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Avoiding static shock to components during a build

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February 2, 2006 5:08:01 PM

The components of my new rig are arriving early next week and
it only just occured to me that I might want some ESD strap to
avoid static buildup and avoid zapping my nice new components :-)

Does anyone have any advice is this worth doing and if so how?

Thanks

More about : avoiding static shock components build

February 2, 2006 5:17:49 PM

Its as simple as just grouding yourself out. To be crude you could use a speaker wire to ground yourself out. Just fasten it to the chasis of the case, then make a wrist band out of the other, you shuold be ok.

keep all plastic away from your work area and try not to assemble on or near a carpet. Try to make an assembly line of your parts & set the parts up on a anti-staic bag like the ones your mobo is wrapped in.
February 2, 2006 5:43:57 PM

When I deal with computers, I always have one hand on the case whenever I touch a part. Even when I put parts in, I have my forearm resting on the case.

Static straps can be nice, but you don't really need one if you're careful.
Also try to minimize your movement on carpet if you have it.
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February 2, 2006 5:45:54 PM

Thanks guys. Makes sense :-)
February 2, 2006 6:03:16 PM

touch the power supply of your comp once in awhile.

But if you want a sure method, get an anti-static bracelet
February 2, 2006 6:07:30 PM

Aside from an ESD wrist strap you can also use a ESD rubber mat to step on and an ESD place mat for your electronics/computer to place on. Other than you can also use rubber gloves, aviod wearing nylon base clothing such as jerseys and stuff. Thats what I used everytime I spend some time on my PC. You can never be too safe, and it's a good way to protect your investment/pc. :idea:
February 2, 2006 6:18:06 PM

In my 18 years within the IT Industry, I never used any anti static straps. I have put computers together on carpet, pull things with power on and left boards laying all over the place.

The only time I ever lost a piece of equipment is late one Friday afternoon (was in England so 'assume' I might have had a few pints in the pub over lunchtime) when I completely forgot to turn the power OFF and watched in some amusement (read: horror) when I inserted a network card and fried the only spare PC I had - that was urgently required.

Back in those days (early 90's) you generally did not have spare motherboards in your junk draw. Never had problems *pulling* with power on, but never *put* something IN with power on.. that's just stupid :) 

Anyway, when I came to build MY first home PC (only recently) I immediately went out and purchased an anti static strap !! No point taking chances with my own stuff. 8)
February 2, 2006 6:28:37 PM

Some mobos come with anti-static wrist wraps. If not, I think you can get one off of newegg or some PC brick and mortar store near you
February 3, 2006 2:50:24 AM

If you are in high humidity, almost zero danger. Very low humidity, like cold frozen places with the heater on and wool socks, BAD. I lived in Hawaii as the Tech Office for my unit and we could not get static shock if we tried. When I was stationed in the desert, man, you could see the sparks fly off your fingertips sometimes. And if you are not familiar with static electricity, some voltages can be 5-10 k volts. Just really tiny current. That is why you dont die. My experience , that is all. But if it is dry and cold, be carefull! Good luck. PS, I have never fried a piece as far as I know myself. And our stuff was huge sgi imaging hardware for mapping ect. (big bucks) well, army always pays double or tripple, huh.
February 3, 2006 5:19:57 AM

I've built my own PC's for almost 10 years now and I've never ever had any problems with static electricity, I just make sure to be careful not to bump stuff around too much. I figure that if this stuff is robust enough to go through UPS and Fedex and such, that it should be ok to set on my carpet once in a while ha ha.

Anyway, i've never had a component failure due to static discharge.
February 3, 2006 6:51:42 AM

Yeah like you said I too always keep contact with the metal frame of the case.. Good and safe then. Never fried anything cept for that time I was working on the carpet

Down in antarctica you most of the time get shocks off the door handles lol

other day my mate was disassembling his broken digital camera and accidentaly touched the monster capacitor it had in it then his bro came along and thought it was discharged and picked it up and got a 335V zap off it lol it was funny OK that's got nothing to do with static
February 3, 2006 5:29:28 PM

Quote:
Yeah like you said I too always keep contact with the metal frame of the case.. Good and safe then. Never fried anything cept for that time I was working on the carpet

Down in antarctica you most of the time get shocks off the door handles lol

other day my mate was disassembling his broken digital camera and accidentaly touched the monster capacitor it had in it then his bro came along and thought it was discharged and picked it up and got a 335V zap off it lol it was funny OK that's got nothing to do with static


I'm in S. Cal, and its pretty dry out here (usually), so thats why I always keep in contact w/ the case. Also, its safer in the long run because then I know the component isn't zapped because of me. If it does get zapped, then its a pain and a half to figure out what's dead.

Hehe, zapping people with capacitors is fun.. reminds me of EE lab... along w/ burning resistors and watching them glow... and the screaming prof telling us not to inhale the smoke. hehe
February 3, 2006 7:40:44 PM

Building a computer 101...

1)put on some wool socks!
2)run around your house, preferably on carpet, like a mad man dragging your feet as much as possible. In fact try to slide around your house!
3)Grab you MB for installation and watch the sparks fly!
4)After installing your MB, repeat step 2, then finish installing your cpu and heatsink.
5)Repeat step 2 for fun... WHEEEE
6)Snatch up those video cards and slap em in, with any luck you'll zap some more componets for my sparks to fly.
7)Take a break, from the computer build atleast, and go get some "u know what" (edited for young eyes they may browse the boards :)  (preferably with your wool socks still on)
8)If you have the energy left after step 7, go ahead and repeat step 2.
9)Finish the build by pressing down on you MB to make sure it won't move when you stand your tower up.
10)Congratulations, push the power button and watch her fry, err i mean fly!
February 4, 2006 9:32:26 PM

Very simple, just take your shoes and socks off and you'll be grounded.

Of course you don't want to work in a wet environment with live electrics like this.
February 4, 2006 10:16:51 PM

Quote:
Very simple, just take your shoes and socks off and you'll be grounded.


what if you're standing on carpet?
February 5, 2006 5:18:36 AM

I'm not sure, but I'll check. I think even if you're standing on carpet (barefooted) you're grounded or will at least discharge any buildup of electricity through your feet.
February 5, 2006 6:03:52 AM

Wearing static wrist strap ground your body, discharging the static charge. Wearing latex gloves prevents direct contact to the hardware, however does not discharge the static energy. So wearing static strap is a must when working with ESD sensitive material/hardware like computer components such as CPU, card etc. And with addition use of latex gloves, mats, and not wearing of nylon clothing like jerseys will increase in prevention of static mishaps while working.

I see your new in building, don't get frustrated when you run into some obstacles and problems during assembly and scratch or pull your hair. It can cause plenty of static charge.

Note: ESD can be felt only in excess of 3,000 volts. So when u got zap by the door knob that means 3,000 volts or more of ESD are generated, that's not good when static jumps on semiconductor, it will fry it.

Good Luck
!