Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

HDD capacity problem ( Maxtor 300 GB Shows 279 GB)

Last response: in Storage
Share
February 8, 2006 5:47:56 AM

Hi . I have bought a new Hard drive ( Maxtor 300GB IDE Diamondmax10). Win Xp sp1 shows this HDD capacity 279.47 GB . my mobo is MSI KT6 Delta with latest Bios version . Pleas help me about this larg difference ( ~ 21 GB ) .Is it normal tings ?
Thanks
February 8, 2006 6:02:33 AM

Yes, this is absolutely normal. Hard drive manufactures pretend that 1GB is 1000MB when we all actually know its 1024mbs. Therefore your real hard drive space will be less than what it is claimed to be.
a b G Storage
February 8, 2006 5:19:24 PM

I have 2 250gb drives in a raid 0 formated size is only 465 gig.
yea it sucks but your not really losing any space.
like toxiccow said its the 1000MB to 1024MB mixup.
Related resources
February 8, 2006 5:44:43 PM

You lose an average of 7% on a hard drive after formatting, I've seen some drives lose only 5% and some lose 9%, but 99% of drives lose 7%. Not really "losing", but you get what I mean.

~~Mad Mod Mike, pimpin' the world 1 rig at a time
February 8, 2006 6:36:18 PM

Here's your same problem in laymen's terms:

Your hardrive is probably 300,000,000,000.00 Bytes or so.

Divided by 1024 (1k in computer language) you get:

292,968,750.00 KBytes. Divided again by 1024 you get:

286,102.29 MBytes. Divided yet again by 1024 you get:

279.40 GBytes, which is what you are reporting.

In fact, you are .07 GBytes OVER the advertised value, so you have nothing to worry about. You can check the properties in your computer of any file and you will find that your computer does indeed divide by 1024, not 1000 when referencing file size. Advertisers, however, use 1000 to divide between kB, MB, and GB because it results in a larger number to sell to you.

Which is also why advertised 4.7 GByte DVDs only register 4.37 GBytes INSIDE your computer.

BTW, I'll bet inside "My Computer" your harddrive properties probably says:

Capacity: 300,078,627,554 Bytes (plus or minus a few)
February 8, 2006 6:51:54 PM

One last thing, 279.47 GBytes is 93% of the 300 GBytes total advertised. This is a 7% disparity caused by advertising, not formatting!
February 8, 2006 7:07:28 PM

Like everybody else has said, this is a difference between marketing numbers and system numbers.

However, the really sad part is that it used to be correct! Many years ago, drives were reported with true MB readings. Then some idiot marketing guy said: "Why can't we redefine the meaning of MB to powers of 10 rather than powers of 2 in order to make it look like our drive has more space than the competitor?" Needless to say, everybody jumped on the bandwagon, confusing the customer in the end.

This happens all of the time, and continues to be an issue when talking about FSB speeds and memory bandwidth. I just wish it would stop...
February 8, 2006 7:47:23 PM

Quote:
Hi . I have bought a new Hard drive ( Maxtor 300GB IDE Diamondmax10). Win Xp sp1 shows this HDD capacity 279.47 GB . my mobo is MSI KT6 Delta with latest Bios version . Pleas help me about this larg difference ( ~ 21 GB ) .Is it normal tings ?
Thanks


wow, looks like you got ripped off man. Take 'em to court... don't hold back. :roll:
February 8, 2006 8:33:14 PM

The formatted vs unformatted capacity penalty only applied to really old (pre IDE) hard drives. And the penatlty occured only when you did a "low level" format, which is something that is not even possible with an IDE drive.

Another myth is that the partion table or file system eats up a great deal of avaliable disc space. I once created 20 partions to disprove this to a friend. I aslo completely filled a 10 GB NTFS and 10 GB FAT 32 partion down to the last KB to show that they are both more than 99% efficient.

It would probably be 99.99% efficent execpt for the fact that files get rounded to the nearest cluster size. Very small files are stored directly in the file table so that don't waste space.
February 8, 2006 10:35:36 PM

1 Gigabyte (GB) = 1,073,741,824 Byte
1 Gigabyte (GB) = 1,048,576 Kilobyte (KB)
1 Gigabyte (GB) = 1,024 Megabyte (MB)

This is where the confusion lies.

Remeber the class action lawsuit against display manufactures? Claiming tube size of 21", but viewable size of 19.9"
February 9, 2006 5:05:57 AM

I have an excuse. I just got two Western Digital Caviar RE2 400GB drives and I need to kill time while I run extended test on both drives, set up the RAID 1 array, then format the array and finally move over 200 GB of data so I can yank the three noisy 4 year old WD 120's out of my system for good.

21 minutes and my PC will no longer have a high pitch whine.
February 9, 2006 6:28:41 AM

Quote:
Hi . I have bought a new Hard drive ( Maxtor 300GB IDE Diamondmax10). Win Xp sp1 shows this HDD capacity 279.47 GB . my mobo is MSI KT6 Delta with latest Bios version . Pleas help me about this larg difference ( ~ 21 GB ) .Is it normal tings ?
Thanks


Like the other people said 8) 1000MB per GB in advertising, 1024MB per GB in reality. Its 2^20 rather than 10^2.

This has happened since the beginning of computers, but on old 40GB HDDs people werent really complaining if they 'actually' had 39.2GB. Know what I mean? Only at large capacities do the marketing departments have non-techies with their underwear in a twist :p 

I have 2 of these drives, both show 279GB. So dont worry - its normal :D 
February 9, 2006 7:10:44 AM

But it makes me wonder why they would use that.
February 9, 2006 8:14:44 AM

If you can con people into believing that they are getting more then you will do better business.
February 10, 2006 6:08:22 AM

yes man. this is retarded

Whats going to happen when they try selling us 8GB and 16GB of RAM? Will they give us the full 16384MB??
February 10, 2006 6:20:25 AM

"09. I purchaced a 40Gb drive. Why do i only get 38Gb of free space?
Now this is an odd one. Basically its to do with Math. Drive manufacturers count capacity in decimal:
i.e. 1 Gb = 1,000 Mb = 1,000,000,000 bytes.
But the computer system and software typically counts capacity in binary, so 1 Gb = 1024 Mb = 1,073,741,824.
Thus a 40Gb drive will read around 37 to 38 Gb of free space, bearing in mind that a small amount is always lost in the formatting process to the file system as well. "
- HDD FAQ!
!