Trick for approaching airport runways?

Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

What is the trick to approaching correct runways?

If I am flying to an airport via VOR, I understand that the VOR gets me
there, but it doesn't get me to approach the correct runway in the
position I want to be to land.

I.E. Suppose I am heading to an airport via VOR at a heading of 360
degrees. I am 6 miles out and the tower reuest that I land on runway
90R. Now I realize that the runway would be on a heading of 90
degrees, and I can cheat the VOR by turing the heading card to match
the radius, which would then line me up for the right approach, but how
is it really done? Or do pilots just fly to within a certain distance
and then head into the crosswind, downwind, base traffic pattern that
is indicated within MSFS?

Just wondering, I can get to the airport, but I always want to fly
straight in to land because it ives me the best chance for an easy
landing. In the ILS lesson it's much easier because you have the VOR,
and then the ILS to bring you in, but it's always direct landings.
12 answers Last reply
More about trick approaching airport runways
  1. Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

    Other people should jump in here, but since it's a Saturday and you
    probably want to fly NOW, here are some pointers:

    If you have filed an IFR flight plan, you will get vectors to approach
    from air traffic control (ATC).

    If you're flying VFR, have a look at the Learning Center articles on
    Air Traffic Control. The one that will be most immediately useful is
    "Airport Traffic Patterns." If it's a towered airport, contact tower
    and follow his or her directions (e.g., fly straight in, make base,
    make downwind, etc.). If you haven't tried talking to a controller yet,
    hit the ~ key and follow the menus when you get within 10-15 miles of
    the airport. There's lots more you can do with radio comms, but that
    will be enough to get you talking with the control tower and
    established for landing.

    If the airport is NOT towered (and most aren't), standard procedure for
    VFR is to join the downwind leg at a 45 degree angle. More details and
    and nice diagrams in the FAA "Airplane Flying Handbook," which you can
    download free in chunks.
    http://av-info.faa.gov/data/traininghandbook/faa-h-8083-3a-4of7.pdf

    _________________________________________________________
    Posted via the -Web to Usenet- forums at http://forums.simradar.com
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  2. Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

    It's really tough to learn this from a newsgroup but the tutorials on
    these sites will really help:

    http://www.navfltsm.addr.com/
    http://www.stevesflightschool.com/

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    <snoopy_@excite.com> wrote in message
    news:1113666522.938099.313580@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
    > What is the trick to approaching correct runways?
    >
    > If I am flying to an airport via VOR, I understand that the VOR gets me
    > there, but it doesn't get me to approach the correct runway in the
    > position I want to be to land.
    >
    > I.E. Suppose I am heading to an airport via VOR at a heading of 360
    > degrees. I am 6 miles out and the tower reuest that I land on runway
    > 90R. Now I realize that the runway would be on a heading of 90
    > degrees, and I can cheat the VOR by turing the heading card to match
    > the radius, which would then line me up for the right approach, but how
    > is it really done? Or do pilots just fly to within a certain distance
    > and then head into the crosswind, downwind, base traffic pattern that
    > is indicated within MSFS?
    >
    > Just wondering, I can get to the airport, but I always want to fly
    > straight in to land because it ives me the best chance for an easy
    > landing. In the ILS lesson it's much easier because you have the VOR,
    > and then the ILS to bring you in, but it's always direct landings.
    >
  3. Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

    shorter version. tune your VOR to the same heading as teh runway you want
    to land on. Intercept and fly that VOR

    <snoopy_@excite.com> wrote in message
    news:1113666522.938099.313580@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
    > What is the trick to approaching correct runways?
    >
    > If I am flying to an airport via VOR, I understand that the VOR gets me
    > there, but it doesn't get me to approach the correct runway in the
    > position I want to be to land.
    >
    > I.E. Suppose I am heading to an airport via VOR at a heading of 360
    > degrees. I am 6 miles out and the tower reuest that I land on runway
    > 90R. Now I realize that the runway would be on a heading of 90
    > degrees, and I can cheat the VOR by turing the heading card to match
    > the radius, which would then line me up for the right approach, but how
    > is it really done? Or do pilots just fly to within a certain distance
    > and then head into the crosswind, downwind, base traffic pattern that
    > is indicated within MSFS?
    >
    > Just wondering, I can get to the airport, but I always want to fly
    > straight in to land because it ives me the best chance for an easy
    > landing. In the ILS lesson it's much easier because you have the VOR,
    > and then the ILS to bring you in, but it's always direct landings.
    >
  4. Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

    Hi just cursing through saw this and believe I am no pro but if you can
    learn to fly this pattern and do it according to the specs then you can
    land almost any airport without problem. Practice this over and over
    till you figure it out. Then to see if you have learned anything change
    airports not just runways and do it again.

    http://www.navfltsm.addr.com/basic-nav-general.htm

    go to the bottom of this page there is a link there to down load the
    picture and how to's so you can have it in a folder. Here is the link
    for the beginning of the whole web site. I downloaded every page of
    this and studied it. There is more information here about VOR and NDB's
    than you really need to fly but it is the best place I have found.

    http://www.navfltsm.addr.com/index.htm

    Ken

    _________________________________________________________
    Posted via the -Web to Usenet- forums at http://forums.simradar.com
    Visit www.simradar.com and try our Flight Simulation Search Engine!
  5. Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

    "David Wilson-Okamura" <David Wilson-Okamura@forums.simradar.com> wrote in
    message news:1113669191.22762@forums.simradar.com...
    More details and
    > and nice diagrams in the FAA "Airplane Flying Handbook," which you can
    > download free in chunks.
    > http://av-info.faa.gov/data/traininghandbook/faa-h-8083-3a-4of7.pdf

    Here's a link to the menu for the rest of this manual:
    http://www.faa.gov/library/manuals/airplane_handbook/
  6. Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

    If you're trying to visualize entry into the traffic pattern, I found
    an even better diagram here on page 3:
    http://www.seaartcc.net/general/events/pugetpassion/Flying%20VFR%20on%2
    0VATSIM.pdf

    _________________________________________________________
    Posted via the -Web to Usenet- forums at http://forums.simradar.com
    Visit www.simradar.com and try our Flight Simulation Search Engine!
  7. Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

    Not correct if flying a procedure off a chart with an off-centreline
    approach inbound on the VOR.

    Usually the VOR/DME approach will lead either to close to final approach
    direction, or leads to the Circuit pattern with the option for a Circling
    Visual Approach when visual. The end part of a VOR/DME approach should
    always be visual. You have a minimum Descent Altitude and at that point you
    HAVE to be visual to continue the approach. You can however transition to
    the Visual Approach from the moment you land. Depending on what kind of
    VOR/DME approach also. Is it an approach generic for the entire airport, or
    is it specific to a runway? If it is specific to a runway you should
    transition to Visual from the moment you are either visual or number 1 for
    approach (whichever is later). You will then come off the VOR track and
    visually line up for the runway. A number of turns will be required because
    the VOR is not on the runway centreline. If you are on a generic VOR
    approach which ends in visual to both runways, you should enter the Visual
    Landing Pattern, or the Circling Visual Approach. Circling Visual gets you
    in quicker, but usually has a higher minimums. A Circling Visual Approach
    means you come off the heading and track an arc down to the runway,
    descending all the time. Like a long descending turn down to short finals,
    quite a difficult manuver to master in the sim because of lack of peripheral
    vision. The Circuit option would mean you would enter the circuit at circuit
    altitude. If you were to enter a circuit on the other side of the active
    runway (ie you have to cross over) you should cross the runway at Circuit
    Altitude plus 500ft.

    A Circling Approach can be thought of as joining the Circuit from Base. If
    you are joining the circuit as standard it should be from Downwind at least,
    or perhaps cross overhead the VOR (crossing the runway centreline) at
    Circuit altitude +500. Descend to Circuit altitude on the dead side and turn
    to join on Crosswind of the circuit (crossing the runway centreline again)
    Turn Downwind, Base and Finals and landing.

    "Jay Williams" <Voodoo141@buggeroffspammercox.net> wrote in message
    news:6Qk8e.539$yO2.477@lakeread07...
    > shorter version. tune your VOR to the same heading as teh runway you want
    > to land on. Intercept and fly that VOR
    >
    > <snoopy_@excite.com> wrote in message
    > news:1113666522.938099.313580@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
    >> What is the trick to approaching correct runways?
    >>
    >> If I am flying to an airport via VOR, I understand that the VOR gets me
    >> there, but it doesn't get me to approach the correct runway in the
    >> position I want to be to land.
    >>
    >> I.E. Suppose I am heading to an airport via VOR at a heading of 360
    >> degrees. I am 6 miles out and the tower reuest that I land on runway
    >> 90R. Now I realize that the runway would be on a heading of 90
    >> degrees, and I can cheat the VOR by turing the heading card to match
    >> the radius, which would then line me up for the right approach, but how
    >> is it really done? Or do pilots just fly to within a certain distance
    >> and then head into the crosswind, downwind, base traffic pattern that
    >> is indicated within MSFS?
    >>
    >> Just wondering, I can get to the airport, but I always want to fly
    >> straight in to land because it ives me the best chance for an easy
    >> landing. In the ILS lesson it's much easier because you have the VOR,
    >> and then the ILS to bring you in, but it's always direct landings.
    >>
    >
    >
  8. Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

    The UK CAA has a very nice and useful pdf entitled "The Standard
    Overhead Join" which can be found at
    http://www.caa.co.uk/docs/64/DAP_ACD_12_overhead_join.pdf

    HTH

    Ian.
  9. Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

    Hi Snoop;

    You didn't say if you are VFR or on an IFR flight plan when you're
    approaching this airport. Which are you?
    Dudley

    <snoopy_@excite.com> wrote in message
    news:1113666522.938099.313580@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
    > What is the trick to approaching correct runways?
    >
    > If I am flying to an airport via VOR, I understand that the VOR gets me
    > there, but it doesn't get me to approach the correct runway in the
    > position I want to be to land.
    >
    > I.E. Suppose I am heading to an airport via VOR at a heading of 360
    > degrees. I am 6 miles out and the tower reuest that I land on runway
    > 90R. Now I realize that the runway would be on a heading of 90
    > degrees, and I can cheat the VOR by turing the heading card to match
    > the radius, which would then line me up for the right approach, but how
    > is it really done? Or do pilots just fly to within a certain distance
    > and then head into the crosswind, downwind, base traffic pattern that
    > is indicated within MSFS?
    >
    > Just wondering, I can get to the airport, but I always want to fly
    > straight in to land because it ives me the best chance for an easy
    > landing. In the ILS lesson it's much easier because you have the VOR,
    > and then the ILS to bring you in, but it's always direct landings.
    >
  10. Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

    Dudley,
    I was VOR. I was playing with the OBS dial an dialing in the same
    radial I figured the runway would be, but I thought that was cheating
    or maybe more correctly the wrong application to using VOR.

    I flew a couple of the IFR flights and that is much simpler, the ATC
    usually lines you straight up, but most times the ATC takes you way out
    of your way, at least it feels tht way. I guess they vector you around
    other aircrafts, etc....

    Now I need to study the ways to join a traffic pattern, there seems
    to be so many.

    I was using MSFS to try to figure out if I should take lessons or
    not. I find it difficult to figure out what I'd do witht he license if
    I got one. I like the simulator, and the navigation, but I don't know
    how practical having a license would be; would I use it? $5,000 -
    $6,000 for the private, then another $7,000 - $8,000 for Intrument.
    And where do I have to go?
  11. Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

    snoopy_@excite.com wrote:

    > Dudley,
    >
    >
    > Now I need to study the ways to join a traffic pattern, there seems
    > to be so many.
    >
    > I was using MSFS to try to figure out if I should take lessons or
    > not. I find it difficult to figure out what I'd do witht he license if
    > I got one. I like the simulator, and the navigation, but I don't know
    > how practical having a license would be; would I use it? $5,000 -
    > $6,000 for the private, then another $7,000 - $8,000 for Intrument.
    > And where do I have to go?
    >


    Hello Snoop. Pardon me but here are some alternatives to the high cost
    of the Private Pilot License. To me, it's a whole lot more fun and you
    may like it also. Just reading your posts I believe you could benefit
    from the following URL's. And later on if you do want a PPL, it will be
    so much easier.


    http://www.sportpilot.org/brochures/

    http://www.sportpilot.org/

    http://www.usua.org/SportPilot/

    http://afs600.faa.gov/documents/PDF/LSA-CertModels.pdf

    http://www.faa.gov/avr/afs/sportpilot/index.cfm


    --

    boB, SAG 70

    U.S. Army Aviation (retired)
    Central Texas - 5NM West of Gray Army Airfield (KGRK)
  12. Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

    On Sat, 23 Apr 2005 01:24:50 GMT, boB <akitaREMOVECAPS77@excite.Icom>
    wrote:

    >snoopy_@excite.com wrote:
    >
    >> Dudley,
    >>
    >>
    >> Now I need to study the ways to join a traffic pattern, there seems
    >> to be so many.
    >>
    >> I was using MSFS to try to figure out if I should take lessons or
    >> not. I find it difficult to figure out what I'd do witht he license if
    >> I got one. I like the simulator, and the navigation, but I don't know
    >> how practical having a license would be; would I use it? $5,000 -
    >> $6,000 for the private, then another $7,000 - $8,000 for Intrument.
    >> And where do I have to go?

    If you can afford it, and really like to play then go for the private,
    instrument, and commercial.

    Where you have to go is up to you. Do you like to travel? Can you
    afford to travel? Vacations? Visit friends and family over
    distances. My daughter lives in Colorado and my son and his family is
    in Georgia. My wife's folks lived in Florida until her mother passed
    away. We live in Central Michigan (where on the 23 of May we are
    looking at the possibility of a blizzard this week end). There for a
    while I was putting on over 130 hours a year and over half was on long
    cross countries

    OTOH if you really don't have any place to go and just want to play
    around your home airport, *then* consider the sport pilot license.

    The sport pilot license is a great addition, if it is not too limiting
    for what you want to do.

    Roger Halstead (K8RI & ARRL life member)
    (N833R, S# CD-2 Worlds oldest Debonair)
    www.rogerhalstead.com
    >>
    >
    >
    >Hello Snoop. Pardon me but here are some alternatives to the high cost
    >of the Private Pilot License. To me, it's a whole lot more fun and you
    >may like it also. Just reading your posts I believe you could benefit
    >from the following URL's. And later on if you do want a PPL, it will be
    >so much easier.
    >
    >
    >http://www.sportpilot.org/brochures/
    >
    >http://www.sportpilot.org/
    >
    >http://www.usua.org/SportPilot/
    >
    >http://afs600.faa.gov/documents/PDF/LSA-CertModels.pdf
    >
    >http://www.faa.gov/avr/afs/sportpilot/index.cfm
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