come with PC2100 or PC2700 and NOT PC3200. In fact sometimes the chipset is crippled and can't handle PC3200. The same is true for DDR2.



Quote:

-Keep in mind, the more memory you have, the better battery life you have. Memory means data can be moved faster and without as large a file to be moving back and forth on the hard drive, which takes a lot more wattage. 2 gigabytes might not be a bad investment, and remember-don't buy high performance laptop ram as you can't adjust memory timings in a laptop BIOS.
-A warranty is always a good thing considering how easy laptops break, I have a thinkpad T41 and although it is supposedly one of the toughest, mine gets annihilated after a few months and has to be reformatted every so often (this is with 8 hours of use a day in a school week, though)
-Unless she is gaming, intel extreme graphics could save a boatload of money. However-if she is-and even a little, get something else. intel extreme graphics fails miserably at any game setting.



I agree :-D except for the intel extreme GFX it is anything BUT extreme!


I have had a P4 laptop before. Unfortunately I have not owned any AMD laptops but I have examined them very closely.

The P4 desktop replacement laptop I had sucked pretty bad even though it was quite expensive. Was very disappointed with its performance, it got really hot and ran out of battery in 45-60min, granted the Pentium M is a LOT better than the P4 for laptops but I would argue the AMDs have some great features and great performance.

Semper Fi Linux on!
February 1, 2006 10:49:59 PM

Quote:
I would agree that the AMD64s / Turion 64s are very nice.

Why is she insisting on Intel? Intel doesn't offer much and in many cases AMD destroys it.


I read somewhere that AMD compared its products to the Intel performance-equivalent unfairly because sure it gave the same or better performance than the pentium M, but it ran way hotter in comparison. Thus was not for the thin + light category of notebook, whereas the benefit of Intel's stuff, you can. In other words Intel's chips run cooler than AMD's... 8O :? That's not something you hear everyday...
February 1, 2006 10:56:23 PM

u'r true man.

yeah intel is the king as of the moment in the laptop arena, with their duo cores.

if you want more power. try alienware ( alienware.com ) mobile workstation powered by AMD Fx /Opteron.. and that's what i call mobile power.
February 1, 2006 11:05:08 PM

Software optimized for AMD64 will run a lot better and much faster. Thus if your software takes advantage of the AMD64 optimizations it will be faster than on Intel.
February 1, 2006 11:07:39 PM

Quote:
I agree :-D except for the intel extreme GFX it is anything BUT extreme!


i'll second that
February 1, 2006 11:27:19 PM

Quote:
Software optimized for AMD64 will run a lot better and much faster. Thus if your software takes advantage of the AMD64 optimizations it will be faster than on Intel.


I agree, but really how many people, on the commercial level, are aware of Win64 and all the programs that run on the 64 level? Honestly, there are not enough programs out right now for people to notice the significance you are talking about with the software today, however by the time it does come out, I am sure the Athlon 64 models will be the old worn in one. With this I mean, the X2's are in and the capabilities of these plus the 64 bit will improve along with the 940 socket and the new one which I dont recall is out as well for like $1200 (something crazy like that). But really, like I said before I agree, and my opinions are said but have little to room to talk because:

DFI Lanparty NF4 Ultra D
AMD Athlon 64 3700/AS5
Thermalright SI-120<<DELTA EHE (WTF!) :twisted:
XFX 7800GTX 490-1300 (another WTF!) 8O
OCZ (2) 512 El Plat Rev 2
(2) 80gb Seagate Barr. 7200.7 >>soon to be Raid 0
Western Dig. 160
Antec TP2 550
Antec P180 Case
February 2, 2006 12:08:42 AM

Quote:
I agree with the PC3200 part, not so much with the DDR2 part. Many laptops use the cheapest RAM the MFG can which usually means PC2100 or PC2700. I have seen virtually all P4 and Pentium M laptops come with PC2100 or PC2700 and NOT PC3200. In fact sometimes the chipset is crippled and can't handle PC3200. The same is true for DDR2.

There is a reason why many Pentium M's ship with PC2700 and not PC3200. The reason is simply that the i855, i865, and i915 only support DDR333 not DDR400. The chipset isn't crippler, it was never a feature. Manufacturers gain nothing by using DDR400.

If you are buying a Pentium M, then the correct choice is DDR2 533 and an i915 chipset. The 533MHz FSB does make a nice performance difference although the battery life is shorter. There isn't any point going with DDR since only DDR333 is available and is only in single channel mode. The best performance is received using DDR2 533 since it runs in sync with the FSB to lower latency. Latency will still be higher than DDR333, but at least you aren't bandwidth starved which is more important in this case. As well, by using DDR2 533, you have the option of going dual channel later.

As well, since I am recommending the i915 if you get the built-in graphics version you will be receiving the DMA900. It may not be great, but its a vast improvement over Extreme Graphics 2, average at least twice the performance if not more. It's also DirectX 9 compliant so newer games will run as long as you use lower settings. To get the maximum performance from the DMA900, you will need dual channel DDR2 533. This will ensure 533MHz from 1 channel is dedicated to filling up the FSB, while the other 533MHz from the other channel goes toward the DMA900. The difference isn't drastic, but every bit counts if you do decide to light game on it. I believe the DMA900 also offers better video acceleration than the Extreme Graphics 2 which is great in multimedia presentations through projectors.

Of course, if you go Core Duo you will be using the i945 chipset. In that case, DDR is no longer supported and DDR2 667 is needed to run in sync with the processor. The DMA950 has higher clock speeds and just edges into the acceptable gaming performance category. (At least the desktop version does, the notebook version probably slows down to save power and heat though).
February 2, 2006 12:13:56 AM

I use Fedora Core x86_64 and virtually everything I run is AMD64 optimized :D 

Check this out

https://spare2.com/bench/index.html

FC3 i386

FC3 x86_64

Dual Opteron 252s with hardware RAID5 :D 

FC3 x86_64 is noticeably better :D 
!