Epson R200/R300 greyscale/black and white printing?

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Hi,

Anyone found the best combo of paper and settings to get as close to a B+W
print with the R200?

If I print straight onto Premium Glossy, I see a magenta cast - easy to dial
in -5%M, but then you are left with a green cast.

Si.
8 answers Last reply
More about epson r200 r300 greyscale black white printing
  1. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    On Wed, 8 Dec 2004 01:05:00 -0000, "Si" <insert@addresshere.co.uk>
    wrote:

    >Hi,
    >
    >Anyone found the best combo of paper and settings to get as close to a B+W
    >print with the R200?
    >
    >If I print straight onto Premium Glossy, I see a magenta cast - easy to dial
    >in -5%M, but then you are left with a green cast.
    >
    The reason, most likely, that you're getting a magenta cast is because
    you're double managing colour, or not colour managing at all.

    --

    Hecate - The Real One
    Hecate@newsguy.com
    veni, vidi, reliqui
  2. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    On Wed, 8 Dec 2004 01:05:00 -0000, Si wrote:

    > Hi,
    >
    > Anyone found the best combo of paper and settings to get as close to a B+W
    > print with the R200?
    >
    > If I print straight onto Premium Glossy, I see a magenta cast - easy to dial
    > in -5%M, but then you are left with a green cast.
    >
    > Si.

    I was having the same problem using Epson paper, changed to "PrinArt"
    for Black and White prints.
  3. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    "Hecate" <hecate@newsguy.com> wrote in message
    news:t5scr0lo324i4s9pbja4ujf5qpnbd52p5n@4ax.com...
    > On Wed, 8 Dec 2004 01:05:00 -0000, "Si" <insert@addresshere.co.uk>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>Hi,
    >>
    >>Anyone found the best combo of paper and settings to get as close to a B+W
    >>print with the R200?
    >>
    >>If I print straight onto Premium Glossy, I see a magenta cast - easy to
    >>dial
    >>in -5%M, but then you are left with a green cast.
    >>
    > The reason, most likely, that you're getting a magenta cast is because
    > you're double managing colour, or not colour managing at all.
    >

    Expand on that then please.....

    Si.
  4. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    On Wed, 8 Dec 2004 17:10:45 -0000, "Si" <insert@addresshere.co.uk>
    wrote:

    >
    >"Hecate" <hecate@newsguy.com> wrote in message
    >news:t5scr0lo324i4s9pbja4ujf5qpnbd52p5n@4ax.com...
    >> On Wed, 8 Dec 2004 01:05:00 -0000, "Si" <insert@addresshere.co.uk>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>>Hi,
    >>>
    >>>Anyone found the best combo of paper and settings to get as close to a B+W
    >>>print with the R200?
    >>>
    >>>If I print straight onto Premium Glossy, I see a magenta cast - easy to
    >>>dial
    >>>in -5%M, but then you are left with a green cast.
    >>>
    >> The reason, most likely, that you're getting a magenta cast is because
    >> you're double managing colour, or not colour managing at all.
    >>
    >
    >Expand on that then please.....
    >
    If you use software which is capable of colour management, like
    Photoshop, and set up colour management in the program, then allow the
    printer to colour manage as well, you'll get a colour shift.

    Conversely, if you do no colour management in software and allow the
    printer to "do what it thinks" then you're also quite likely to get a
    colour shift simply because you're allowing the printer to handle the
    RGB/CMYK conversion without first checking that the RGB version is
    suitable. Where you print in b&w, the printer will use colour inks -
    you'll get a colour cast because the printer is "deciding" how to
    convert the tones between true black and true white.

    --

    Hecate - The Real One
    Hecate@newsguy.com
    veni, vidi, reliqui
  5. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    "Hecate" <hecate@newsguy.com> wrote in message
    news:augfr01adq4f2h7kmh583nq0l9qrvga8j5@4ax.com...
    > On Wed, 8 Dec 2004 17:10:45 -0000, "Si" <insert@addresshere.co.uk>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>"Hecate" <hecate@newsguy.com> wrote in message
    >>news:t5scr0lo324i4s9pbja4ujf5qpnbd52p5n@4ax.com...
    >>> On Wed, 8 Dec 2004 01:05:00 -0000, "Si" <insert@addresshere.co.uk>
    >>> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>Hi,
    >>>>
    >>>>Anyone found the best combo of paper and settings to get as close to a
    >>>>B+W
    >>>>print with the R200?
    >>>>
    >>>>If I print straight onto Premium Glossy, I see a magenta cast - easy to
    >>>>dial
    >>>>in -5%M, but then you are left with a green cast.
    >>>>
    >>> The reason, most likely, that you're getting a magenta cast is because
    >>> you're double managing colour, or not colour managing at all.
    >>>
    >>
    >>Expand on that then please.....
    >>
    > If you use software which is capable of colour management, like
    > Photoshop, and set up colour management in the program, then allow the
    > printer to colour manage as well, you'll get a colour shift.
    >
    > Conversely, if you do no colour management in software and allow the
    > printer to "do what it thinks" then you're also quite likely to get a
    > colour shift simply because you're allowing the printer to handle the
    > RGB/CMYK conversion without first checking that the RGB version is
    > suitable. Where you print in b&w, the printer will use colour inks -
    > you'll get a colour cast because the printer is "deciding" how to
    > convert the tones between true black and true white.
    >
    > --
    >

    I'm using Photoshop 5.0

    Coverted the image to Greyscale - printing using Greyscale as the colour
    space - making no adjustments during printing - so where am I going wrong?

    Si.
  6. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    On Fri, 10 Dec 2004 16:10:57 -0000, "Si" <insert@addresshere.co.uk>
    wrote:


    >>>Expand on that then please.....
    >>>
    >> If you use software which is capable of colour management, like
    >> Photoshop, and set up colour management in the program, then allow the
    >> printer to colour manage as well, you'll get a colour shift.
    >>
    >> Conversely, if you do no colour management in software and allow the
    >> printer to "do what it thinks" then you're also quite likely to get a
    >> colour shift simply because you're allowing the printer to handle the
    >> RGB/CMYK conversion without first checking that the RGB version is
    >> suitable. Where you print in b&w, the printer will use colour inks -
    >> you'll get a colour cast because the printer is "deciding" how to
    >> convert the tones between true black and true white.
    >>
    >> --
    >>
    >
    >I'm using Photoshop 5.0
    >
    >Coverted the image to Greyscale - printing using Greyscale as the colour
    >space - making no adjustments during printing - so where am I going wrong?
    >
    I never used PS 5. I went from 4 to 5.5. And, to be honest, I don't
    remember what is and isn't in PS 5. However, the best way to ensure
    that doesn't happen is to control colour management. I.e. use Gamma
    first, if that's all you have. Soft proof the image. (See the manual
    for both things) And first of all, don't use convert to grayscale if
    you can avoid it. I can't remember if Channel Mixer was available
    then, but it's a much better way to turn colour into B&W and gives you
    far more control than the set 3:6:1 (R:G:B) conversion.

    --

    Hecate - The Real One
    Hecate@newsguy.com
    veni, vidi, reliqui
  7. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    "Hecate" <hecate@newsguy.com> wrote in message
    news:o4jkr0hm8df1vp9q90s46gs9dti3qfenb5@4ax.com...
    > On Fri, 10 Dec 2004 16:10:57 -0000, "Si" <insert@addresshere.co.uk>
    > wrote:
    >
    >
    >>>>Expand on that then please.....
    >>>>
    >>> If you use software which is capable of colour management, like
    >>> Photoshop, and set up colour management in the program, then allow the
    >>> printer to colour manage as well, you'll get a colour shift.
    >>>
    >>> Conversely, if you do no colour management in software and allow the
    >>> printer to "do what it thinks" then you're also quite likely to get a
    >>> colour shift simply because you're allowing the printer to handle the
    >>> RGB/CMYK conversion without first checking that the RGB version is
    >>> suitable. Where you print in b&w, the printer will use colour inks -
    >>> you'll get a colour cast because the printer is "deciding" how to
    >>> convert the tones between true black and true white.
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>>
    >>
    >>I'm using Photoshop 5.0
    >>
    >>Coverted the image to Greyscale - printing using Greyscale as the colour
    >>space - making no adjustments during printing - so where am I going wrong?
    >>
    > I never used PS 5. I went from 4 to 5.5. And, to be honest, I don't
    > remember what is and isn't in PS 5. However, the best way to ensure
    > that doesn't happen is to control colour management. I.e. use Gamma
    > first, if that's all you have. Soft proof the image. (See the manual
    > for both things) And first of all, don't use convert to grayscale if
    > you can avoid it. I can't remember if Channel Mixer was available
    > then, but it's a much better way to turn colour into B&W and gives you
    > far more control than the set 3:6:1 (R:G:B) conversion.
    >
    > --
    >

    I'll have a read up - I'm using Image -> Mode -> Greyscale at the moment -
    perhaps as you say, not the best.

    Si.
  8. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    On Sat, 11 Dec 2004 12:19:36 -0000, "Si" <insert@addresshere.co.uk>
    wrote:


    >> I never used PS 5. I went from 4 to 5.5. And, to be honest, I don't
    >> remember what is and isn't in PS 5. However, the best way to ensure
    >> that doesn't happen is to control colour management. I.e. use Gamma
    >> first, if that's all you have. Soft proof the image. (See the manual
    >> for both things) And first of all, don't use convert to grayscale if
    >> you can avoid it. I can't remember if Channel Mixer was available
    >> then, but it's a much better way to turn colour into B&W and gives you
    >> far more control than the set 3:6:1 (R:G:B) conversion.
    >>
    >> --
    >>
    >
    >I'll have a read up - I'm using Image -> Mode -> Greyscale at the moment -
    >perhaps as you say, not the best.
    >
    The trouble with it is the lack of control. For average images with
    say a complete range of Zone System tones, it'll give you a reasonable
    result. For anything more challenging you'll end with a less than
    optimal result.

    --

    Hecate - The Real One
    Hecate@newsguy.com
    veni, vidi, reliqui
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