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When are you good enough??

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Anonymous
May 3, 2005 6:38:26 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

Hi..

When is it possible to say that you are good enough at FS2004??

I know how most things are working, but still there is also a lot of small
details I don´t quite know..

Is it much easier to perform a VOR approach with the GPS in 2004??...I know
how it´s done in FS2002 without GPS of course

Haven´t been flying in FS2004 very much

More about : good

Anonymous
May 3, 2005 6:38:27 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

Erik,
Surely only you can know the answer to this virtually imossible question?
A few weeks ago I asked 'How long is a piece of string?'

I believe that this is another similar situation...

Cheers,

Quilly











An individual reply goes into my spam filter
May 3, 2005 6:38:27 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

Erik Selde wrote:
> Hi..
>
> When is it possible to say that you are good enough at FS2004??
>

When you attain the level of mediocrity desired, or the Peter Principle is
reached, which ever comes first...........
Related resources
Anonymous
May 3, 2005 6:38:27 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

Erik wrote:

> Is it much easier to perform a VOR approach with the GPS in
2004??...I know
> how it´s done in FS2002 without GPS of course

If you are looking to simulate reality, you can use the GPS to monitor
your VOR approach, but the CDI must be slaved to the VOR as you are
most likely doing in FS2002, not to the GPS.

Of course, in FS200x, the VOR needle is so unrealistically stable that
the CDI might as well be slaved to the GPS. :)  It would be slick if
MS released a version of MSFS that properly simulated the random
oscillation of the VOR needle.

BTW, did you have any comments about the other GPS threads you started
last week? You did see all the replies, right? :) 

I am reminded of a time several years ago when I subscribed to a
particular software group. There was this one poster who showed up
about every month, posted a question asking how to do something in the
software, then never replied back to the many answers he received. A
few weeks would go by and bam, another question. Still no reply to the
many answers he received. This went on for about 8 months when the
rest of the group who took the time to reply to all of his posts
finally decided that the author behind these "hit and run" posts must
have been nothing more than a Coca Cola bottle stuck to a window shade
drawstring tapping out random keystrokes every time the wind blew.

--
Peter
Anonymous
May 3, 2005 6:38:27 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

Quilljar wrote:

> I saw that film...'On the Beach' from Neville Shute's book.

Read the book as part of a high-school English class requirement. It
was one of my favorite books.

--
Peter
Was wondering if anyone would catch the reference
Anonymous
May 3, 2005 6:38:27 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

Erik:

> Of course I do see the answers posted back, but what do you what me
to say.
<snip>

How to reply? How about whether the information given was enough of an
answer to the question you posed or, if not, perhaps some followup
questions? Or, maybe even a simple "thank you."

Don't misunderstand me, though, as I do not mean to tell you what to
do. The reality is that too often many posts get lost in Usenet.
Whether the problem is at a newsgroup server or whether it is at the
user's newsreader side is irrelevant; the question unanswered posts
raise is always, "did he actually see the replies to his original
post?" A reply, any reply, indicates that the original poster read
the answers.

That is, unless you are really a Coke bottle stuck in a drawstring
hitting the keyboard as the wind blows. ;-)

--
Peter
May 3, 2005 6:38:28 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

On Tue, 3 May 2005 08:19:49 -0500, "CRaSH" <sorry@aint-here.spam.com>
brought the following to our attention:

>Erik Selde wrote:
>> Hi..
>>
>> When is it possible to say that you are good enough at FS2004??
>>
>
>When you attain the level of mediocrity desired, or the Peter Principle is
>reached, which ever comes first...........
>

when one rises to their level of incompetence? { smile }

really tho..

* how about after you've learned all the keyboard shortcuts by heart?

* or you can fly an entire route w/o autopilot..

* have not logged one crash in the past year.. :) 
Anonymous
May 3, 2005 7:26:01 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

Hey,

I saw that film...'On the Beach' from Neville Shute's book.


Cheers,

Quilly











An individual reply goes into my spam filter
Anonymous
May 3, 2005 11:37:16 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

Hi Peter,
Of course I do see the answers posted back, but what do you what me to say.
I can´t go into some discussion whether what you have written back to me is
right or wrong, since I don´t know it. If I knew I wouldn´t have asked the
questions in the first place.


"pr" <proffice@twcny.rr.com> skrev i en meddelelse
news:1115134547.759210.173650@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> Quilljar wrote:
>
>> I saw that film...'On the Beach' from Neville Shute's book.
>
> Read the book as part of a high-school English class requirement. It
> was one of my favorite books.
>
> --
> Peter
> Was wondering if anyone would catch the reference
>
Anonymous
May 4, 2005 2:30:54 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

On Tue, 3 May 2005 14:38:26 +0200, Erik Selde wrote:

> When is it possible to say that you are good enough at FS2004??

1) When you no longer ask questions about how it works or how to fly, but
you sit by until a question is posted that you know the answer to.

2) When then answers *you* give to a question aren't corrected by someone
who flys in the real world too.
In this case you can either:
a) feel like a complete boob
b) reply with "oh yeah....that'll work too. :-)"
c) drink something strong and forget what the initial question was

--

Marcel (SAG-21)
(That's no moon...it's a space station!)
May 4, 2005 2:30:55 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

Marcel Kuijper wrote:
> On Tue, 3 May 2005 14:38:26 +0200, Erik Selde wrote:
>
>> When is it possible to say that you are good enough at FS2004??
>
> 1) When you no longer ask questions about how it works or how to fly,
> but you sit by until a question is posted that you know the answer to.
>
> 2) When then answers *you* give to a question aren't corrected by
> someone who flys in the real world too.
> In this case you can either:
> a) feel like a complete boob
> b) reply with "oh yeah....that'll work too. :-)"
> c) drink something strong and forget what the initial question was

d) drink something strong, feel a boob, and reply "yeah!"
[with therapy you should regain use of your hand in a week or so]

d:->))
Anonymous
May 4, 2005 2:30:56 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

Erik,
First of all I did not guess that English was not your first language, so
stop that worry for a start.
Second, it sounds to me as if you believe there are some 'rules' with Flight
Simming. Well there are no rules. I am a qualified pilot and air navigator
but I have never even used the GPS or the VOR in FS9. I do not know how to,
and I do not want to know. I just enjoy mucking about flying the planes and
whizzing to different places to see what they look like. New York, Mount
Everest. All the places I have been on holiday or where I might go on
holiday.
I paid for the program, so I make the rules, and for me there are none. Try
and do the same, just get in there and experiment and enjoy yourself.

Some simmers want to try and behave exactly like an airline captain and that
is fine, others like to pretend to be flying doctors around the Australian
bush, fine too. It can be as serious or as light-hearted as you make it. No
exams and no criticisim.

You can be yourself and be FREE :-)

Shhh - my confession - I mostly get around by slewing :-(


Cheers,

Quilly











An individual reply goes into my spam filter
May 4, 2005 2:30:57 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

Quilljar wrote:
>
> Shhh - my confession -



Is that a (D)?
Anonymous
May 4, 2005 2:38:52 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

CRaSH wrote:
> Quilljar wrote:
>>
>> Shhh - my confession -
>
>
>
> Is that a (D)?


F - I should think!!


--
Cheers,

Quilly











An individual reply goes into my spam filter
Anonymous
May 4, 2005 4:04:14 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

Yes you are right Peter. The information you provided has helped me a lot.
As you probably have guessed english is not my mothers tougue (or whatever
you called it), and even though Rod Machado is good teacher, it doensn´t
always seems that he is detailed enough for me to understand it, like the
GPS approaches for example...I still don´t wether I have understood these
kinds of approaches correctly...I do know how to perform a VOR approach
however. That new GPS in FS2004 is quite advanced, and I haven´t had time to
read the manual yet...
"pr" <proffice@twcny.rr.com> skrev i en meddelelse
news:1115145192.644171.112130@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com...
> Erik:
>
>> Of course I do see the answers posted back, but what do you what me
> to say.
> <snip>
>
> How to reply? How about whether the information given was enough of an
> answer to the question you posed or, if not, perhaps some followup
> questions? Or, maybe even a simple "thank you."
>
> Don't misunderstand me, though, as I do not mean to tell you what to
> do. The reality is that too often many posts get lost in Usenet.
> Whether the problem is at a newsgroup server or whether it is at the
> user's newsreader side is irrelevant; the question unanswered posts
> raise is always, "did he actually see the replies to his original
> post?" A reply, any reply, indicates that the original poster read
> the answers.
>
> That is, unless you are really a Coke bottle stuck in a drawstring
> hitting the keyboard as the wind blows. ;-)
>
> --
> Peter
>
Anonymous
May 4, 2005 5:01:43 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

Hi Quilljar, how can you navigate your way around, and not using either GPS
or VOR...as far as I know the VOR transmitter also has limited range...

Are you using NDB´s instead..??


"Quilljar" <wykehill-flightsim@yahoo.co.uk> skrev i en meddelelse
news:D 58t9v$eje$1@nwrdmz03.dmz.ncs.ea.ibs-infra.bt.com...
> Erik,
> First of all I did not guess that English was not your first language, so
> stop that worry for a start.
> Second, it sounds to me as if you believe there are some 'rules' with
> Flight Simming. Well there are no rules. I am a qualified pilot and air
> navigator but I have never even used the GPS or the VOR in FS9. I do not
> know how to, and I do not want to know. I just enjoy mucking about flying
> the planes and whizzing to different places to see what they look like.
> New York, Mount Everest. All the places I have been on holiday or where I
> might go on holiday.
> I paid for the program, so I make the rules, and for me there are none.
> Try and do the same, just get in there and experiment and enjoy yourself.
>
> Some simmers want to try and behave exactly like an airline captain and
> that is fine, others like to pretend to be flying doctors around the
> Australian bush, fine too. It can be as serious or as light-hearted as you
> make it. No exams and no criticisim.
>
> You can be yourself and be FREE :-)
>
> Shhh - my confession - I mostly get around by slewing :-(
>
>
> Cheers,
>
> Quilly
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> An individual reply goes into my spam filter
>
May 4, 2005 5:01:44 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

On Wed, 4 May 2005 01:01:43 +0200, "Erik Selde" <erik.selde@mail.dk>
brought the following to our attention:
>
>Hi Quilljar, how can you navigate your way around, and not using either GPS
>or VOR...as far as I know the VOR transmitter also has limited range...
>
>Are you using NDB´s instead..??
>

and no flight plans either.. ask him about that!! ;]

-G
May 4, 2005 9:05:44 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

"Gregory"
> and no flight plans either.. ask him about that!! ;]

I think Quilljar's operative words here are: "I just enjoy mucking about..."

Very often I'll sit on the ground and do all the math, run through the
checklists and fly by the book.

Then sometimes I'll just go "Quilling".


Quilling - verb. To muck about aimlessly without a flight plan or Navaids.


Dallas
May 4, 2005 9:43:08 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

"Quilljar"
> I saw that film...'On the Beach' from Neville Shute's book.

Hey, did they ever explain where all the people's bodies went in that movie?
I mean wouldn't there be rotted corpses and skeletons laying around
everywhere?


Dallas
May 4, 2005 10:00:20 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

Dallas wrote:

> "Gregory"
>
>>and no flight plans either.. ask him about that!! ;]
>
>
> I think Quilljar's operative words here are: "I just enjoy mucking about..."
>
> Very often I'll sit on the ground and do all the math, run through the
> checklists and fly by the book.
>
> Then sometimes I'll just go "Quilling".
>
>
> Quilling - verb. To muck about aimlessly without a flight plan or Navaids.
>
>
> Dallas
>
>

Now I know what I'm doing. As I'm flying around sticking the nose of my
helicopter into buildings trying to find something interesting, I'm
Quilling.....

--

boB,
Master_Caution_70

U.S. Army Aviation (retired)
Central Texas - 5NM West of Gray Army Airfield (KGRK)
Anonymous
May 4, 2005 11:26:16 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

Erik wrote:

> ...I still don´t wether I have understood these
> kinds of approaches correctly...I do know how to perform a VOR
approach
> however. That new GPS in FS2004 is quite advanced, and I haven´t had
time to
> read the manual yet...

Once you set up the GPS properly, flying a GPS approach is very similar
to flying a VOR approach. It appears to me that you are struggling
with how to set up the GPS, not how to actually fly the approach, since
you have already mastered a VOR approach.

To set up the GPS, it really is just a series of button pushing on the
GPS, but as I indicated in another post, the MS default GPS in FS2004
has several limitations. I have not used that GPS since pretty much
the first few weeks after installing FS2004 (a couple of years ago), so
I have forgotten the procedures for setting that GPS up to fly an
approach.

If you ever consider purchasing the Reality XP Garmin GNS430/530 GPS
gauge that I linked in another post or an aircraft equipped with this
GPS, I would be happy to provide you the steps you need to properly set
up the GPS so that you can fly GPS approaches. Just post back here
under a new thread.

Best,

--
Peter
Anonymous
May 4, 2005 1:48:11 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

Erik Selde wrote:
> Hi Quilljar, how can you navigate your way around, and not using
> either GPS or VOR...as far as I know the VOR transmitter also has
> limited range...
> Are you using NDB´s instead..??


I do not wish to sound evil here, but let's get this straight. In real life
when I fly, even in England, I am allowed to get into a small aircraft and
take off and go wherever I want without a flight plan and without using any
navaids. As long as I keep out of the airways (below them usually) I can fly
around the countryside, do a few aerobatics, look at a friend's farm and get
home for tea. I navigate in the time honoured way called 'pilotage'. That
is, along roads, railways, rivers, coastline etc. and by using a bit of dead
reckoning. What is good enough for RL is good enough for the Sim. Since I
was five years old, that is how I have wanted to fly. For eight wonderful
years the Navy let my fly around in much the same way except on military
exercises.

Who needs an NDB or a GPS? I have never used them IRL, why start now? I have
a compass, an altimeter, a watch and a pretty good idea of which way the
wind is blowing. In a sim it is easier still, as I have FSNav and my
armchair and no CAA or FAA or ATC to tell me what to do, and I never run
out of gas.

Can I help by making it any clearer? FS9 is absolutely great!

Cheers,

Quilly











An individual reply goes into my spam filter
Anonymous
May 5, 2005 12:06:56 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

On Tue, 3 May 2005 16:29:39 -0500, CRaSH wrote:

> d) drink something strong, feel a boob, and reply "yeah!"
> [with therapy you should regain use of your hand in a week or so]

Sounds like a standard Fridaynight Arkansas thing, but I like the idea. <g>

--

Marcel (SAG-21)
(Chance favours the prepared mind.)
Anonymous
May 5, 2005 12:07:40 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

On Wed, 04 May 2005 05:05:44 GMT, Dallas wrote:

> Quilling - verb. To muck about aimlessly without a flight plan or Navaids.

LOL!!

--

Marcel (SAG-21)
(I've got a baaad feeling about this.....)
Anonymous
May 5, 2005 2:10:57 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

> wait.. wait.. I must ask about slew mode.. did you say earlier that
> you mostly zip around the UK by slewing?? I think slew is good to
> schlep around the field.. and to go up and check the ILS or radio-Nav
> vectors.. even to take screen caps.. and also if one is too lazy to
> take off.. can simply start FS on field.. slew up to 4,000.. then exit
> slew.. Sim will put you at xxx kts.. and then retract wheels.. fly
> off! { grin }
>
> -Gregory
>
> ok.. am going up now and work the radios.. { chuckle }


I slew all over the world not just the UK, and use FSNav a lot to place my
aircraft in remote places very quickly. Yes, of course I have unlimited fuel
selected, who wants a pretend plane to run out of pretend fuel, just when I
am in a Cessna at 60,000 feet without pretend oxygen? You think I want to
plunge to my pretend death?

Sheeeesh!


Cheers,

Quilly











An individual reply goes into my spam filter
May 5, 2005 2:10:58 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

On Wed, 4 May 2005 22:10:57 +0000 (UTC), "Quilljar"
<wykehill-flightsim@yahoo.co.uk> brought the following to our
attention:

>Yes, of course I have unlimited fuel selected...

da-oooh!!


-G
May 5, 2005 3:01:08 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

On Tue, 3 May 2005 14:38:26 +0200, "Erik Selde" <erik.selde@mail.dk>
wrote:

>Hi..
>
>When is it possible to say that you are good enough at FS2004??
>
>I know how most things are working, but still there is also a lot of small
>details I don´t quite know..
>
>Is it much easier to perform a VOR approach with the GPS in 2004??...I know
>how it´s done in FS2002 without GPS of course
>
>Haven´t been flying in FS2004 very much

It's a sim.

When you are satisfied with your ability that is good enough... Unless
you are going to compete with some one.

(OR put on a demonstration)

Roger Halstead (K8RI & ARRL life member)
(N833R, S# CD-2 Worlds oldest Debonair)
www.rogerhalstead.com
>
May 5, 2005 3:07:33 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

Quilljar wrote:

>>wait.. wait.. I must ask about slew mode.. did you say earlier that
>>you mostly zip around the UK by slewing?? I think slew is good to
>>schlep around the field.. and to go up and check the ILS or radio-Nav
>>vectors.. even to take screen caps.. and also if one is too lazy to
>>take off.. can simply start FS on field.. slew up to 4,000.. then exit
>>slew.. Sim will put you at xxx kts.. and then retract wheels.. fly
>>off! { grin }
>>
>> -Gregory
>>
>>ok.. am going up now and work the radios.. { chuckle }
>
>
>
> I slew all over the world not just the UK, and use FSNav a lot to place my
> aircraft in remote places very quickly. Yes, of course I have unlimited fuel
> selected, who wants a pretend plane to run out of pretend fuel, just when I
> am in a Cessna at 60,000 feet without pretend oxygen? You think I want to
> plunge to my pretend death?
>
> Sheeeesh!
>
>
> Cheers,
>
> Quilly
>

LVL

--

boB,


U.S. Army Aviation (retired)
Central Texas - 5NM West of Gray Army Airfield (KGRK)
Anonymous
May 5, 2005 10:32:22 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

Quilly wrote:

> What does this acronym stand for?
> On Google I could only get 'Laminated Veneer Lumber'

Laughing Very Loud?

--
Peter
Anonymous
May 5, 2005 1:45:25 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

LVL


What does this acronym stand for?
On Google I could only get 'Laminated Veneer Lumber'


--
Cheers,

Quilly











An individual reply goes into my spam filter
May 5, 2005 2:39:43 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

On Thu, 5 May 2005 09:45:25 +0000 (UTC), "Quilljar"
<wykehill-flightsim@yahoo.co.uk> brought the following to our
attention:

> LVL
>
>
>What does this acronym stand for?
>On Google I could only get 'Laminated Veneer Lumber'


this site used to be good.. http://www.acronymfinder.com/
May 6, 2005 12:13:58 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

Quilljar wrote:
> LVL
>
>
> What does this acronym stand for?
> On Google I could only get 'Laminated Veneer Lumber'
>
>

Laughing VERY Loud - almost FOFLMAO, but not quite

--

boB,
Master_Caution_70

U.S. Army Aviation (retired)
Central Texas - 5NM West of Gray Army Airfield (KGRK)
May 6, 2005 12:14:16 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

pr wrote:

> Quilly wrote:
>
>
>>What does this acronym stand for?
>>On Google I could only get 'Laminated Veneer Lumber'
>
>
> Laughing Very Loud?
>

Yep.....

--

boB,
Master_Caution_70

U.S. Army Aviation (retired)
Central Texas - 5NM West of Gray Army Airfield (KGRK)
!